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This week in Christian History

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burnt
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Postby burnt » Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:51 am

Wow, that's pretty interesting and Canute sounds like he came from a long line of friendly Vikings. :wink:
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby burnt » Sun Jan 23, 2011 8:04 am

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thi ... anhistory/

Jan. 25, 98 - A new Emperor, Trajan, is installed in Rome - he instituted "the Alimenta", a form of social assistance for the poorest of Italy. Trajan would have been a contemporary of some of the apostles and early church leaders. He ordered a Roman Senator, Pliny the Younger, to 'investigate a new superstition, "Christianity."'

Part of Pliny's finding - "...For whatever the nature of their creed might be, I could at least feel no doubt that contumacy and inflexible obstinacy deserved chastisement..." Wow, stand up for what you believe and you suffer the consequences! Many of these early believers suffered a degree persecution for their faith, sometimes death, yet overall Trajan earned a reputation as a "just" ruler. What commitment do you and I show to our faith in Christ?

More here - http://www.allaboutthejourney.org/pliny-the-younger.htm

"January 28, 814: Charlemagne, the first Holy Roman Emperor, dies. He was, in his day, not only one of the greatest political rulers of all time, he was, in his day, more influential in church matters than the pope. He saw his task as secular ruler "to defend with our arms the holy Church of Christ against attacks by the heathen from any side and against devastation by the infidels." It is interesting to contemplate how Jesus Christ would have viewed the efforts of Charlemagne . . .

[/i]
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby TexasBred » Tue Jan 25, 2011 3:22 pm

burnt wrote:"January 28, 814: Charlemagne, the first Holy Roman Emperor, dies. He was, in his day, not only one of the greatest political rulers of all time, he was, in his day, more influential in church matters than the pope. He saw his task as secular ruler "to defend with our arms the holy Church of Christ against attacks by the heathen from any side and against devastation by the infidels." It is interesting to contemplate how Jesus Christ would have viewed the efforts of Charlemagne . . .
[/i]

Like many Charlemagne saw himself as "defender of the faith". The infidels most likely refers to the Muslim advance at that time. But Charlemagne also saw himself as the one who could conquer and "expand" Christianity into the conqured lands...What he did was not totally unlike what the "Christian" settlers in the new world did to the native Americans.
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Postby burnt » Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:38 am

The history page will not come up today. So, I am forced to live in the present for now . . . . .

:?
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Sun Jan 30, 2011 9:39 am

burnt wrote:The history page will not come up today. So, I am forced to live in the present for now . . . . .

:?


Maybe on this day in History nothing happened. :lol: :lol: :lol:

It has been a long January. :D
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Postby Martin Jr. » Sun Jan 30, 2011 1:33 pm

www.davidmacd.com/catholic/timeline_of_ ... church.htm

Here is a timeline of the church for the first 500 years. There is a timeline of the bible at the end.

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Postby burnt » Mon Jan 31, 2011 9:54 am

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thi ... anhistory/

Finally it's up and working!

"January 31, 1561: Anabaptist leader Menno Simons, for whom Mennonites are named, dies in Wustenfeld, Germany". . . this was 25 years after he left the Roman Catholic church and became the "founder" of the Mennonites, the tradition which is my formative background.

This week remembers the death of Gutenburg and the birth of the composer Mendelssohn . . .

The great evangelist D.L. Moody is born in 1837 and his preaching and writing was heard and read by an estimated 100,000,000 people, being referenced yet today!

"February 5, 1864: Having already established herself as a poet, 44-year-old Fanny Crosby pens her first hymn. She went on to write 8,000 more before her death 50 years later." Did you know that Fanny Crosby was blind?
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby TexasBred » Mon Jan 31, 2011 10:57 am

burnt wrote:http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thisweekinchristianhistory/

Finally it's up and working!

"January 31, 1561: Anabaptist leader Menno Simons, for whom Mennonites are named, dies in Wustenfeld, Germany". . . this was 25 years after he left the Roman Catholic church and became the "founder" of the Mennonites, the tradition which is my formative background.This week remembers the death of Gutenburg and the birth of the composer Mendelssohn . . .

The great evangelist D.L. Moody is born in 1837 and his preaching and writing was heard and read by an estimated 100,000,000 people, being referenced yet today!

"February 5, 1864: Having already established herself as a poet, 44-year-old Fanny Crosby pens her first hymn. She went on to write 8,000 more before her death 50 years later." Did you know that Fanny Crosby was blind?


burnt...are you still a practicing Mennonite? We have a pretty good size Mennonite community down here in central Texas. The ones I've met are very nice folks. But they multiply almost as fast as we Catholics :lol2:
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Postby TexasBred » Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:02 am

Martin Jr. wrote:www.davidmacd.com/catholic/timeline_of_catholic_church.htm

Here is a timeline of the church for the first 500 years. There is a timeline of the bible at the end.


Good link Martin, thanks. For those that sometimes accuse US of adding books to the bible hopefully they will more fully understand that books were actually removed from the bible. Center column references to the deutrocanonical books can be found even in the KJV right up thru the early 20th century.
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Postby burnt » Mon Jan 31, 2011 1:51 pm

TexasBred wrote:
burnt wrote:http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/thisweekinchristianhistory/

Finally it's up and working!

"January 31, 1561: Anabaptist leader Menno Simons, for whom Mennonites are named, dies in Wustenfeld, Germany". . . this was 25 years after he left the Roman Catholic church and became the "founder" of the Mennonites, the tradition which is my formative background.This week remembers the death of Gutenburg and the birth of the composer Mendelssohn . . .

The great evangelist D.L. Moody is born in 1837 and his preaching and writing was heard and read by an estimated 100,000,000 people, being referenced yet today!

"February 5, 1864: Having already established herself as a poet, 44-year-old Fanny Crosby pens her first hymn. She went on to write 8,000 more before her death 50 years later." Did you know that Fanny Crosby was blind?


burnt...are you still a practicing Mennonite? We have a pretty good size Mennonite community down here in central Texas. The ones I've met are very nice folks. But they multiply almost as fast as we Catholics :lol2:


"Still a practicing Mennonite?" Well the setting in which I grew up wouldn't say so! :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: Although there are still a lot of "practicing Mennonites' today, I would be inclined to emphasize the "practicing" part, because, for the most part, they seem to have lost sight of what Menno Simons was actually about! :lol2: And if some of them were to read this, they would again probably think they were justified in not serving me communion! O.K., enough with the bashing, boy!

But TexasBred, your question raises a point which touches the heart of one reason why I felt compelled to start doing this Christian history segment.

Because your question brings to memory an unforgettable story told by a (very conservative Mennonite!) preacher that I heard over 30? years ago.

He was speaking to a large gathering which had come to hear of his travels in the Soviet Union at a time when the communist state was inflicting significant persecution on believers and possession of Bibles was forbidden. He purpose for traveling there was to take Bibles in to distribute to unregistered gatherings of Christians, an "illegal" activity itself.

He told of meeting with the leading figure of one such gathering whose outward appearance suggested that he might hold Mennonite beliefs. He asked the man "Bist du Mennonitten?", German for "Are you Mennonite?"

A period of silence followed his quiet question. Thinking the man had not heard him, he repeated the question a little louder, "Bist du Mennonitten?"

Again, there was a prolonged, uncomfortable silence. Eventually, the other man slowly turned to him and asked, still in German, "Are you a believer?" The look of pain on the face of the pastor from the underground church was like a dagger going through the heart of the Western traveler. I wonder if our proudly held "divisions" might not do the same to the heart of Christ.

I am currently reading a book entitled "The Body Broken", by Robert Benson. It is a heart-rending story about Benson's experience of the "Church" in its varied traditions and expressions thereof, and how those varied expressions divide believers. (I highly recommend reading it)

The way he describes some of his perceptions of how we ALL have fragmented the body of Christ literally brought me to tears at times. To think that Christ prayed to the Father that his followers would " . . . be one, even as as you and I are one . . ." , well, doesn't that kinda show how important it is to recognize and strive to reinforce our common bond in his family, if we claim God as our Father and Christ as Savior?

That we are missing something that should bring us together, rather than divide us? The grim irony of making the Eucharist or Communion service an "exclusive" event? Will there be separate "congregations" in the Afterlife?

But in our human obstinacy and need to be "right", we have splintered the body of Christ into thousands of denominational traditions and given the enemies of faith a legitimate reason to say that we are irrelevant (not to mention some of the horror stories of evil happenings that seem to trouble any tradition).

So, perhaps the more challenging question would be "Am I a practicing disciple". Cuz when I stand before God someday, I don't think he will be asking me if I followed the rules of one so-called "church" or another, or if I was a " . . . nice folk . . .".

It's gonna hit a little deeper than that.

(And to think that all you did to trigger this "book" is ask if I'm a practicing Mennonite . . . :lol2: :cowboy: )
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby TexasBred » Mon Jan 31, 2011 4:07 pm

But can we truly assemble as "one" in Christ and receive the Holy Eucharist unless we all profess the same beliefs?

God will only be concerned wtih "What did we do with Jesus". Yet in our separation we disregard his sacrifice for "All".
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Postby balestabber » Sat Feb 05, 2011 6:00 am

my great-grandfather was a preacher.was always told he had and read a Gutenburg Bible.i have only seen one.
very interesting,thanks again


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