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Mustangs, Living on the Edge.

Posted: Sun Jun 28, 2015 5:15 pm
by mustang
The comments from my last post got me to thinking how hard it is to capture "the moment" of milling through a hundred and thirty head of wild mustangs, much of the time within five or six feet of some of them. Not all will be so trusting but over the years most have learned to accept my presence in their world. There is a risk in being surrounded by a band of thousand pound pieces of horse flesh that are known to explode in every direction at the slightest different little noise. They are so use to getting out of the way of those old studs, that they don't bother looking where they are headed at a high rate of speed. They only run a few feet before they realize the danger has past and all is well.

I found 136 head on the Pony Express Trail Road just before I got to Simpson Spring. It's not often I found them this far south, but was happy to find them at all.

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Friendly Fred and his nephew, Peanut are hanging out together and making peace.
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Fred's mother and the band Dad.
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Not everyone is in a peaceful state of mind. I'd guess someone got into the wrong territory.
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Pictures don't show that there are mustangs on all four sides.
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Gypsy's fifth colt. He's growing up to be a fine looking young man, and not prone to cause trouble.
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Peanut is making the rounds, making friends with all the youngsters.
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When someone tipped my chair over, there was a stampede for a few feet. I'm glad I wasn't in the chair.
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The band moved down to the Simpson Spring pond. It was hot and they got pretty docile. They wouldn't hardly move out of my way when I tried to walk through them.
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This old boy laid his ears back when I ask him to move a few feet. However I wasn't worried, I was packin my .357. I was in a little bit of a panic when I got home and found I'd forgot to load it.
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I was happy to see this old white stud made it through the winter. He walks slower than he use to, and keeps on the outskirts of the band. As late as it was, I though I might hear a coyote howl, but no such luck. Two hours and I'll be home.
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This post is the result of a "pat on the head" from Faster Horses, Big Muddy, MRJ and Burnt. Thanks for your support. :D

Re: Mustangs, Living on the Edge.

Posted: Sun Jun 28, 2015 5:23 pm
by Faster horses
Hey, you are the one that gets the 'pat on the head! It is a treat to see your photos. Thank you so much for sharing them with us!
These were amazing!! You certainly captured a cute shot of Peanut.
Nice to see Friendly Fred has finally shed off so we can tell what he looks like.
All the mustangs look really good and I'm glad you got so close to them and survived. :nod:

THANKS!

Re: Mustangs, Living on the Edge.

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:14 pm
by Big Muddy rancher
At least you had the camera LOADED :D :lol: :lol:

Re: Mustangs, Living on the Edge.

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2015 8:07 pm
by mustang
How'd ya know ????? I did that once a few years ago. Forgot to charge the battery.

df

Re: Mustangs, Living on the Edge.

Posted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 5:29 am
by mrj
mustang, I think for some of us, these horses will always be fascinating. just seeing them out there 'living their lives' and acting like horses is a treat we can't make for ourselves. They don't act much different than the horses on our ranch, except for more of them, and we have no mares and colts, so miss that 'action' here. We don't have quite the variety of colors, and ours aren't all in one group, with current total numbers maybe around 20, more or less at times among the 12 family members living on this ranch, ages 8 months to 78 years.

It is just good to know some of the wild horses are living like they should, and not in tight confinement as we have seen some groups of them.

I sure do hope common sense will soon take over the management of them, across the west, tho. It just seems a shame more of those good looking horses aren't being trained for useful, productive lives.

So, thanks again for your efforts at photographing them. Glad the opportunity is there, and that someone who obviously enjoys it can do that 'job'.

mrj