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Old Cows

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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shorthorn
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Postby shorthorn » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:28 pm

We keep a mineral out year round to these cows and keep our last grass for spring. That way they are getting as i call it old filler growth mixed with new growth. We try and sometimes this is hard to do but we try to make sure our stockpiled grass is still growing when the frost hits it. That way it doesant get over mature. This is a fescue ladino mix. We havent had much luck on anything else orchard grass does okay but not as good as the fescue. The ladino clover will be there durn near all winter so that is a big help. The cows will look 10 times better than if they were on hay for the reason the fescue if stockpiled right is a lot better feed standing than in the bale. I did feed some tubs last winter for about 2 weeks when we had a lot of ice and heavy fogs off the river. But i went from feeding 450 bales a year to 25 or so counting the bull pens and feeder pens. So my accountant thinks i am learning something anyway.

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shorthorn
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Postby shorthorn » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:30 pm

We run about 50 fall calvers on this and our weaning weight are lighter than our spring calvers but who cares?

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the_jersey_lilly_2000
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Postby the_jersey_lilly_2000 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:33 pm

OK well that makes sense. Thanks for explainin that. Wish we had enuff ground to try somethin like that....
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Northern Rancher
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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:40 pm

Lily just electric fence off a few acres that you usually hay and try it.

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the_jersey_lilly_2000
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Postby the_jersey_lilly_2000 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:45 pm

Can't, our hayfield is outside the fence with a train tracks between it and the pasture. We are in the process tho of cross fencing. So maybe when that gets further along we can try it there.
Life is a roller coaster.

You can either scream every time you hit a bump or you can throw your hands up in the air and enjoy it!

¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸

"Ever day's a good day, just some are better'n others"

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Northern Rancher
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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:52 pm

I forgot to tell you Lily you have a twin sister up here lol.

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the_jersey_lilly_2000
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Postby the_jersey_lilly_2000 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:57 pm

I do? :shock:
Life is a roller coaster.

You can either scream every time you hit a bump or you can throw your hands up in the air and enjoy it!

¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸

"Ever day's a good day, just some are better'n others"

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Northern Rancher
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Postby Northern Rancher » Tue Aug 30, 2005 11:04 pm

Yes maam looks almost exactly like you.

DOC HARRIS
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Postby DOC HARRIS » Tue Aug 30, 2005 11:07 pm

the_jersey_lilly_2000 wrote:Can't, our hayfield is outside the fence with a train tracks between it and the pasture. We are in the process tho of cross fencing. So maybe when that gets further along we can try it there.
Many, many years ago this 'stockpiling' idea was tried in central Missouri by some of the larger acreage farmers, and if they ran dry cows on it it was okay - IF - they had good combination grass and clover. Most of the clover there was Lespedeza, and that did - okay - and that is about all. Nowadays the varieties and combinations are so much better than they were then that I think it is a marvelous idea. I don't know how Buffalo Grass or Bluestem or Crested Wheatgrass or Smooth Brome with Birdsfoot Trefoil or some othere compatible clover would work in the West. Does anyone stockpile for fall and winter grazing in the Sandhills or Montana, Wyoming or Colorado now? What mixtures do you use if you are doing that?
Last edited by DOC HARRIS on Tue Aug 30, 2005 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Haytrucker
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Postby Haytrucker » Tue Aug 30, 2005 11:12 pm

Sorry to redirect but; In 98 or 99 we went to McGinleys dispersal in Gordon. We got there late ( I didn't know where the sale barn was) and had missed the two's and three's; they were selling solid-mouth cows after we got our number. We sat there about 15 minutes, and they cut three cows back to make somebody's load even. I don't remember if they cost $620 or $640, but I had spotted a neighbor, and I hoped his trailer wasn't full yet.
It wasn't. I hired him to do my trucking, which consisted of mostly waiting on a "ground-loader" trying to load 33 open-range Red-Angus looking cows to go to South Dakota. He must of been used to milder cows, because he tried three times before he finally sorted and gated them. I offered my neighbor a drink in the meantime, but he politely declined. We were next, and the chute help was tickled to see 24' backing up for three cows.
On his way home, he swung 225 yards off to the right, pulled through my gate, and we turned 'em loose! in 200 acres. I was in front on the scooter, and thanks to pretty hilly ground, they wore out about the property line.
I didn't check cows for three days (Feb, no calves even close) and when they saw the pickup, it had a bale on the back. By calving time I was able to tag all three of their calves, two on the way out (almost) and the third underneath my 86 F-250. They had calmed down alot!
My point is, relative to this post, when I bought 'em, they wore an 8, a 6, and a 4, on their left shoulders. And no she wasn't 4 or 5 .
One had two calves and checked (they setteled down) open; one lost her third calf, and I shipped her, and one had six calves for us, and brought $945 in Jan, 2004; bred.
Her shoulder read "4".

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the_jersey_lilly_2000
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Postby the_jersey_lilly_2000 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 11:12 pm

Well I'd think it would really work well here, since we usually always have growth thru the winters because our winters are mild. Trees loose their leaves but what grass is there is green most of the time.

edit:
Just did a search. and with our grass here..this is what I found.

The stargrasses/bermudagrasses are the forages that least lend themselves to stockpiling. They are very sensitive to frost and freezing temperatures, and once exposed to these conditions become unpalatable within days and offer little nutrition until they grow back in the spring. These grasses need to be fertilized with a complete formula (56-28-56 lb/A N-P2O5-K2O) in September and grazed relatively hard, but maintaining a stubble, until frosted. These grasses will grow all winter in the warmer, frost-free areas of south Florida. In these areas stargrasses/bermuda grasses need to be managed to prevent overgrazing, but not stockpiled.
Life is a roller coaster.

You can either scream every time you hit a bump or you can throw your hands up in the air and enjoy it!

¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸¸.•*´¨`*•.¸

"Ever day's a good day, just some are better'n others"

Tully
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Postby Tully » Wed Aug 31, 2005 12:10 am

I know a chap who runs 800 top santa cows & he age brands all of the females, his ritual is to sell all cows at 7 yrs rising 8 after he weans their 5th calf . His reasoning being that if you cannot produce a replacement heifer in those 5 calves that is better than her mother then you are not going ahead.I can tell you that when he lines up 140 odd cows genuine 7yr old & heavy in calf they look & sell very well indeed.I have got into the ritual with our wagyu cattle of joining angus heifers then as they begin calving I put an angus bull in with them , we wean the calves at 4 months onto irrigated pasture ,freshen up the mother for a few months ,preg test them & sell them . I dont know about your markets but a rising 3yr old angus female preg tested in calf for her 2nd calf always makes ridiculous money over here.The calves we either export to Japan live or sell to feedlots here that feed for that market.The calving ease of the wagyu is a dream to behold we don'ty go any where near them whilst they are calving,just manage them with a pair of binoculars.The upshot being we pay about $450 for heifer calves at about 8-9months ,get a calf out of them (average about $850) & sell the female for between $800-$1000 so we get two bites of the cherry & we find we get into less binds during dry spells as everything can be sold without crueling our enterprise.
Just a different slant on breeding
regards
Tully
ps we are thinking of you in the gulf states at this awful time lets hope the worst is over.
Most people find A breed they like & try to make money from them.....me, I found A breed there is A lot of money in & i'am slowly begining to like them......marble on!!!


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