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Antibiotic free meat

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
turning grass into beef
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Antibiotic free meat

Postby turning grass into beef » Sun Oct 30, 2016 8:51 pm

My wife is on Facebook. I am not. She came across this post a few days ago (It had a few pictures with it). It is from 2015 by someone named Dusty Hahn. I thought is was well written. I will copy and paste it below.

Dear #Subway, #Chipotle, and all #safefood advocates,
This is a steer calf that was weaned off my ranch, and came to my feedlot a couple days ago. His official ID is 0609, because that is his mother's ear tag number. His momma called him "Moo," but I don't speak cow, so his nickname is Dave. Anyway, it seems Dave contracted foot rot. He got it out on the open range. It's nasty stuff. Like athlete's foot on steroids. It's a bacterial infection. Its scientific name is infectious pododermatitis. Look it up. The definition includes phrases like: "It is extremely painful and contagious," and, "It can be treated with a series of medications, but if not treated, the whole herd can become infected." Yikes! I don't like the sounds of any of that! But luckily, I'm an expert at treating foot rot. So, I captured young Dave in the head catch. He didn't like it much, but anything has to be better than suffering from this foot rot. So, I cleaned out the area between his toes, and as the pic shows... yep, just as I suspected... foot rot. Luckily, since foot rot is a bacterial infection, I have a product called oxytetracycline that is FDA approved for the treatment of foot rot. The product I use is called Bio-Mycin 200. It has an approved dosage amount, which is conveniently located on the label. So, since Dave weighs 550#, he gets 25 milliliters of antibiotic. But, according to Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) guidelines, he can't have more than 10 milliliters of antibiotic in any injection site. Furthermore, Bio-Mycin is labeled, and again approved by the FDA, for administration by intramuscular (in the muscle tissue), subcutaneous (under the skin, between skin and muscle tissue), or intravenous (in a vein, directly into the blood stream) injection. Since I'm a BQA guy, I always opt for the sub Q (under the skin) route whenever possible. So, Dave got 3 injections of about 8 milliliters of oxytet under his skin in the neck area. No antibiotic went into the muscle tissue, and even if it did, Dave's going to be living with me for the next 150 days. The withdrawl period on oxytet is a whopping 28 days. Which means that his system will clear the antibiotic out in a MONTH! That means Dave will be drug-free for over 4 months when he leaves my ranch!! Yay! I could have chosen not to help Dave out, but that just seems WRONG! Plus, since foot rot is extremely contagious, I would just as soon not have his counterparts contracting it, too. I can post another video in 10 days or 2 weeks, but I guarantee that Dave will not be limping, will not be in pain, and will be as healthy as all his buddies. And, that is why I will continue to use antibiotics responsibly and judiciously at my ranch.
#ranchlife #Montana #agriculture #rancherscare
#beef
"I've never been rich enough to be able to afford poor bulls" - Northern Rancher

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Faster horses
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Re: Antibiotic free meat

Postby Faster horses » Sun Oct 30, 2016 9:30 pm

What a great illustration. Even without the video, anyone would get the picture. Thanks for sharing!
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Big Muddy rancher
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Re: Antibiotic free meat

Postby Big Muddy rancher » Sun Oct 30, 2016 10:13 pm

Good message.
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George
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Re: Antibiotic free meat

Postby George » Mon Oct 31, 2016 4:58 am

I have never heard it told better!
Watch your thoughts, they become your words.
Watch your words, they become your actions.
Watch your actions, they become your habits.
Watch your habits, they become your character.
Watch your character, it becomes your destiny.

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Re: Antibiotic free meat

Postby WB » Mon Oct 31, 2016 5:43 am

Excellent way to explain necessary use of antibiotic. The same story could be told of BRD treatment.

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Re: Antibiotic free meat

Postby rancherfred » Mon Oct 31, 2016 8:22 am

I was recently to a wedding for a classmate in Oklahoma City that had several reporters and journalists from all over the country. That question came up, "What about antibiotic free non-hormone beef in the Whole Foods that I go to?" I answered that I thought it was immoral to have a treatment that we know works and refuse to use it in order to indulge misguided or ignorant people. I didn't use those words, but the reporter that I was visiting with seemed to understand the point when it was put in terms of ethics or morality. To me that is the biggest issue at hand with regards to the antibiotic question. If we have a treatment we know works and we refuse to use it I think we are betraying our responsibility as caretakers if we don't do everything we can to alleviate suffering and illness.

That framing of the discussion seems to work and it has the added benefit of being true. I was the only rancher there and probably the only rancher most of those folks had ever met. To say I felt like a circus freak is putting it mildly. Another one of my classmates went with me and he had a great time telling these gullible folks that we name all of our animals and when it is cold we go put sweaters on them so they stay warm, etc, etc. Half my time was spent dealing with the yarns that he was spinning. It was a real eye opener for me to see how incredibly ignorant most of the rest of the country is of our profession.


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