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Done good on last batch of cattle to tyson

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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PPRM
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Done good on last batch of cattle to tyson

Postby PPRM » Thu Apr 21, 2005 8:41 pm

83 % graded choice (most were bought cattle, not out of my herd), 50% YG 1. Had some Charlais steers I bought for $385 each weighing 448 pounds a year ago January. These guys averaged a carcass weight of 904 pounds. All were Choice 1's. They brought me an average of $1370 each. There ya go mike, puff the chest, lol.

The rest of the cattle did well to,

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The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth

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Mike
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Re: Done good on last batch of cattle to tyson

Postby Mike » Fri Apr 22, 2005 5:12 am

PPRM wrote:83 % graded choice (most were bought cattle, not out of my herd), 50% YG 1. Had some Charlais steers I bought for $385 each weighing 448 pounds a year ago January. These guys averaged a carcass weight of 904 pounds. All were Choice 1's. They brought me an average of $1370 each. There ya go mike, puff the chest, lol.
The rest of the cattle did well to,
PPRM


Pat. 83% choice on bought cattle speaks volumes on your ability to pick'em. Was wondering about the age of those chars though. I haven't had any to take that long before being "ripe". It has been my experience that I do better going from weaning straight to a pre-con lot for about 2 months - then right to the feedlot. Time from birth to picking - 12 to 15 months. Did you put them out on grass for a good while? At $1370 each I wish you had sold a thousand!
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Postby PPRM » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:04 am

mike,

When I got these, they were 448 pounds, so I went after some frame with grass. I put them on feed at about 775 pounds. They were probably 18-24 months old. I don't think they had the best start from where they came from, but finished nicely.

I had one Angus cross steer from my own cattle close to them. He weighed 886 on the rail and graded Choice 2. Other than that, they were bought cattle. I attribute some of this percentage to them being in a small lot where I am allowed to sort and sell. I don't worry if I don't fill th load out, I just sort by what I think will grade. Last two months has been where you definetly don't want them to go to long.


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The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth



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Postby Chuckie » Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:41 pm

that's "The Kind" we like buyin' 'em and, believe it or not, we like payin' for 'em. :)

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Postby PPRM » Wed Apr 27, 2005 7:51 am

Chuckie,

I would have paid more, and in fact did the next week on some grey heifers. When I am the last one with my hand in the air at an auction, I usually don't run the bid on mysself, lol.

Interesting point is people talk about "marketing their cattle." Usually they are talking about getting a couple of buyers to bid. On these kind, I feel that they would be better to own them through and sell them to Tyson. Reason is that this particular flavor isn't "in style" in our area. I do know several guys that have found markets in the Mid west and ship these kind. However, most would be better of just to feed them and get paid premiums,


PPRM
The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth



PPRM

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Postby Chuckie » Wed Apr 27, 2005 8:50 pm

if i'm following you pprm, you're basically saying that the people "marketing" their cattle are just looking at that almighty dollar and not at the REAL bottom line. i have to agree; there are a number of things that need to be considered when one "markets" cattle, not the least of which is yield differerence vs. freight, grade difference vs. the freight, but that only matters if you're selling on the grade (potential premiums vs. dollars on delivery). and a feeder HAS to know their cattle, their feeding and implant program in order to make a GOOD marketing decision.

there are some smart people out there when it comes to selling their cattle, but there are a LOT that could be smarter.

are those heifers black-nosed chars?? if they are, i wish i could be the one to pay for 'em!!! i LOVE good cattle!

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Postby PPRM » Thu Apr 28, 2005 1:21 am

Hiefers are gone, some had calves in them. Weaned calves and the heifers didn't have the frame, but graded well. Those without calves did well.

I think everyone should sell at least some calves on the grid at some point. It really opens your eyes and does change some thought processes.

One reason I do well is I worked in a decent sized lot at one point and learned to sort. I feed at a small lot that lets me sort my own. Here's a secret I don't want too many to know. Tyson will take a gooseneck load.,

Why is that important??? Well, at a big lot, they take the top cut to fill a truck. My experience is filling out loads is the tal wagging the dog. On my deal, I sort out the ones that look to grade and put them in a gooseneck. That raises my percentage a lot. And, admittedly, I am small and need all the percentages to go my way.

Those calves I bought right after the BSE deal when everyone was running scared. Was a lot easier to pick and choose,

PPRM
The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth



PPRM


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