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4th time under a saddle...and a wreck. Now what?

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LCP
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4th time under a saddle...and a wreck. Now what?

Postby LCP » Tue Mar 20, 2012 5:47 pm

I have a question for those of you who are experienced horse breakers. I am in the process of breaking a 3 yr old gelding. This is pretty much my first time breaking a horse myself. Things were going well until today - had a bit of a wreck.

Today was the 4th time putting the saddle on. The first two times went pretty well. Last time he bucked quite a little but settled down. Today he pulled away before I got the cinch fastened. You can imagine how that ended up. Calamity. Thankfully he didn't hurt himself or the saddle or me.

So my question is, how do I proceed now? How long should I wait to saddle him up again? Any suggestions on how to do it better next time are appreciated.

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leanin' H
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Postby leanin' H » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:36 pm

Well you can't let him win. I would tie him good in a spot he can't hurt himself and saddle him and leave him saddled for half a day. You'll have to watch him but he's gotta learn you run the show. I am a huge fan of sacking a horse out and then using a rope to create pressure points which he has to yeild to. I am sure you have a system that you are following. Remember that going slower makes it go faster. And a horse throws a fit for a reason that makes sense to him while not neccesarily us. :D If he learns bad behavior = pressure (which he dislikes) and good behavior = the pressure ceasing, he will be fine. Good luck, be safe and keep us posted. :D
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Postby JF Ranch » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:41 pm

How much time do you have? If time is short, I'd advise finding a trainer. You cannot hurry this thing. Good luck though, good ones are few and far between and they aren't cheap.

If you have lots of time, you need to start over. As a beginner, I suggest you start watching RFD-TV. Clinton Anderson, Pat Parelli, Chris Cox, Craig Cameron and others have excellent programs on how to go about it. Each of them have DVD's for sale and they are excellent but I tend to like Anderson's techniques. They will cost less than a trainer, but you will need to view them over & over while you try what you've learned. In a nutshell, you need to get your horse's respect in some simple yet specific ways. A two year old might have been a better choice to start with. I like to start working with them as yearlings.
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Postby LCP » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:50 pm

The pressure and release concept is what I've been using with great results. This is really the first problem I've had at all. It really is amazing how fast they can learn. I'm just hoping that this bad experience can be overcome.

The first couple times I saddled him I used an old busted saddle with no stirrups and he did very well. These last two times when he acted up I was using my normal saddle which is heavier and maybe feels different. My face must have been white as a ghost watching him kick and buck and roll over - I was pretty sure that I'd have a vet bill and a broken tree or something. Once he got rid of it he came right back to me. (I am working in a round pen still). I might have been more shook up than him at that point!

Needless to say, when I try it again tomorrow it will be with the old saddle.

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Postby canadian angus » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:58 pm

Was taught this from my Australian friends, lie it down and start over, works like a damn on most horses. Work him all over and then let him up, and trust will be there.

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Faster horses
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Postby Faster horses » Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:10 pm

canadian angus wrote:Was taught this from my Australian friends, lie it down and start over, works like a damn on most horses. Work him all over and then let him up, and trust will be there.

CA


While this is good advice for an experienced hand, I don't think it is
the right thing for a novice to try. Laying them down is one thing,
but how you let them up is as important or even moreso than
laying them down. And if you don't lay them down correctly you
could injure the horses' knees.

Sounds like a lot going on with this young horse to me and now he
is scared. I vote for getting professional help. It doesn't take many
mistakes to make a bad habit. Seems like horses tend to learn the bad
things faster than the good things. That's why there are professionals
to help with horses. If you can't get a live person to help you, then
at least do what JF Ranch suggested. I remember Pat Parelli with good advice:
"green on green=broken bones" and we sure don't want that.
Good luck and be very careful. Your horse is scared now. The next
time you try to saddle him could be worse. And you could get kicked...
"All the Democrats know how to do is lie and “forget.”--Trey Gowdy

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Postby LCP » Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:57 pm

I guess it doesn't seem to me like the trust was necessarily broken. Once both of us realized we were ok, I spent 10-15 min reviewing things he already knew (picking up his feet, putting the saddle blanket on him, etc) and he did fine. He wasn't afraid of the saddle afterwards either - he was checking it out while I was looking it over for damage.

I haven't a clue how to lay a horse down (other than with tranquilizers??) so I won't likely be trying it this time. Thanks for the advice anyway CA.

While I am a novice at breaking horses, I have used them all my life around cattle. I think today I did not bring my A-game to the round pen - not attentive enough to the horse's body language. He was not ready for what I was asking of him. Lesson learned.

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Postby Faster horses » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:19 pm

Please just remember this one thing--horses forgive but they never
forget...

Good luck and I mean that sincerely.
"All the Democrats know how to do is lie and “forget.”--Trey Gowdy

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Postby OldDog/NewTricks » Wed Mar 21, 2012 11:37 am

leanin' H wrote:Well you can't let him win. I would tie him good in a spot he can't hurt himself and saddle him and leave him saddled for half a day. You'll have to watch him but he's gotta learn you run the show. I am a huge fan of sacking a horse out and then using a rope to create pressure points which he has to yeild to. I am sure you have a system that you are following. Remember that going slower makes it go faster. And a horse throws a fit for a reason that makes sense to him while not neccesarily us. :D If he learns bad behavior = pressure (which he dislikes) and good behavior = the pressure ceasing, he will be fine. Good luck, be safe and keep us posted. :D



Tie him High (with a quick release knot) so he can't pull back much...
When I was young I use to SACK them out or just BUCK-m-out but I've learned different (The Hard Way)

You should Not have let him win yesterday - that makes more work today.
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Postby VB RANCH » Wed Mar 21, 2012 12:13 pm

Are you throwin the saddle on then screwing it down tight
if you are, you cant, shouldnt even with a broke horse,
put it on tight enuff to stay, then walk him off a ways,
then snugg it up, when you have it tight, you should still
be able to get your fingures under the chinch by the latigo, EASEY
if you round penned him with a long rope, then do that when you got a saddle on him
just keep on him, when you both screw up
go back to some thing you both can do
then move ahead again
If you ain't never broke a horse befor
you really got your hands full
NOT imposible tho
GOOD LUCK

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Postby VB RANCH » Wed Mar 21, 2012 12:52 pm

PS
them colts only got so much attention span
watch for that, every day he will get
so he can take a little more

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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Wed Mar 21, 2012 4:53 pm

LCP wrote:I guess it doesn't seem to me like the trust was necessarily broken. Once both of us realized we were ok, I spent 10-15 min reviewing things he already knew (picking up his feet, putting the saddle blanket on him, etc) and he did fine. He wasn't afraid of the saddle afterwards either - he was checking it out while I was looking it over for damage.

I haven't a clue how to lay a horse down (other than with tranquilizers??) so I won't likely be trying it this time. Thanks for the advice anyway CA.

While I am a novice at breaking horses, I have used them all my life around cattle. I think today I did not bring my A-game to the round pen - not attentive enough to the horse's body language. He was not ready for what I was asking of him. Lesson learned.



"While I am a novice at breaking horses, I have used them all my life around cattle. I think today I did not bring my A-game to the round pen - not attentive enough to the horse's body language. He was not ready for what I was asking of him. Lesson learned."

If you learned that you probably had a good day.

Just back up a little and work up to where you were and progress as he allows you.
I think your doing just fine. Be careful and don't get either of you hurt.

Everybody has to start with the first one. :D
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