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Bad Wreck!!

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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preston
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Postby preston » Wed May 11, 2005 10:41 pm

Faster horses wrote:Preston, every rancher I know in these colder climates semen test their bulls every spring, just to make sure they are sound after going through the winter. Pretty common occurance around these parts. It's a a day you schedule just like branding day.

============
Faster Horses,

I understand...but for all handling of animals a safe process must be in place. No matter the reason to handle them.

We have a 2000# herd Angus...a reasonably gentle guy...but when we bring the herd up he is the challenger. He just stands around in the herd and looks for a weak spot...and if there is one he will always find it.

So..I must share this.... we took him on..and as the 200' lane curves into the last part before the headgate...we installed a gate...we open it...he sees it and takes off...other cows behind him...the gate is closed and by that time the followers' momentum moves him right on in. He falls for it every time..... the last 30 feet of our lane around the slight corner to the headgate is steel pipe rails...7'+ high and when he passes that point he becomes a docile big puppy dog, more so than any of the other bulls. We would never attempt to bring him in by himself..it would be a fight and require the dart gun. But I would never trust him or any of them. With the best of planning we all make mistakes.

It's usually not the animal that pays the price.
G. Preston
If you must doubt something,doubt your limits.

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Postby Northern Rancher » Wed May 11, 2005 11:43 pm

They did surgery to put a pin in his spine today-there gonna rifle that bull as soon as abbatoir can hang him.

Oldtimer

Postby Oldtimer » Thu May 12, 2005 12:40 am

Big Muddy rancher wrote:The job I hate the most in ranching is bull testing day and bull turn out. Running cows would be easy if you didn't have to breed the darn things.
Hope the fellow pulls thru this wreck, A person can never be to careful.


I have to agree with you on that Big Muddy...Last year a neighbor and I were trailing out bulls up the creek-- about a dozen bulls that we trailered up, but because of the wet spring then had to trail a couple miles to the pasture and spread out...First mile went good with the normal moaning and groaning from the bulls- but then we happened on an old cow carcass (just hide and bones)-- Those bulls went nuts- fighting and pawing and bellering--Just all a guy could do sometimes just to keep himself and horse from being run over in a bull fight--Finally got them by the carcass- and they still fought all the way the last mile....The smallest thing can change their attitude pretty fast........

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Postby HAY MAKER » Thu May 12, 2005 5:45 am

Oldtimer wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:The job I hate the most in ranching is bull testing day and bull turn out. Running cows would be easy if you didn't have to breed the darn things.
Hope the fellow pulls thru this wreck, A person can never be to careful.


I have to agree with you on that Big Muddy...Last year a neighbor and I were trailing out bulls up the creek-- about a dozen bulls that we trailered up, but because of the wet spring then had to trail a couple miles to the pasture and spread out...First mile went good with the normal moaning and groaning from the bulls- but then we happened on an old cow carcass (just hide and bones)-- Those bulls went nuts- fighting and pawing and bellering--Just all a guy could do sometimes just to keep himself and horse from being run over in a bull fight--Finally got them by the carcass- and they still fought all the way the last mile....The smallest thing can change their attitude pretty fast........


Reminds me of the time me and some mexicans were working some cows ,tagging,pouring etc.One ole cow got tagged wrong and bleed a little,one brangus bull 3 pens back musta smelled it and went wild torn down a pipe gate and proceeded to get after any and every thing he could.Stuff like that happen mighty fast,BECAREFUL& good luck

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Postby preston » Thu May 12, 2005 9:47 am

Northern Rancher wrote:They did surgery to put a pin in his spine today-there gonna rifle that bull as soon as abbatoir can hang him.

=====
Northern Rancher,

Sounds like good progress with the truma repair. Hope the prognosis is as encouraging.

Do you know if a review has been made as to exactly what went wrong? Did something fail....did he take un-necessary chances? Is the bull the ... cantankerous type...difficult to handle? Maybe we can all learn from it.

Hate to see a otherwise good bull harvested...but can understand the thinking.

It seems everything happens for a reason....often we don't understand.
G. Preston

If you must doubt something,doubt your limits.

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Postby Northern Rancher » Thu May 12, 2005 10:55 am

Those old exotic bulls from my experience once they get on the hunt there is no dealing with them-without alot of risk. This is a husband and wife operation -both in their 50's-she wants that bull gone when she gets back from the hospital dead or alive. A funny thing-my kids raise bucking bulls-yesterday we pregged about 30 head of brahma cross cows along with some just plain old black ranch cows-those buckers are wild but in some ways are easier to handle-they'll give you the eye but most times if you leave them an out they'll take it-I'd much rather work them than those @#$%%^%#$$ EXT's.

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Postby Faster horses » Thu May 12, 2005 11:01 am

Our daughter graduated from high school in 1981 and that year in W. Mt. we had a 100-year flood. A creek went down through our place and wreaked havoc all along the creek, even changing the creek channel.

We had found a bull with hoof rot and trailed him to the corrals. He had gone quite aways and he was hurting, but we went slow, kind of at his pace. We got into the corrals and the gate was left open by mistake (my mistake). Anyway, he went through the alley, out and across the creek into a little pasture with a lot of brush. He went into the brush. Our daughter,( unknown to us because we couldn't see her due to the bushes), got off her horse and went in on foot to get him out. He charged her and got her down. She started screaming and my husband got off his horse to go in to get her. He kept falling down, she kept screaming. Finally, her screams got the bull to back off and my husband was able to get ahold of her and drag/carry her out. He was an Angus bull and he had pushed her around so much he actually tore her clothes. She said his head looked as big as a house and he kept falling on her. She was bruised, and sore, and we learned later may have had a broken rib~didn't know it at the time. We figured all that saved her was that the ground was so soft from all the rain. Her hair had ringlets of mud all through it. Gives me chills to think about it now.

Later that day, my husband went back out to try to get the bull in, and the the bull pinned him and his horse up against a tree. Well, we just left him alone, got some good cowboys the next day. Three guys horseback got a rope on him and drug him into the trailer and we took him to town to the sale.

This bull had NEVER shown this tendency before. I am sure that the pain from the foot is what caused the problem. None-the-less, he could have killed someone had the situation been just a little different. It happens so fast. She was very fortunate. One of her comments was "I thought I was going to die young, that is why I got to do so much my sernior year." She was really scared, and rightfully so.

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Bad Wreck

Postby EJ » Thu May 12, 2005 11:16 am

Putting the dogs on those woofey bulls cools them down in a hurry. I`ve had horses knocked down trying to move them along before too. I does get a bit hairy.

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Postby Jinglebob » Thu May 12, 2005 11:28 am

My comment after reading all of this:

And people wonder why I like to run yearlings!

If there is a cow or bull on the fight, I am the most dangerous creature around, cuz' I'll run over anybody, getting out of the way!

Just ask my family and friends!

Hope the feller gets all healed up. We'll do some prayin' for him.
Toda via estoy aqui. I am still here.
website www.dennisranch.com

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Postby Northern Rancher » Thu May 12, 2005 2:11 pm

He was in surgery for 6 hours yesterday they took bone from his hip to recinstruct three crushed vertebrae then put a plate in-he's still in intensive care with his lungs full of fluid.

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Postby preston » Thu May 12, 2005 3:07 pm

Faster horses wrote:Our daughter graduated from high school in 1981 and that year in W. Mt. we had a 100-year flood. A creek went down through our place and wreaked havoc all along the creek, even changing the creek channel.

We had found a bull with hoof rot and trailed him to the corrals. He had gone quite aways and he was hurting, but we went slow, kind of at his pace. We got into the corrals and the gate was left open by mistake (my mistake). Anyway, he went through the alley, out and across the creek into a little pasture with a lot of brush. He went into the brush. Our daughter,( unknown to us because we couldn't see her due to the bushes), got off her horse and went in on foot to get him out. He charged her and got her down. She started screaming and my husband got off his horse to go in to get her. He kept falling down, she kept screaming. Finally, her screams got the bull to back off and my husband was able to get ahold of her and drag/carry her out. He was an Angus bull and he had pushed her around so much he actually tore her clothes. She said his head looked as big as a house and he kept falling on her. She was bruised, and sore, and we learned later may have had a broken rib~didn't know it at the time. We figured all that saved her was that the ground was so soft from all the rain. Her hair had ringlets of mud all through it. Gives me chills to think about it now.

Later that day, my husband went back out to try to get the bull in, and the the bull pinned him and his horse up against a tree. Well, we just left him alone, got some good cowboys the next day. Three guys horseback got a rope on him and drug him into the trailer and we took him to town to the sale.

This bull had NEVER shown this tendency before. I am sure that the pain from the foot is what caused the problem. None-the-less, he could have killed someone had the situation been just a little different. It happens so fast. She was very fortunate. One of her comments was "I thought I was going to die young, that is why I got to do so much my sernior year." She was really scared, and rightfully so.

=========
faster horses,

A blessing received for the daughter...no doubt! Amen!
G. Preston

If you must doubt something,doubt your limits.


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