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Grass seed in the mineral

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Big Muddy rancher
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Grass seed in the mineral

Postby Big Muddy rancher » Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:35 am

Grassfarmer mentioned that he renews pastures by putting a legume seeds in his mineral and lets the cattle distribute for him. Great idea and i want to try this. Has anybody tried it in drier climates? From where he lives to me is like the difference between western and eastern Montana or maybe Harding county SD to a corn field in Iowa.
Where I live we don't really have topsoil. Do you think I could get some alfalfa started in some old Crested Wheat stands?
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Postby Grassfarmer » Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:05 am

I don't know how it would work in your drier climate BMR but I'd sure try it. We have had best success under our conditions with alsike clover, very good with red clover too but complete failure with cicer milk vetch. A guy 25 miles away had great success with cicer milk vetch. I have never tried alfalfa as I prefer to work with clovers.
I think this system suits some seeds better than others but in general I think it would be a good way to establish new plants and might even work better for you in drier conditions with a less dense thatch on the ground surface. The seeds are sown in a ready made moisture/fertility package and we quite often come on an old manure patty with clover growing out of it like a patch of cress. The beauty of the alsike is the cost/seed numbers per lb. We paid $1.95/lb for seed and alsike has around 1.5 million seeds per pound!! It's a cheap way to reseed.

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Postby PATB » Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:11 am

Anik alfalfa

http://www.spiritviewranch.com/classifieds.htm

I do not know if you can get the seed out of canada but this variety of alfalfa sounds interesting.

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Postby Grassfarmer » Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:15 am

Yes, I was interested in that too - sent him an email a couple of years ago and I'm still waiting :roll:

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Postby Northern Rancher » Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:56 pm

BMR in your country I'd try it first with plain old sweet clover-it will grow on a gravel pile and the seed id pretty cheap as far as I know.sprinkling seed around your salt boxes works pretty good as long as you keep moving them.

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Postby Silver » Mon Apr 13, 2009 2:48 pm

It's awful dry and not much topsoil here either. I've been meaning to try it for some time as I've seen neighbours have good success with alsike / red clover. Around here it would be in bush pastures so it doesn't seem to me that alfalfa would be a good bet, but try a little and see what you get I suppose.

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Postby RSL » Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:11 pm

I know of quite a bit of Cicer Milkvetch that was seeded that way.
We have had great luck with topdressing alfalfa seed on the the manure spreader.
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Postby PATB » Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:06 pm

A blast from the past. Has anyone tried Anik Alfalfa or know where seed might be available in the US?

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Postby nortexsook » Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:56 pm

How about sweet clover? Any varieties that might be good for west Texas?
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Postby mrj » Wed Jan 16, 2013 3:25 pm

Does anyone know if that Anik alfalfa is related to the Falcata alfalfa developed at SD State University many years ago? I believe it was from stands found in NW area of SD, planted by farmers who emigrated from Russia.

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Postby Aaron » Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:25 pm

A neighbor of mine tried Anik and really liked it. Very fine and soft, loaded with leaves. Hardiness is yet to be determined.

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Postby PureCountry » Wed Jan 16, 2013 5:12 pm

I have tried Anik alfalfa, and love it. We seeded it in some absolute blowsand that had a pH of 4.8, and organic matter levels around 0.5%. It caught, and with careful grazing and long rests for the first 2 years, it is highly productive in a stand with another variety of alfalfa and some meadow brome. The stand is now 6 years old and more productive than ever. It's not a heavy yielding hay variety due its small, fine stems and leaves, but is excellent for grazing. Responds well, and is extremely hardy, very tolerant of grazing and/or winters.

Seed came from Peter Lundgard at Grimshaw in the Peace Country of Alberta. He's a good friend of mine and sells alfalfa seed and cutter bees all over Western Canada. If anyone wants his number just msg me.

In sandy soil you almost always have a low pH, so clovers don't do well usually. We've had good luck establishing alfalfas and milkvetch through mineral, although it's patchy at best, which is to be expected. I like doing it in patches of buckbrush, silver willow, leafy sphurge or any other "undesirable", so you can get something competitve there working for you. The hoof action, manure and urine in those concentrated areas always helps with establishment of course.

I've posted pics before of the alfalfa/meadow brome stands we established in the sandy field, and it all had Anik alfalfa in it.
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