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Recipes Requested

Posted: Sat Nov 28, 2015 1:55 pm
by mrj
Here is the bread recipe mentioned as being pretty easy, FH. I found it in the "PARTYLINE COOK BOOK' I bought at a silent auction at an NCBA convention in Charlotte, NC in 1999. Wish I had made such notations in all the cookbooks I have! This one is interesting because many of the contributors are of Basque descent. They sure are good cooks, judging by their recipes!

Batter Bread: Soften 1 pkg. dry yeast in 1/4 c. warm water and set aside. In a large bowl, mix 1 c. warm milk, 1 t. salt, 1/4 c. sugar, 1/4 c. oil or soft butter, and 2 c. all- purpose flour and beat till smooth either with a mixer or by hand (works fine for me). Add yeast, 1 egg and beat again till well mixed. Stir in 1 and 1/4 c. more flour by hand or with bread hook. to make a thick batter. Cover and let rise to doubled which takes about 50 minutes. Stir down and pour into a greased 4"x8" pan, cover with waxed paper and let rise to almost doubled, about 30 minutes. Bake at 375% for about 25 to 39 minutes or to lightly browned. Turn it out onto a rack to cool.
I usually double it or even go 4 x, as I have four loaf pans and have found it freezes well. Some days I like to knead bread, and others, this recipe wins out because that isn't needed for this one. Makes good toast, too, but will print the one for English Muffin Bread, which is best toasted.

I used to need 'quick and easy' recipes because there was just too much to do....these days it is because I'm not getting any younger and have all these things I still want to do in my lifetime! Reason enough, imo.

mrj

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Sat Nov 28, 2015 8:28 pm
by Faster horses
Thank you for the recipe. I can't wait to try it! I have one stand by that is called Speedy Rolls that is really good and doesn't need
kneaded.

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Sat Nov 28, 2015 11:11 pm
by Big Muddy rancher
You mean it's not kneady?

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Sun Nov 29, 2015 7:04 am
by burnt
Big Muddy rancher wrote:You mean it's not kneady?


Is that a punch line?

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Sun Nov 29, 2015 9:18 am
by Big Muddy rancher
burnt wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:You mean it's not kneady?


Is that a punch line?[/quote

Nobody likes their bread burnt,Burnt. :D

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Sun Nov 29, 2015 10:59 am
by mrj
burnt wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:You mean it's not kneady?


Careful there! Another term for 'kneading' a lump of bread dough is to 'punch it down'. There are times when that can be a real stress reliever.

Occasionally, it isn't worth the time, so set the lump aside and go about other business for a while and let it swell up with hot air all by itself!



Is that a punch line?
May be.........depending on the occasion.


Looks like a pretty nice day in SD, considering the miserable weather a couple of states south of us. A slight cover of snow on the ground, about 20 degrees at 10AM, sun peeking out of the cloud cover that's breaking up on the horizons, and NO WIND!

mrj

Re: Recipes Requested

Posted: Tue Dec 08, 2015 8:43 am
by mrj
Off in a different direction: Plantation Pralines....from a Betty Crocker cook book given to me at my bridal shower, fifty eight and a half years ago by a great school teacher and family friend, Elsie Madsen Haddock. Her father was living in the Midland area when both our grandfathers arrived in late 1880's or early 1890's. Descendants of both families still live in the area and trade ranch work when a bigger crew is needed.

Plantation Pralines: This needs a large kettle, 8 quart recommended, as the mixture foams up a lot! Melt 2 Tbsp. butter in the kettle and swab it up the sides a bit, too. Add 2 cups white sugar, 1 tsp. baking soda, 1 cup buttermilk, and a pinch of salt into the pan and cook over high heat five minutes, or to 210%, stirring and scraping the bottom, watching closely so it doesn't scorch. Add 3 cups pecan halves and continue cooking and scraping the bottom till it reaches 230%, or a little of the mixture forms a very soft ball, about 5 minutes. Cool slightly and beat till thickened and creamy. Drop onto waxed paper in size you prefer. Requires a little work, but well worth it! The pecans get toasted in the cooking process and the buttermilk makes the flavor different than any other version we have made. If they set up too fast to get them all dropped onto the waxed paper, just separate them as you would for candied nuts.

mrj