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This week in Christian History

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TexasBred
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Postby TexasBred » Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:26 am

burnt wrote:
TexasBred wrote:
balestabber wrote:in Acts,speaking of Saul and and Barnabas,it mentions 'churches' in plural form for the first time.Acts 9:31 speaks of churches being multiplied.

seems a church on every corner here,sometimes 4 or 5 in a small town.the old churches have some history to them tho.


All the early christian churches were founded by the apostles and their successors and on that authority. Didn't have that "church on every corner" thing like today. Nor the congregation splitting down the middle and two churches forming both built on anger and stubborness.


MOSTLY true! The Great Schism of 1054 represented a bit of a split! :? Mutual excommunication sounds at least a little bit angry!


Mostly?? What is not true?? Excommunication is still done today Burnt...but protestants now call it getting "churched". Basically nothing more excommunication .And yeah the "greeat schism" was a loss for everyone but For whatever it's worth the Eastern and Western churches ARE in communion.
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Postby burnt » Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:30 pm

Well I certainly am not an authority on any one tradition, but am painfully aware of some of the more well known turbulence that mainstream and subsequent expressions of faith have encountered. And I would like to see no one so unfortunate as to have experienced the pain and wounding of excommunication, as many have in the history of the faith, and some for wrong reasons.

However, as far as divisions or unity in the church are concerned, I do believe this - our western society is on a determined path of increased secularism and now-overt hatred of Christianity.

Therefore, I see that instead of the 911 years that it took for the two halves of the Catholic Church to even tentatively bridge their differences, Christians everywhere and of every denomination will practically overnight to be forced to acknowledge what it is that unifies them in true faith - the Lordship of Jesus Christ, the risen Son of God.

If this discussion can move those of us who profess Christian faith even one tiny step closer to recognizing the common bond between us, it should be considered a giant step forward for the church.
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby burnt » Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:41 pm

Interestingly enough, it was on this date that one attempt was made to re-join the Orthodox and Rome churches. "January 8, 1438: In an attempt to forge an alliance that would save Constantinople from the Turks, the Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches meet at the Council of Ferrara-Florence. A temporary union was reached, but Constantinople fell anyway in 1453, ending the Byzantine Empire."

Also, it was on this date that in "1956: Missionaries Jim Elliot, Nate Saint, Roger Youderian, Ed McCully, and Pete Fleming are killed by Ecuadorean Indians they sought to evangelize. The story of the missionaries and their deaths along the Curaray River was publicized by Elliot's widow, Elizabeth, in Through Gates of Splendor, published the following year."

Those guys obviously believed in something more important than just working for a perishing loaf of bread . . .
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby burnt » Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:04 am

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thi ... anhistory/

This week's review begins grimly with murder and martyrdom. It also relates how George Whitfield's open-air ministry began when jealous preachers wouldn't let him use their pulpits . . .

And modern day T.V. preachers gone bad, as alluded to in last week's posts, have nothing on this early bit of scandalous history -

"January 11, 1875: The "Scandal of the Century" goes public . . ."

A sad recollection from the past - "January 15, 1697: Massachusetts citizens observe a day of fasting and repentance for the Salem witch trials of 1692, in which 19 suspected witches were hanged and more than 150 imprisoned. The day was declared "That so all of God's people may offer up fervent supplications unto him, that all iniquity may be put away, which hath stirred God's holy jealousy against this land; that he would show us what we know not, and help us, wherein we have done amiss, to do so no more" (see issue 41: American Puritans)." What a powerful prayer!
For further reading-
http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/project ... /salem.htm
What a horrid story. I wonder if history will look back and see us as participating in "witch hunts" in our time? Are prayer and fasting a thing of the past?

"January 13, 1501: Christianity's first vernacular hymnal . . ." printed, although we would not have been able to sing from it without translation!

Philip Jacob Spener, is born . . . emphasis on new birth and holy living; George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends (Quakers), dies . . .

Here's an important one - Hilary of Poitiers, a man whose anti-Arianism writing and work helped preserve purer doctrine about the nature of Christ. Jesus was fully man, fully God!

Much, much more to read in this week's look back. All these people and actions have left their distinctive mark on the development of the faith that each of us holds (or not) today.
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby TexasBred » Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:25 am

burnt wrote:Well I certainly am not an authority on any one tradition, but am painfully aware of some of the more well known turbulence that mainstream and subsequent expressions of faith have encountered. And I would like to see no one so unfortunate as to have experienced the pain and wounding of excommunication, as many have in the history of the faith, and some for wrong reasons.

However, as far as divisions or unity in the church are concerned, I do believe this - our western society is on a determined path of increased secularism and now-overt hatred of Christianity.

Therefore, I see that instead of the 911 years that it took for the two halves of the Catholic Church to even tentatively bridge their differences, Christians everywhere and of every denomination will practically overnight to be forced to acknowledge what it is that unifies them in true faith - the Lordship of Jesus Christ, the risen Son of God.

If this discussion can move those of us who profess Christian faith even one tiny step closer to recognizing the common bond between us, it should be considered a giant step forward for the church.


Amen Brother.
Nothing but a beggar trying to show other beggars where I found bread.

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Postby balestabber » Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:24 pm

wow,the deeper this gets,the more interesting i find it.
i reck'n murder and martyrdom happened then and still happens today.
whether it be the story of cain and abel,jealous preachers,witch hunters,saint valentine or the pope himself---i have to remind myself of
Saint John chapter1-verse 1

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Postby TexasBred » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:30 pm

balestabber wrote:wow,the deeper this gets,the more interesting i find it.
i reck'n murder and martyrdom happened then and still happens today.
whether it be the story of cain and abel,jealous preachers,witch hunters,saint valentine or the pope himself---i have to remind myself of
Saint John chapter1-verse 1


There's no denying that many people have been killed over the ages in the name of "defending the faith" or "keeping the faith pure". My Church as guilty as the next. Even during the middle of the reformation reformers were killing members of another reformers group. And today we spend more time and enery "stealing sheep" than seeking the lost sheep.
Nothing but a beggar trying to show other beggars where I found bread.

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balestabber
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Postby balestabber » Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:32 am

bad shepherd,,bad shepherd

when the shepherd is stricken,the sheep will stray

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Postby TexasBred » Tue Jan 11, 2011 1:52 pm

balestabber wrote:bad shepherd,,bad shepherd

when the shepherd is stricken,the sheep will stray


Those with a shepherd do not stray, yet another shepherd comes and takes them. Offering "greener pastures".
Nothing but a beggar trying to show other beggars where I found bread.

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Postby balestabber » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:32 pm

i am enjoying this thread,but ya got me stumped.

i'll get back to my study.thanks for the replys.

balestabber---

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Postby burnt » Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:35 am

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thi ... anhistory/

A few weeks ago we recalled that it was in the mid to late 1300's that John Wycliffe was instrumental in the translation of the Bible into English. In today's look back at history, we see that ~160 years later, the British Parliament put restrictions on who could read that English language Bible - had we lived back then, most of us would not have been allowed the "right" . . .

Then in 1604 a Puritan calls for this - " . . . that there might bee a newe translation of the Bible, as consonant as can be to the original Hebrew and Greek." . . .

January 17, 356 (traditional date): Antony of Egypt, regarded as the founder of Christian monasticism, dies at age 105 . . . the monastic movement began in response to the utter secularization of Christianity when it became the state religion. Where does the state of the western Church today fit in the continuum between the two extremes?

1377 - divisive troubles for the Church of Rome/Avignon

1525 - debate over "infant or adult" baptism, Zwingli vs. Conrad Grebel and Felix Manz, two Anabaptist forerunners who are eventually killed for their views, for more on this read here -
http://www.enjoyinggodministries.com/ar ... abaptists/

Hey BMr, one just for you - "January 19, 1086: Canute the Great, the king of Denmark, is killed by his subjects. . ." (tell us about the KC brand?)

Many more markers along the road to read of in this week's look in the rear-view mirror, some bright, some very dark.
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Sun Jan 16, 2011 9:55 am

The KC brand came with the place my Grandpa bought from a man by the name of Jack Canute. Canute was the neighbor everybody fought with. He used to leave the gates open going down to the Big muddy post for the mail and the rancher there would lay up in the rocks with a rifle waiting for him. HE plowed a fire guard behind his house, but not on his own property. In fact I had some cows to coax down to a gate just yesterday and I couldn't get up the hill to them because those fire guard furrows have eroded so bad in the last 60 years they are 4 feet deep in places. My Dad had bought another part of a ranch and some hay came with it. Before they could get up there with a couple of teams to fork the hay on the racks and haul it home Canute had turned his cows into the stacks. Dad said he was so mad he swung his pitch fork and let it go and it stuck in the side of a cow. Then he was worried how he was going to get it out. The stories go on and on about a miserable old neighbor that's been gone close 60 years.
I was always told the KC stood for King Canute but until you started posting "This week in Christian History" I thought Canute was a Scottish King. Guess I didn't know my history very well.
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