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Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:38 am
by Faster horses
Such good information. I knew you guys would have some great ideas. THANK YOU!! I will pass all this along.

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:11 pm
by Big Muddy rancher
littlejoe wrote:Whoops! angus said it while I was hunting and pecking.............ah well-great minds work alike...



".ah well-great minds work alike.." My Mother had a little more to that old saying. :D :D :cowboy:

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:32 pm
by littlejoe
Big Muddy rancher wrote:
littlejoe wrote:Whoops! angus said it while I was hunting and pecking.............ah well-great minds work alike...



".ah well-great minds work alike.." My Mother had a little more to that old saying. :D :D :cowboy:


As did my grandma--but darned if I can remember it. I do remember:" What's for supper, Grandma?"
"Pig's ass and cabbage---and damned little cabbage~!"

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:41 am
by farmguy
Here in Minnesota I have good luck grazing very short in late fall. Then go in with a no till drill in early March or as soon as possible and no till in red clover and alfalfa. Then let it get some growth before again strip grazing.

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 7:25 am
by LCP
One of my college professors did some research on interseeding legumes into grass stands a few years back. Here's the abstract to the research project:


Sod suppression is necessary for successful establishment of legumes interseeded into existing pasture; however such techniques vary in their effectiveness, cost, and management. Sod suppression experiments for legume interseeding into cool-season pasture were conducted at South Dakota State University's Cow-Calf Unit located near Brookings, SD in 2003 to 2005. We evaluated (i) spring burn, (ii) field cultivator or disk, (iii) herbicide, (iv) heavy fall and spring graze, and (v) a control with no sod suppression. Legume species were alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil, and kura clover. Sod suppression techniques enhanced the success of legume interseeding. In this study, the grazing equaled or was better than herbicide as a sod suppression technique. Field cultivating, disking or spring burning did not enhance the success of legume establishment. Alfalfa had a greater establishment in the drier year of 2003. Birdsfoot trefoil had greater establishment in the wetter year of 2004. Kura clover was not successful in establishment. Costs of sod suppression techniques varied from $0 per acre (grazing) to $13.30 per acre (herbicide). Management of sod suppression techniques is important to provide a long enough window for legumes to establish with minimal competition from existing grass. Managers can choose the sod suppression technique and legume that fits their resources, skills, and comfort level to achieve successful legume interseeding.

Sod Suppression Techniques for Legume Interseeding1 (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... erseeding1 [accessed Sep 6, 2017].

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 7:55 am
by Big Muddy rancher
I would like to try Cicer Milk Vetch, from what I understand once established it will take over from grass rather then fade away. Might not work as well in our dry climate. It also matures later then Alfalfa.

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:10 am
by Faster horses
LCP wrote:One of my college professors did some research on interseeding legumes into grass stands a few years back. Here's the abstract to the research project:


Sod suppression is necessary for successful establishment of legumes interseeded into existing pasture; however such techniques vary in their effectiveness, cost, and management. Sod suppression experiments for legume interseeding into cool-season pasture were conducted at South Dakota State University's Cow-Calf Unit located near Brookings, SD in 2003 to 2005. We evaluated (i) spring burn, (ii) field cultivator or disk, (iii) herbicide, (iv) heavy fall and spring graze, and (v) a control with no sod suppression. Legume species were alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil, and kura clover. Sod suppression techniques enhanced the success of legume interseeding. In this study, the grazing equaled or was better than herbicide as a sod suppression technique. Field cultivating, disking or spring burning did not enhance the success of legume establishment. Alfalfa had a greater establishment in the drier year of 2003. Birdsfoot trefoil had greater establishment in the wetter year of 2004. Kura clover was not successful in establishment. Costs of sod suppression techniques varied from $0 per acre (grazing) to $13.30 per acre (herbicide). Management of sod suppression techniques is important to provide a long enough window for legumes to establish with minimal competition from existing grass. Managers can choose the sod suppression technique and legume that fits their resources, skills, and comfort level to achieve successful legume interseeding.

Sod Suppression Techniques for Legume Interseeding1 (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... erseeding1 [accessed Sep 6, 2017].

Very interesting. I'll check it out! Thanks!

Re: Question on seeding alfalfa into grass stand

Posted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:11 am
by Faster horses
Big Muddy rancher wrote:I would like to try Cicer Milk Vetch, from what I understand once established it will take over from grass rather then fade away. Might not work as well in our dry climate. It also matures later then Alfalfa.


I will check on that too. Wonder how nutritious it is? Is it palatable?