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Sell Calves?

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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Manitoba_Rancher
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Postby Manitoba_Rancher » Tue Feb 22, 2005 12:15 pm

Dont think I would shoot a cow unless she had cancer eye or a broken leg. After the financial impact we ve had over the past months, $200 is $200 and helps to pay bills. The US I dont think will see a large price drop. There are American buyers buying cattle up here already and its helping the price but I think these cattle will be fed up here. As for R-calfers blocking the border, If the bull haulers have enough speed, when the R-calfers hit the grill it will feel no more than a bug hitting the windshield! geeze maybe I should hook up the Freightliner to the pot and go haul cattle for a bit. Id love to have some R-calfers in my headlights!
Just hit a higher gear and watch them scatter! :wink:

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Clarence
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Postby Clarence » Tue Feb 22, 2005 12:34 pm

Some time back Agman posted that if we do not re-gain the Japanese market, when the border opens we will experience a price drop of from $6.50 to $10 cwt. In about 2 weeks we most likely will find out if he is right. Even if the Japanese decide to take our beef it will be a long time before we can export there at the same level as we did before Dec. 2003.

One positive thing I see is that the last two BSE cows found in Canada has not done anything to hurt consumer confidence. If one was found in the US now it would have little effect either.

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Postby Oldtimer » Tue Feb 22, 2005 12:53 pm

CattleAnnie wrote:
Q. If you discovered one of your cows wobbling around in the pasture, how eager would you (as an American producer and seeing the impact that BSE positive cattle have made on the Canadian cattle industry) be to have that cow tested?

Q. Also, would you (not trying to imply anything untoward, but as a vote of confidence in the USDA BSE testing system) volunteer to send an additional sample from that same cow to an independant lab - say Great Britain.


CattleAnnie- I don't know for sure what I'd do- situation hasn't arose yet... I know there has been no push or program locally for testing anything on farm--I don't even know if they are lined up to take samples- I know I probably wouldn't if I had to pay the vet bill and the testing cost- just to have it probably come back rabies.....


I have no problem with USDA using a second lab for retesting positives- Anything that reduces the perception of impropriety.......

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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:30 pm

Oldtimer your wrong again. I have three cows covered up in the stack yard waiting for results they are 9 and 10 yr olds. One silipped on the ice and died one wobbliy on back end and one chronic lump. BSE is our pboblem and we have to deal with it. we exceeded our testing last year and will again this year. :cowboy:
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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:38 pm

We tested 5 here too-ohh telll leo he can breath again the bull i bought from him tested negative.

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Postby Bull Burger » Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:54 pm

I think USDA could have handled the border opening a little better by using a number of cattle per week with their starting date. Such as 1000 per week first week, 2000 per week second week, etc. That way any real or perceived "wall" of cattle wouldn't have affected markets much.

Also think the markets have built in pricing for the border opening as much as possible. Heard Johnny Smith say prices could drop 25% on March 7 and later heard it repeated by other auction operators. You wonder what they tell the buyers on their seats on sale day. :?

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Postby S.S.A.P. » Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:56 pm

Oldtimer- "I know there has been no push or program locally for testing anything on farm--I don't even know if they are lined up to take samples- I know I probably wouldn't if I had to pay the vet bill and the testing cost- just to have it probably come back rabies..... "


As per the USDA site: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bs ... g/faq.html

The goal of the program is to test as many cattle from the high-risk population as possible in a 12- to 18-month period. In order to reach as many high-risk cattle as possible, samples will be taken from the farm, slaughter facilities, rendering facilities, livestock auctions, veterinary clinics, and public health laboratories.

The goal of the enhanced surveillance program is to provide consumers, trading partners, and industry increased assurances about animal health, specifically whether BSE exists in the U.S. cattle population and if so, at what level.

A. USDA personnel will collect samples from high-risk cattle and send the samples to an existing network of state and Federal laboratories approved to conduct rapid-testing for BSE.
Samples will be collected from any of the following locations:

State- or federally inspected slaughter establishments
Custom-exempt slaughter establishments
Farms
Rendering facilities
Veterinary diagnostic laboratories
Animal feed slaughter facilities (pet food plants)
Public health laboratories
Veterinary clinics
APHIS needs cooperation from its many partners in this intensive testing program. To reach our goal, it is essential that animals identified as high-risk cattle are reported in a timely fashion so that viable samples can be collected.

To report high-risk animals, call APHIS’ toll–free number 1–866–536–7593. You will be connected to the Area Veterinarian-in-Charge and given instructions on how to proceed.

Q. What are high-risk animals?

A. Experience in Europe has shown that testing high-risk cattle is the method most likely to identify BSE if it is present. Therefore, USDA has tailored its testing program to collect the majority of samples from the following categories:

Nonambulatory cattle;
Cattle exhibiting signs of a central nervous system disorder;
Cattle exhibiting other signs that may be associated with BSE, such as emaciation or injury; and
Dead cattle.
USDA personnel will also sample all cattle condemned on ante-mortem inspection by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.


How many "rabid" cows have you had Oldtimer?
Have you contacted the 1-800 to ask if you have to pay the vet and testing?
You must have missed all the media releases about:
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has implemented an intensive national testing program for BSE.

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S.S.A.P.
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Re: Sell Calves?

Postby S.S.A.P. » Tue Feb 22, 2005 2:40 pm

Buckskin wrote:I have some 2004 calves left. Should I sell before Mar 7? What is the market going to do. Some say down big time and others say not much impact. What do you think Oldtimer? Anybody else have a idea, including our Canadian friends? :???:


Buckskin
This won't be a fancy answer - but in any circumstance where a rumoured fall in prices is going to happen, what do alot of folks do? They panic a little (or a lot) and dump or sell more than they would in a stable market. So you have this rumour (all sorts of predictions on how far it will fall, for how long ...), you sell, and quite afew more do. What happens when a bunch of livestock starts trading (over-supply vs normal selling). Prices are going to drop. But how much of the price can be contributed to the influx of cattle (panic selling) suddenly hitting the market and how much can be blamed on the open border ?? Then factor in all the other variables - feedlot capacity/type needed, weather, $ consumers are willing to part with and for what kind of beef, ....etc...etc.

I wish you success in whichever direction you choose.

Oldtimer

Postby Oldtimer » Tue Feb 22, 2005 4:34 pm

S.S.A.P. wrote:


How many "rabid" cows have you had Oldtimer?


SSAP- We have only had one case about 40 years ago- altho there may have been more, because many times when you finally find the cow they are just a pile of bones- never know what killed them.... But I have seen and been called to several cases- know of one fellow that had 2 cases in one year....

And rabies is nothing to play around with- pretty contagious if you get near enough to be in contact with the saliva-- I've seen several people and even a whole family that had to go thru the old rabies shots series because they had not known what they had and tried to doctor the critter- and exposed themselves to the disease...

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Manitoba_Rancher
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Postby Manitoba_Rancher » Tue Feb 22, 2005 7:41 pm

BMR,

Im the same way I have a couple covered up in snow in the stack yard.. I call it the deep freeze! hOPE TO GET RESULTS BACK THIS WEEK!

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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Feb 22, 2005 8:27 pm

The last person to die of rabies in Canada was one of my sister's friends in highschool-a bat bite-so it definately isn't to be taken lightly.

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Postby cowsense » Tue Feb 22, 2005 9:33 pm

Buckskin & Oldtimer; THE only thing that will affect the markets on March 7 is the credibility of the exagerations and outright lies that have been brought forward against the Canadian industry. If fear overrules common sense who should shoulder the blame? I for one don't feel many feeder calves will move south. We have mountains of nearly worthless, unmarketable feed ( frost damaged) and our cost of gain is lower ; our dollar has appreciated considerably; trucking capacity is diminished and the new border protocols will be a hassle. Our slaughter capacity is expanding and they'll have to be competitive to US plants to retain kill levels. Last I heard the Alberta plants were only killing 4 days a week, not enough fats right now !
On the surveillance front the CFIA is getting excellent response ( over 5000 4d tests in Jan. alone). We just put down 4 old subject cows for testing and as expected they came back negative. Our industry is pulling out all the stops to put this disease behind us in a responsible and scientifically approved manner. That is how markets are regained!


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