Ranchers.net Bull Session

SEEMS TO BE DISAPPEARING

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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SASH
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Postby SASH » Mon Jun 06, 2005 4:27 pm

There was a city fellow who moved out down the road from us awhile back. His septic backed up on him so he phoned the municipality (county) to fix it for him. He was quite P'O'd that they refused to fix it. He lasted about six months before he moved back to the city. :???:
"Red meat is NOT bad for you. Now, blue-green meat - THAT'S bad for you!"

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ranchwife
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Postby ranchwife » Mon Jun 06, 2005 6:12 pm

SASH wrote:There was a city fellow who moved out down the road from us awhile back. His septic backed up on him so he phoned the municipality (county) to fix it for him. He was quite P'O'd that they refused to fix it. He lasted about six months before he moved back to the city. :???:


is that really all i have to do to get rid of these new neighbors???!!! :shock: :shock: if i had only known it was that easy..... :wink:
Love wins....ennis, montana....June 14, 2003!!!
Never forget!

Chuckie
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Postby Chuckie » Mon Jun 06, 2005 9:00 pm

i think a big part of the problem is easy money, want to"get away from it all", the beautiful country (at least in the summer) in the mountains, and there has to be someone to sell the property to these people right?

i can understand (to a point), a guy who's been losing $$ for years, getting an offer of (whatever--but a WHOLE lot more than he's ever gonna get out of it running stock cows), selling out. there has to be those kind, and they've surely been on the land a year or 2; they're your nieghbors, relations, usually in that kind of country: why aren't they being dissed for selling?

i understand, i think, where you guys are coming from, at least a little. but someone has to sell the land in the first place, and it's the 3rd-generation that's doing it. i would LOVE to not see those pukey homes going up in crazy woman--that is some AWESOME country (and it's fun for fishing :-) )--but what to do? how to stop it?

AND--you all will be there LONG after those pukey homes (i can just imagine them..) are long gone. mother nature takes care...

i'm off the old soapbox :roll:

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Faster horses
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Postby Faster horses » Mon Jun 06, 2005 9:35 pm

Hey, OT, those folks moved to E. Montana about 12 years ago, not twenty.

Time flies when you're having fun, huh? :wink:

Are you gonna answer that little lady's question about roping calves at branding?

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Northern Rancher
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Postby Northern Rancher » Mon Jun 06, 2005 11:28 pm

Faster Horses are they building houses up along that old trail that goes up Crazy Woman canyon-I sure hope not we got stuck up there 4 or 5 years ago with my esteemed guide Earl Nimick lol.

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Postby mrj » Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:21 am

Faster horses wrote:JB, wish I had read that article 25 or 30 years ago. How do you suppose the author knew that? That kind of stuff fascinates the heck out of me.

When folks came to hunt, the wives were usually anxious to get back to 'civilization' and usually what mama wants, mamma gets. So I didn't think our country (Wyoming, at the time) would ever catch on due to the women folk.


What is your opinion. Why did it happen? I have an opinion of sorts, but don't know if I am even close.


FH, we knew a guy many years ago who said pretty much the same thing, and I think maybe it was professors in the college he attended were floating that idea. He became a school teacher, and believed we would live to see the day when even rural northern SD plains would be full of houses with commuters flying in to Minneapolis or cities further away to work, maybe just coming home for weekends was the scenario, as I recall. Sadly, he died young and did not live to see it. Wonder about the rest of us? Doubt I will, being nearly 65, buy my children may.
While I don't like what it may do to ranching as we know it, I can, from the viewpont of those building on those "20 acre ranchettes" see why they want to badly to live like that. If I couldn't live on a reasonably remote ranch, that would be next best thing. I would have great difficulty enjoying life with a quarter acre or less for my "homestead".

MRJ
MRJ

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nr
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Postby nr » Tue Jun 07, 2005 3:48 am

This problem isn't really new. It began in the east coast and continues- we see rich farmland go under to development every month and everyone groans.
But if we must place blame, then place it on the USA.
The USA has become a magnet because it has a stable government and is the land of opportunity. Despite what some nay-sayers would say about our problems, we're still attractive to immigrants because it is a wonderful country for those who want to work hard.

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Jinglebob
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Postby Jinglebob » Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:05 am

[quote="jackim"]Can anybody here tell me how -- in the olden days -- a cowboy roped a calf for branding?

Thanks so much.
Cowboy's daughter[/quote]

I'm not sure if I understand what you want. But I will try to answer your question.

The oldtimers roped calves just as we do today. By the neck or the hind feet, depending on where you were at and what you wanted to achieve.

Check out the pictures in "Before Barbed Wire" by LA Huffman.

Usually, the bigger calves were/are roped by the heels in the high Plains states. Tho' there are exceptions.

In Texas many/most calves are roped around the neck for branding. If the ground is rough, a calf roped by the neck and brought to the fire, doesn't get the hair knocked off as easy. Bigger calves are easier to handle if roped by the hind feet. In California and in the "buckaroo" regions, the calves are roped around the neck and the heels and afte they are layed down on the ground, the rope is taken off from the neck and put around the front feet and both ropes are held by horses. Every method might be used at any branding.

At the majority of brandings in the northern plains, the calves are roped by the heels and drug out to "wrestlers" who take the rope off and hold the calf on the ground for the branding and vaccinating and any other work that needs to be done.

Hope this answers your question.
Toda via estoy aqui. I am still here.
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DOC HARRIS
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Postby DOC HARRIS » Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:09 pm

Faster horses wrote:JB, wish I had read that article 25 or 30 years ago. How do you suppose the author knew that? That kind of stuff fascinates the heck out of me.

When folks came to hunt, the wives were usually anxious to get back to 'civilization' and usually what mama wants, mamma gets. So I didn't think our country (Wyoming, at the time) would ever catch on due to the women folk.


What is your opinion. Why did it happen? I have an opinion of sorts, but don't know if I am even close.
Faster horses - I can give you my opinion - and it comes from someone who has seen the transition from Rural Heaven to Urban Hell! I have lived from small town to Farm to larger town to Ranch to large city to Los Angeles (HELL) to back to God's Front Yard (Colorado's Front Range Area). When people get enough money and time to escape the City's insane, maniacal inhabitants - ZIP - they are back to the rural environment, and it says, in big BLACK words -"TOO MANY PEOPLE - EVERYWHERE"! There it is - for what it's worth.

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Northern Rancher
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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Jun 07, 2005 11:17 pm

Were lucky up here-beautiful country but hardly any people all things considered-I guess 7 months of winter weeds a few out lol.


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