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Some outdoor pig fences.

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andybob
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Some outdoor pig fences.

Postby andybob » Sun Mar 20, 2011 4:07 pm

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middlewhite sows behind two strand electric wire.
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Weaner piglets behind sheep netting with single electric training wire.
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close up of training wire.
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Close up of adjustable insulators.
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Store pigs behind two strand fence.
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Sow and litter behind three strand fence.
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Another view of the sow and litter.
Last edited by andybob on Sat Mar 26, 2011 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Big Muddy rancher
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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:29 pm

Do they stay on that same ground or are they rotated with cattle or sheep?
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balestabber
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Postby balestabber » Sun Mar 20, 2011 8:06 pm

that electric fence will bring the squeal out in a pig.i had a heating element under a pig waterer during a cold winter.the mice had chewed the wires untill they shorted.like to never got those sows to drink from that waterer again.

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Postby Kato » Sun Mar 20, 2011 8:35 pm

Those are sure happy looking pigs. A pig with mud on it's snout is a happy pig. :wink:

Speaking of waterers, when we had outdoor pigs, we had a one that let the water out when they pushed a lever with their noses. Our pigs learned how to put rocks in it so it would overflow and make a nice big wallow. And they had mud on more than their snouts!
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Postby burnt » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:59 am

Back when my dad ran this place, keeping some dry sows outdoors
in the summer was a great way to gain space
and cut way back on the labor. Electric fencing was a
quick and highly effective way of containing them.

The downside of electric fence became obvious when it came time
to move them back indoors or to another area - they would not cross
the place where the wire had been for anything. Usually ended up
taking another wire behind them and touching it to their hindquarters
and then they would scoot over . . . :shock:
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Postby andybob » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:21 pm

Big Muddy, the native pastures are used only for the cattle and sheep, the planted leys are grazed for 4 years by cattle and sheep and chickens, then a year under pigs before being cropped unde the traditional rotation.
Balestabber, we check the voltage daily to keep it at about 8000 volts, if a fence shorts on the troughs, it is essential to find it and repair it ASAP, then ensure the pigs are still drinking.

Kato, they constantly drop stone or wash mud off in their water, we clean all the troughs on a rotation to keep them clean and functioning. In summer we put in a microjet to make a mud wallow away from their trough, so that they can cool off in the wallow, and cover in mud to protect from sunburn
Burnt, the finisher pigs are in a waggon wheel layout, with ten paddocks each with a gate which make up the 'hub' of the wheel, the pigs readily come into the central radial (corral) for food we weigh and load them from there, the adults are trailer trained, and will get on a trailer parked in the paddock with food.
The manure grows a great crop of corn silage or wheat after the pigs are moved on.

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Postby Clarencen » Mon Mar 21, 2011 9:45 pm

When we had pigs here, we used an electric fence some times. I don't suppose our fencers were s hot as some today and we only used one wire, but a few pigs would decide they were going to cross the fence regardless. They would make a run for it then start aquealing six feet before they ever touched the wire.


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