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2 Year old Filly

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HAY MAKER
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Postby HAY MAKER » Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:03 pm

LazyWP wrote:I would say its awful DAMN hard to break a horse 1000 miles away from the horse!! I ride whatever the horse works best in. Sometimes a snaffle, bosal, grazing bit, halter, or maybe a string around the jaw. As Haymaker says, its all in the hands! Mine are to heavy, most of the time, so I tend to use as mild of bit as I can get away with.

Haymaker, use your own judgement.


Thanks, and i would say your advice is dead on, I pay little attention to these arm chair experts anyway :D
good luck

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Big Muddy rancher
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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Wed Oct 24, 2012 10:10 pm

HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:
HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:A snaffle bit is the most common type of bit used while riding horses. It consists of a bit mouthpiece with a ring on either side and acts with direct pressure. A bridle utilizing only a snaffle bit is often called a "snaffle bridle," particularly in the English riding disciplines. A bridle that carries two bits, a curb bit and a snaffle, or "bradoon," is called a double bridle.

A snaffle is not necessarily a bit with a jointed bit mouthpiece, as is often thought. A bit is a snaffle because it creates direct pressure without leverage on the mouth. It is a bit without a shank. Therefore, a single- or double-jointed mouthpiece, though the most common designs for snaffle bits, does not make a bit a snaffle. Even a mullen mouth (a solid, slightly curved bar) or a bar bit is a snaffle.


One mans opinion of what a snaffle is does and likely never been on a green horse in heavy brush.
I use broke large ring snaffle when I have a high strung green horse, they don't feel as trapped, if they are worth my time I graduated them to the bit I feel best suits the the job expected .
I probably have 30 or more bits in my tack room everything from a tractor supply special to some hi end hand mades, but its always the hands that use the bit, but it sure don't hurt to have the right bit in the right hands.
Good luck



"acts with direct pressure."

"without leverage on the mouth."

I don't think you get it. :roll:


And i dont think you have ever got it, this filly is coming along fine with a straight port, no canuckle haid advice needed, especially from someone that caint bridle a green colt. :roll:
good luck


So this filly is already broke to ride and neck rein, What;s the little girl need you for?
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I can't tame wild women.

But I can make tame women wild.

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Postby HAY MAKER » Thu Oct 25, 2012 6:50 am

Big Muddy rancher wrote:
HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:
HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:A snaffle bit is the most common type of bit used while riding horses. It consists of a bit mouthpiece with a ring on either side and acts with direct pressure. A bridle utilizing only a snaffle bit is often called a "snaffle bridle," particularly in the English riding disciplines. A bridle that carries two bits, a curb bit and a snaffle, or "bradoon," is called a double bridle.

A snaffle is not necessarily a bit with a jointed bit mouthpiece, as is often thought. A bit is a snaffle because it creates direct pressure without leverage on the mouth. It is a bit without a shank. Therefore, a single- or double-jointed mouthpiece, though the most common designs for snaffle bits, does not make a bit a snaffle. Even a mullen mouth (a solid, slightly curved bar) or a bar bit is a snaffle.


One mans opinion of what a snaffle is does and likely never been on a green horse in heavy brush.
I use broke large ring snaffle when I have a high strung green horse, they don't feel as trapped, if they are worth my time I graduated them to the bit I feel best suits the the job expected .
I probably have 30 or more bits in my tack room everything from a tractor supply special to some hi end hand mades, but its always the hands that use the bit, but it sure don't hurt to have the right bit in the right hands.
Good luck



"acts with direct pressure."

"without leverage on the mouth."

I don't think you get it. :roll:


And i dont think you have ever got it, this filly is coming along fine with a straight port, no canuckle haid advice needed, especially from someone that caint bridle a green colt. :roll:
good luck


So this filly is already broke to ride and neck rein, What;s the little girl need you for?


You wanna talk horse or women, if I was you I stick to hoss talk cause first thing I'm gonna ask you is what would Miss Tam need a big dumb canuckle haid like you for ? You ain't got any sense and your too old to treat a woman romantically, remind me of an old bull Elmo had old thang had one horn and one nut was too old to fight or ***** he just layed there and bellered and crapped all day.
Good luck

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Postby Big Muddy rancher » Thu Oct 25, 2012 7:10 am

HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:
HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:
HAY MAKER wrote:
Big Muddy rancher wrote:A snaffle bit is the most common type of bit used while riding horses. It consists of a bit mouthpiece with a ring on either side and acts with direct pressure. A bridle utilizing only a snaffle bit is often called a "snaffle bridle," particularly in the English riding disciplines. A bridle that carries two bits, a curb bit and a snaffle, or "bradoon," is called a double bridle.

A snaffle is not necessarily a bit with a jointed bit mouthpiece, as is often thought. A bit is a snaffle because it creates direct pressure without leverage on the mouth. It is a bit without a shank. Therefore, a single- or double-jointed mouthpiece, though the most common designs for snaffle bits, does not make a bit a snaffle. Even a mullen mouth (a solid, slightly curved bar) or a bar bit is a snaffle.


One mans opinion of what a snaffle is does and likely never been on a green horse in heavy brush.
I use broke large ring snaffle when I have a high strung green horse, they don't feel as trapped, if they are worth my time I graduated them to the bit I feel best suits the the job expected .
I probably have 30 or more bits in my tack room everything from a tractor supply special to some hi end hand mades, but its always the hands that use the bit, but it sure don't hurt to have the right bit in the right hands.
Good luck



"acts with direct pressure."

"without leverage on the mouth."

I don't think you get it. :roll:


And i dont think you have ever got it, this filly is coming along fine with a straight port, no canuckle haid advice needed, especially from someone that caint bridle a green colt. :roll:
good luck


So this filly is already broke to ride and neck rein, What;s the little girl need you for?


You wanna talk horse or women, if I was you I stick to hoss talk cause first thing I'm gonna ask you is what would Miss Tam need a big dumb canuckle haid like you for ? You ain't got any sense and your too old to treat a woman romantically, remind me of an old bull Elmo had old thang had one horn and one nut was too old to fight or ***** he just layed there and bellered and crapped all day.
Good luck


It's so easy to tell when you realize your wrong. :nod: :nod: :lol2: :lol2: :cowboy:
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I can't tame wild women.



But I can make tame women wild.

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Postby katrina » Thu Oct 25, 2012 7:53 am

Faster horses wrote:Actually, haymaker, what you have on that filly is a trap.

A snaffle will not hurt the bars of a horses mouth (as there is no down pressure) and with a snaffle you can teach a horse how to bend. With a
shank bit, horses get stiff. Even older horses it isn't a bad thing to ride them once in awhile with a snaffle bit to keep them flexible and not stiff. Actually Mr. FH prefers to ride
everything but a real tried-and-true older horse with a snaffle bit. He can
get more done a lot easier. He uses harness leather split reins that are
7' long with a tie so that if a horse breaks a rein it can be easily repaired
without taking it anywhere to be fixed.

I do want to caution you, if the bit you have modified has a straight bar
mouthpiece, those can cut a horses tongue and that's awful. Bits should have a port for tongue release.

Usually with young horses they need a bigger mouthpiece, by that I mean bigger around; even on a snaffle bit. There is so much to this, like teaching a horse to learn to pack a bit...

I also really frown on using roping reins on a young horse. And there is
a reason for that.

Also, if you watch the good barrel racers, hardly any of them use a tie-down anymore. And very seldom will they use a shank bit, because when you neck-rein a horse, the outside rein is shorter and causes their head to tip to going around the barrel with their head tipped the
wrong way.

If you are trying to use direct rein with a shank bit, you have down pressure added to it and those young horses can get really confused.
If you want to know more, I'll share.

Otherwise, here's wishing you good luck with her. She looks like a sweetie.



:agree:


Not to stir the pot or anything.... :D
Don't sweat the small stuff.

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Postby Yanuck » Thu Oct 25, 2012 8:16 am

LazyWP wrote:I would say its awful DAMN hard to break a horse 1000 miles away from the horse!! I ride whatever the horse works best in. Sometimes a snaffle, bosal, grazing bit, halter, or maybe a string around the jaw. As Haymaker says, its all in the hands! Mine are to heavy, most of the time, so I tend to use as mild of bit as I can get away with.

Haymaker, use your own judgement.




:agree:
Common sense is like deodarant. The people who need it most never use it.

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Postby gcreekrch » Thu Oct 25, 2012 9:16 am

Yanuck wrote:
LazyWP wrote:I would say its awful DAMN hard to break a horse 1000 miles away from the horse!! I ride whatever the horse works best in. Sometimes a snaffle, bosal, grazing bit, halter, or maybe a string around the jaw. As Haymaker says, its all in the hands! Mine are to heavy, most of the time, so I tend to use as mild of bit as I can get away with.

Haymaker, use your own judgement.




:agree:


x2
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Postby HAY MAKER » Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:53 am

I think what some folks may do is spend more time than necessary just because this is the way its always been done and they dont think, you caint start every colt the same some are high strung some are laid back, and everything in between,no the differnce and how to adapt, other wise what happens to someone like big dummy horse winds up training him and he dont have sense enough to realize it :D
Remember you are the trainer you are the boss,never ever mistreat a horse but always out think him and first and foremost is get the horse to know that you are the boss and you make the calls everytime.
It is the fastest easiest way to the desired result.
good luck

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Postby HAY MAKER » Thu Oct 25, 2012 12:08 pm

I just got in from workin the filly she is coming along, she will bow her head for halter flexs right and left stand still for saddle and bridles well, next week Ill ride her and teach her how to rein the rest will be wet blankets, I dont think Im gonna have enough time to mess with her feet.
Not bad for 2 weeks work for a filly thats never been worked, I hafta admitt tho she is a special horse Damned laid back. The only draw back to a fast pace is having one blow up and I dont think this filly will, as a matter of fact im gonna try and get her to week after next, when she leaves here she will be far from finished but started thats all I agreed to.
End of story.
good luck

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Postby MsSage » Thu Oct 25, 2012 1:41 pm

I really love it when yall start talking bits and such. I learn so much from the different ways of doing things and point ofviews.
Thanks all of yall
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Postby floyd » Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:39 am

30 bits, & no jaquimas?

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Postby HAY MAKER » Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:46 am

floyd wrote:30 bits, & no jaquimas?


we dont call them that arouind here, i think the girl that brought her down here was tryin to work herwith a bosal cause she couldnt bridle her.
good luck


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