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Fightless Friday, How 'bout some good recipes??

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sw
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Postby sw » Wed Mar 23, 2005 10:57 am

MEAT BALLS AND RED GRAVY
ranchwife, these are really good, we don't use the hot italian sausage because it was too spicy. The leftovers can be used on poorboys. It makes enough to feed Cox's army :lol:

Red Gravy:
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
5 cups chopped yellow onions
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
20 cloves garlic, minced (about 1/3 cup)
2 tablespoons whole fennel seeds
2 (6-ounce) cans tomato paste
4 (15-ounce) cans tomato sauce
1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, pureed with their juice
2 1/2 cups water
2 teaspoons Essence, recipe follows
Sausage Meatballs:
1 1/2 pounds ground chuck
1 1/2 pounds sweet Italian sausage, removed from casings
1 pound hot Italian sausage, removed from casings
10 cloves garlic, minced
2 eggs, lightly beaten
4 teaspoons Essence, recipe follows
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 pound spaghetti, cooked according to package directions
1 cup grated Parmesan, garnish


In a large saucepan, heat the vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, Italian seasoning, salt, and red pepper, and cook, stirring, until the onions are soft, 6 minutes. Add the garlic and fennel, and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring frequently, until paste begins to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce, pureed tomatoes, 2 1/2 cups of water, and Essence, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
In a large bowl, combine the ground chuck, sweet sausage, hot sausage, garlic, eggs, Essence, salt, and black pepper, and mix briefly but thoroughly to distribute seasonings. Shape into meatballs and set aside, refrigerated.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and do not stir until the meatballs float to the top of the sauce, about 10 to 12 minutes. Stir well, and simmer the meatballs in the sauce for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally and skimming any fat that rises to the surface. Taste, adjust seasoning as necessary, and serve immediately over hot pasta. Pass the grated Parmesan at the table.


Essence (Emeril's Creole Seasoning):
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or container.
Yield: about 2/3 cup

Recipe from "New New Orleans Cooking", by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch. Published by William and Morrow
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Postby sw » Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:02 am

NEXT DAY POORBOYS


2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 yellow onions, thinly sliced lengthwise
2 green bell peppers, cored, seeded and cut into 1-inch strips
1 teaspoon Essence
1 large loaf French bread
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1/2 recipe reheated meatballs and gravy, recipe follows
1/2 pound mozzarella, grated
1/2 cup grated Parmesan or Romano

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
Lightly wrap the French bread in aluminum foil and place in the oven until warmed, about 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and increase the heat to broil.
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, and peppers and cook, stirring, until softened and caramelized around the edges, about 6 minutes. Remove from the heat and season with the Essence.
Slice the French bread crosswise into 4 portions, and then cut each piece lengthwise. Spread both cut sides of the bread generously with mayonnaise, and divide the hot meatballs and some of the sauce between the 4 sandwich bottoms. Divide the grated mozzarella and Parmesan between the sandwiches, then top each sandwich with onions and peppers. Top with more of the remaining sauce. Place the bottom of the sandwiches on a baking sheet and broil in the oven until the cheese is melted. Remove from the oven and top with the remaining bread. Serve immediately.

:D :D :D
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:25 am

TTB,

Here's Corky's favorite recipe. We call them Corky's Cookies.

BOWSER'S RANCH-STYLE BEEF BONES

Makes a dark, textured, crunchy, meaty-flavored biscuit.

1 lb lean ground beef
2 eggs, beaten
3 C all purpose flour
1 C quick cooking rolled oats
1 C water

1. In a blender or food processor, combine beef and beaten eggs until well blended and set aside.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine flour and rolled oats. Gradually mix in beef mixture with your hands, until well blended.

3. Add water and stir to form a sticky dough.

4. Divide dough into 2 balls, so it is easy to work with.

5. Knead each dough ball on a well floured surface, about 2 minutes, adding flour until the dough is no longer sticky.

6. With a rolling pin, roll dough to between 1/4" and 1/2" thickness.

7. Cut with K-9 Biscuit Cutter and place on a lightly greased baking sheet.

8. Bake 1 hour at 350 degrees.

9. Cool on a rack and store, at room temperature, in a container with a loose-fitting lid.

This seems like alot of work, so I've honed this down a little. Blending hamburger in a food processor really stressed ours out - last time I made these I just mixed 2 eggs with thawed out hamburger. Found no difference in texture nor taste!!!

I've found Corky likes them chewy, so I make them a little bigger, or bake for a shorter period of time.

Our 12 yr old daughter ordered this book by mail, it was her gift to the doggies. This set came with 3 different size bone-shaped biscuit cutters and the book.

The book is MacPherson's K-9 Cookbook, printed, bound and published in Canada by:

Sawbuck Ventures Ltd.
2225 Northey's Rd.
RR3 Lakefield, Ont
KOL 2H0
Phone: 705-652-6831
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.
I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'
-Ronald Reagan

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Postby ranchwife » Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:26 am

sw.....am on my way out the door.....got me some serious grocery shopping to do....will keep you posted on how these meatballs do :D
Love wins....ennis, montana....June 14, 2003!!!
Never forget!

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Postby sw » Wed Mar 23, 2005 4:42 pm

fh, we got a recipe book from some friends in Texas, he is originally a Pennsylvania Dutchman and the book has some very old recipes. He loved Scrapple from his youth and highlighted the recipe. Have never had it, but it is different than the one you posted. I'll post it just as written in the book.

Scrapple
Boil 3 lbs Pork sausage meat, broken into fine bits, in 3 qts. water. Add 1 lb. beef liver if desired. Cook until meat is very well done. (DO NOT TASTE PORK MIXTURE UNTIL FINISHED COOKING). Add Dried corn meal into meat broth until you have very thick mixture. Spoon into five loaf pans. When cold, slice in thin slices and put on baking sheet in 375 degree oven, turn once. Bake to delicate crispness. Serve with syrup. Can also be fried.

The book is dated 1987 but the recipes were the authors' grandmothers and the pictures have wood cook stoves and all of the women have on their bonnets. There is stuff in the book that I would never put in my mouth :o Also, they used very little in the form of spices, alot of vinegar and whatever they could raise, interesting
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Postby nr » Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:12 pm

sw, to my thinking there is nothing as delectable as seeing a capable man cooking in the kitchen in his stocking feet. :D yum!

Scrapple: we like scrapple best when it is seasoned well with pepper and sage, fried crisp on the outside and served with eggs and bottle of ketchup.

The mention of taco soup reminded me of a Canadian recipe for
Pizza Soup which we like:
Saute chopped small onion, 1/4 cup green pepper and 1/2 c sliced mushrooms til softened.
Add 1 can 28 oz plum tomatoes (don't drain)
Add 1 cup beef stock
1 c sliced pepperoni (about 5 oz)
1/2 tsp dried basil. Heat thoroughly. Ladle into 4 bowls and sprinkle on shredded mozzarella cheese. Broil or nuke for 1-1/2 min. til cheese melts and is bubbly. Serve with crusty bread.

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:36 pm

Ranchwife,

Right now, we are simmering your yummy sounding potato soup recipe. This morning, got up, glaze of ice on all our windows (on the outside), take daughter to the bus, glaze of ice on the dirt road (Boy, was THAT fun - NOT) 6 mi round trip, been 20 degrees all day, wind blowing, snowing. We're COLD so we decided to copy all these wonderful recipes and put them in our green cookbook. Spousie and I put together the soup (I love working in the kitchen with that man), talked politics, etc, and now we're letting the soup simmer. We'll let ya know!!! Thanks so much for the yummy recipes!!! I might get another thread started for this summer, for grillin' and chillin'. Not now, it's COLD outside!!
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.

I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'

-Ronald Reagan

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Wed Mar 23, 2005 10:12 pm

Great potato soup!!! We'll make it your way from now on!!! YUMMMMMYYYY!!!
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.

I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'

-Ronald Reagan

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Postby sw » Thu Mar 24, 2005 5:41 pm

ranchwife,
how did the meatballs go over? Did Jesse like his dinner? did he get another birthday Present? :wink: :wink:
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Postby sw » Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:31 pm

Just thought of another thing we do that is not in the books that is nothing special but kids ask for it. My mom made these when I was little and we were going fishing so that she did not have to take along all of the fixin's. seems that all of the flavors cook into the meat and blend.

Stuffed Burgers
make hamburger patties about 1/4 inch thick, two for every serving.
Put ketchup, mustard, cheese, pickles, onions, mushrooms, whatever your diners prefer, on one of the patties. Cover that patty with another one and seal the edges by pinching them together. Fry, grill or whatever is convenient, throw on a bun, eat like a steak, do whatever and it is very good. My daughter prefers large ones like a steak, pepperoni and mozzarella cheese, and mushrooms, sprinkle with italian seasoning, pizza sauce or ketchup, we have a winner!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Postby sw » Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:49 pm

another favorite...

Orange-Glazed Flank Steaks

Marinade:

2/3 C dry red wine
1/2 C orange juice
1/3 C lime juice
1/2 C honey
1/4 C cider vinegar
1/4 C soy sauce, preferable Kikkoman
2 T mild olive oil
1 1/2 t minced garlic
1 t finely grated orange zest
1 t tabasco sauce
1/2 t ground cumin
1/2 t ground thyme
1/4 t ground black pepper

2 - 2lb flank steaks,

To make the marinade, combine all ingredients in a shallow 14" glass baking dish and stir until honey is dissolved. Add the flank steaks, turn to coat, cover and refrigerate overnight.

Bring the steaks to room temperature, prepare coals for grilling, or preheat broiler in oven. Drain the steaks, reserving the marinade. Place the marinade in a large skillet and bring to a boil over high heat. Continue boiling until marinade is syrupy and mahogany colored, about 10 min. Remove from heat and let cool. Brush the glaze on both sides of the steaks, grill or broil 4" from heat until nicely glazed, about 5 min. Turn and grill 5 min longer for med rare steaks. Let the meat rest 5 min before carving. Transfer steaks to cutting board, holding a sharp knife at a 45 degree angle, cut the steaks across the grain in thin slices. Transfer the meat to a warm platter, top with remaining glaze, serve immediately.

Side note: This turns a very unpopular cut into something totally AWESOME!!! We've done this with round steak, the citric acid tenderizes and gives a great flavor! :D
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Postby Hanta Yo » Thu Mar 24, 2005 8:17 pm

Boy, gotta outdo sw;

Navajo Fry Bread

4 C all purpose flour
1 T Baking Powder
1 t salt
2 T nonfat dry milk powder
1-1/2 C warm water
1-2 C solid shortening or lard, for frying

Combine flour, baking powder, salt and dry milk powder in a large mixing bowl. Gradually stir in warm water. Mix until dough forms a ball and comes clean from edge of bowl. You may need to add a little additional water. Knead dough with your hands until well mixed and dough is elastic. Divide dough into 6 large pieces and roll into balls. Using palms of your hands, pat out dough into circles that are about 1/2 inch thick.

Melt shortening in a large skillet. You will need about 3/4 inch of melted fat. Heat to 400 degrees. Slip a rounded, flat piece of dough into the hot fat - it will start to rise to the top. When the underside is brown, turn over and brown the other side. Drain on paper towels. Repeat with remaining dough. (For a snack, divide dough into small portions to make 2 inch balls. After cooking and draining, sprinkle with confectioners sugar or drizzle with honey). Yields 6 large portions or 8-10 snack portions.

We use the smaller portions, make honey butter and WOW!!

Taken from "The Best Basic & Easy Recipes of CHUCK WAGON COOKING"
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.

I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'

-Ronald Reagan


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