Ranchers.net Bull Session

Fightless Friday, How 'bout some good recipes??

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Jinglebob
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Postby Jinglebob » Thu Mar 24, 2005 8:27 pm

OK, here goes!
Best strawberry pie

Get some good fresh strawberries and cut them into small pieces. In a pinch you can use frozen strawberries.

Pour lots of sugar over strawberries.

Mix a whole bunch.

Pour into premade pie crust.

Chill.

Serve.

Eat strawberries and throw the damn crust away! :lol:
Toda via estoy aqui. I am still here.
website www.dennisranch.com

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Thu Mar 24, 2005 8:42 pm

Sourdough bread is such a treat!!! Here are several recipes to get your "starter" started.

Sourdough starter (This came from Alaska in the 1900's)

Wash, peel and cube 4 potatoes. Boil in unsalted water, about 5 pints (10 C) with a lid on. When the potatoes are well done, remove them and let the water cool. Add to potato water 1 T salt. Stir in enough flour to make a thin batter. Pour this into a crock, cover it with a cheese cloth. Put in a warm place 2-3 days until it has fermented. Now transfer it to a glass jar. Can be kept in the refrigerator indefinitely.

Replenish this with equal amts of milk and flour plus 1/8 C sugar.



Another one:

Wild Yeast Starter (this is what I am using today, this starter is several years old, I think of it as a "pet", put in fridge when I don't use it (summer) bring it back out in the fall, bring to room temp, add a little flour, sugar, milk to get it bubbling again. I found a large crock w/lid at a 2nd hand store. Works GREAT!!


Place 1 C milk in a glass jar or crock and allow to stand at room temperature for 24 hrs. Stir in 1 C flour. (To speed process, cover jar with cheesecloth and place outside for several hours to expose dough to the wild yeast floating in the wind).

Leave uncovered in a warm place for 2 to 5 days, depending upon how long it takes to bubble and sour. If it starts to dry out, stir in enough tepid water to bring is back to original consistency. Once it has a good sour aroma, and is full of bubles, it is ready to use. Each time you use part of the starter, replenish it with a mixture of equal parts of flour and milk.



I've been doing sourdough for over 20 years. My family LOVES IT! I think that little "extra" effort is very much worth it, those of you who have never had "homemade" sourdough biscuits are missing out BIG TIME!! If any of you would like to get something started, I have no problems helping you out. Just ask, however you want and I will be so glad to reply. Just pulled 2 awesome sourdough "french bread" out of the oven. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!!

I will also be glad in sharing sourdough pancakes recipe MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!! etc, etc. This sourdough stuff is a "dying breed" so to speak, I would love to get it back into the families!!!
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.
I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'
-Ronald Reagan

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Big Muddy rancher
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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Thu Mar 24, 2005 8:56 pm

All this food talk makes me think a Ranchers.net road trip is in order to visit all these great cooks. :cowboy: But it will halfto wait until after calving and haying ..........
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I can't tame wild women.

But I can make tame women wild.

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sw
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Postby sw » Thu Mar 24, 2005 10:19 pm

you're welcome anytime, BMR, same with the rest of you. We love to cook yummy meals (however, we don't weigh 300 lbs as you would probably think - we might be 10 lb overweight) would like to get acquainted with our northern neighbors, you are no different than us, we are all concerned producers. Snow outside, a big help for our droughthy conditions, some more snow predicted for next week. We'll take it as it comes, in whatever shape or form. :P :D :D :-) :)
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE. FREEDOM IS BOUGHT AND PAID FOR BY THE BRAVE SO THE FREE CAN BE FREE.

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Kato
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Postby Kato » Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:05 pm

OK, here's something from hubby's Polish grandma. I don't even know what they are really called, but we call them Beet Buns. I promise you've never heard of them, but they are fantastic. There aren't a lot of 'measurements' in this recipe. It's one of those "a bit of this and a bit of that ones" where you just eyeball them when they are ready to bake and take out of the oven.

Wash young beet leaves straight from the garden.
Make (or buy, if you prefer) some dough such as bun or bread dough. It doesn't really matter which, because it always tastes good.

Roll each beet leaf up into a tube with about a tablespoon of dough in it. Layer them in a buttered pan or roaster and let them rise for about an hour. Drizzle them with melted butter and bake in a 350 degree oven for about a half hour to 45 minutes. Let them cool in the pan.

Now comes the good part....

Melt some butter in a big frying pan. Put the buns in it, and heat them up, stirring so they don't burn. When they are hot, sprinkle them with finely chopped green dill leaves. Next, pour cream over them, and stir for a minute while it sizzles, and soaks into the buns.

Eat them with sour cream.

They will make you famous. :D
Always drive the truck so you don't have to get out and open the gate.

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:33 pm

WOW! Can't wait to try your recipe out! Just a simple question, when rolling the beet leaf into a tube, what do you mean by "a tablespoon of dough in it? Is the dough actually in it or does it surround the leaf of beet greens? I might seem dumb, but I like to get my recipes straight. Thanks :-)
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.

I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'

-Ronald Reagan

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ranchwife
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Postby ranchwife » Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:27 am

sw wrote:ranchwife,
how did the meatballs go over? Did Jesse like his dinner? did he get another birthday Present? :wink: :wink:


not only did jesse love the meatballs, but so did the other 18 guests who came over that night....also, YES, jesse did get another birthday presents...i got impatient waiting for the other guests to leave so i put a big bow on my backside and told jesse that he got to unwrap "this" when everyone left...sure worked well!! :shock: :shock: :wink:
Love wins....ennis, montana....June 14, 2003!!!
Never forget!

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ranchwife
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Postby ranchwife » Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:40 am

alright already....my printer is down and i am getting writers cramp from copying down all these absolutely delicious recipes....i am predicting a change in my jean size by the time i get done sampling all these yummies!!! :lol: :wink: :shock:
Love wins....ennis, montana....June 14, 2003!!!

Never forget!

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Kato
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Postby Kato » Fri Mar 25, 2005 8:04 am

The beet leaves are wrapped around the dough. When it rises, it kind of sticks out the ends because it has nowhere else to go.

You can make them any size you like. With this recipe it doesn't seem to matter how you make them they always turn out! :D
Always drive the truck so you don't have to get out and open the gate.

mrj
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Postby mrj » Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:36 pm

Hope you get with it SOON, reader 2, those all sound great to me! I'm imagining what you put into all three of those........so will be interesting to see how far I miss it.

Your grandson must be about same age as our first grandchild, who will be 21 on my 65th birthday, July 24. He is in second year at our state Ag U.

MRJ

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Hanta Yo
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Postby Hanta Yo » Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:32 pm

Please share, Reader. Been testing some of these recipes all week. YUUUUMMMMM! Ole sw's got some pretty good 'uns, too. Here is a recipe for Kraut Burgers, they're like a "pocket bread" been around a long time. My family LOVES these things as you can throw them in the saddle bag with a bottle of water when you know you are going to be gone all day...

2 Lbs ground beef
1/2 head cabbage, sliced thinly and cut so pieces are approx 1"long
1 onion, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste.

Brown ground beef, add cabbage and onion, cook till cabbage and onion are tender. Add salt and pepper.


Meanwhile:

Make bread dough according to manuf directions (if you are a bread maker user) otherwise make bread dough, let rise til double, press out air bubbles. Roll this dough til 1/4 inch thick. Cut into 5" X 5" pieces. Place a couple tablespoons of meat mixture on the dough, fold over, seal the 3 edges. Let rise til double. Bake at 350 till browned just the way you like 'em. Let cool, these things freeze well. We usually take them right out of the freezer, put them in the saddle bag and by lunch time they are thawed out.

I've done this with ground beef and barbeque sauce (YUUMM!) I imagine you can use anything your heart desires (within reason!)
'It has been said that politics is the second oldest profession.

I have learned that it bears a striking resemblance to the first.'

-Ronald Reagan

Brad S
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Postby Brad S » Sat Mar 26, 2005 1:32 am

THis is what I make when its cold, and its cold here.

Call it hot pork or red pork or carnitas, whatever somebody will always correct you.

Sear 3 or 4 pounds trimmed pork - buy the cheap stuff if you're up to trimming it

Then put the pork and a half onion and 6 or 8 or 10 jalapinoes into a crock pot with barely enough water to cover it and cook completely.

When the pork is close to falling apart, add as much tomato sauce as there is water so that the tomato sauce + water will be about like tomato juice. Use more or less water or tomato sauce or tomato juice to find a tomatoness to your likeing.

Add about 3 tablespoons garlic and 1 tbs salt, a little cumin if you like. I use cumin in rice so I keep it out of the pork.

The only caution is scalding the tomato sauce/juice so keep the heat down and don't overcook after the tomato stuff is added.


Pretty good rice to go with the hot pork

*brown til you almost think its burnt 2 cups bleached white rice
*when the rice is almost browned add 1/4 cup finely chopped onions
*add 2 cups hot water - better yet use some of the pork stock from cooking the pork
*add 2 cups tomato sauce
*2 tbs garlic, 1 tbs salt, 1 tsp cumin 3 or 4 tbs ground up jalapinoes
simmer with a lid until almost done, then turn off stove and it will finish cooking if you leave the lid on it.


Plain old pinto beans
put a pound ina crock pot with a bunch of water and a little salt some garlic an onion and a few jalapinoes.


My wife says my mexican cooking is a bum magnate, all my rodeo bum friends know when I've been cooking.


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