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This week in Christian History

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jun 07, 2015 1:50 pm

June 7, 1811: "James Young Simpson was born at Bathgate, Scotland. He graduated from the University of Scotland as an MD, discovered the use of chloroform as an anesthetic and made great improvements in gynecological procedures. Asked before a group of scientists what was his greatest discovery, he replied, "That I was a sinner and Jesus died for me." He was active in the Scottish Free Church. (Christianity.com)

June 8, 1794: “French revolutionaries replace Christianity with a deistic religion honoring a trinity of "Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity." They renamed churches "Temples of Reason," and a new calendar announced a 10-Day week and holiday s commemorating events of the revolution. The "reign of terror" followed, with some 1,400 people losing their heads. Napolean recognized the church again in 1804, then proceeded to imprison Pope Pius VII.” (ChristianityToday)

There arises a problem with a society that discards the Bible as an absolute basis for determining standards - who sets the standard, and based on what? When there is no absolute, every decision-making process devolves into a contest of the likes and wishes of one against those of another.

June 8th, 1978: Solzhenitsyn's Harvard address was given on this day, and this is another quote from it:“(Solzhenitsyn) went on to analyze how legalism has eaten up morality. "The West has finally achieved the rights of man, and even to excess, but man's sense of responsibility to God and society has grown dimmer and dimmer. Must one point out that from ancient times a decline in courage has been considered the first symptom of the end?"” (C.c)

http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30842.html
June 9, 68: “Nero Claudius Caesar, the ruler to whom the Apostle Paul appealed for justice (Acts 25:10) and who ordered the first imperial persecution of Christians, commits suicide.” (CT)

June 10, 1900: “Chinese soldiers and Boxers surround the home of the Orthodox priest Fr. Mitrophan about ten at night, having burned his church a week and a half earlier. They torture Mitrophan and the Christians assembled at his house, primarily women and children. Finally Boxers puncture his chest and he dies under a date tree.” (Christian History Institute)

Unspeakable atrocities were done to European “colonizers” and others during the Boxer rebellion. However, such horrible things committed by the Boxers (rape, torture, murder and looting) were equally matched by the European armies who moved in to meet the violence. “A foreign journalist, George Lynch, said "there are things that I must not write, and that may not be printed in England, which would seem to show that this Western civilization of ours is merely a veneer over savagery."” (Wikipedia)
June 11, 1294: “Death of Roger Bacon, a Franciscan monk and one of the most original thinkers of the Middle Ages. He had predicted aircraft, submarines, suspension bridges, engines, and more.” (CHI)

June 12, 1898: “Death of Sanford F. Bennett, American hymnwriter, author of the hymn “In the Sweet By and By” (“There’s a Land That Is Fairer Than Day”).”(CHI)

"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jun 14, 2015 12:15 pm

June 14,1936: "Death of G. K. Chesterton, an influential Roman Catholic apologist and wit, noted for his use of paradox. Pope Pius XI will pronounce him a defender of the faith." (christianhistoryinstitute.org)

Who is this guy? Chesterton was a modern wit, pundit Christian apologist and prodigious writer whose books led many to faith, including C.S. Lewis, as well as instigating others to start social movements, such as Gandhi...read more here -

http://www.chesterton.org/who-is-this-guy/ http://www.chesterton.org/quotations-of-g-k-chesterton/

June 15, 313: "Edict of Milan is proclaimed by Licinius when he enters Nicomedia." (CHI.org) This was the proclamation of freedom of religion for Christians who had up until the time of Constantine suffered horribly at the hands of the Roman government. It was after this that Christianty became a favored religion and, what was once a faith kept pure by the fires of persecution, became an increasingly corrupted political mechanism by which position, power and wealth were acquired...so the question lingers: did this edict help or hinder the true faith?

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/199 ... /2809.html

June 15, 1215: "King John signs the Magna Carta, which begins, "The Church of England shall be free." (ChristianityToday)

The modern day importance of this document cannot be over stated since it forms the bedrock of our present day system of law and order. Yet, we usually sit by idly either in abject ignorance of its significance, or in helpless hand-wringing as we watch bureaucrats and legislators hack away at our Biblically-based civil liberties.

What can be done to protect the quality of life which the Magna Carta enshrined in writing? Be aware of what is happening in government both locally and nationally and make your views known, clearly and without apology, and be an advocate in word and deed for what is right and essential.

http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 29819.html

ON THE TROUBLES we may face in this world:

June 16, 1804: "Anglican missionary to Persia, Henry Martyn wrote in his journal: 'My soul, alas, needs these uneasinesses in outward things, to be driven to take refuge in God.' " (StudyLight.org)

However, not quite 50 years after the proclamation of the Edict of Milan, there arose an emperor who was less favorable toward the Christian faith:

June 17, 362: "Emperor Julian “the Apostate” orders that all professors and schoolmasters must obtain a license before teaching—thus excluding Christians from educating youth." (CHI.org)

Persecution of the followers of Christ has always been a real risk, even today some give their life for the faith:

June 17, 2004: "Jiang Zongxiu, a 34 year old mother and wife in China is arrested and beaten for distributing Christian literature in a marketplace. She will die the next day." (CHI.org)

Such troubles, although mostly unknown to people of faith in our Western society, should come as no surprise since Jesus said this:

"I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33, ESV), and also this: in Matthew 5:11, 12: "Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you." (KJV)

June 18, 1955: "Divine services, Bible studies, and celebration of communion in East Germany are forbidden by the Communist government." (CHI.org)

June 19, 1910: "The first widely-promoted Father's Day celebration of modern America was held in Spokane, Washington on this day..." (Christianty.com) http://www.christianity.com/bible/bible ... 30692.html

June 20, 1776: "Anglican clergyman and hymnwriter John Newton wrote in a letter: 'A Christian is not of hasty growth...but rather like the oak, the progress of which is hardly perceptible, but in time becomes a deep-rooted tree.' " (SLO)

"And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper." (Psalms 1:3, KJV)

"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby TexasBred » Mon Jun 15, 2015 3:40 pm

June 15, 313: "Edict of Milan is proclaimed by Licinius when he enters Nicomedia." (CHI.org) This was the proclamation of freedom of religion for Christians who had up until the time of Constantine suffered horribly at the hands of the Roman government. It was after this that Christianty became a favored religion and, what was once a faith kept pure by the fires of persecution, became an increasingly corrupted political mechanism by which position, power and wealth were acquired...so the question lingers: did this edict help or hinder the true faith?


I find this statement somewhat odd in that the Catholic Church in it's efforts over the centuries tried also to maintain and keep the faith pure by the fires of persecution if necessary but in doing so is considered by protestants to have gone into apostasy and is blamed for the "dark ages".

The Roman Empire was terminally ill by the end of the second century A.D. It had used its skills in administration, engineering, and military strategy to dominate a region spanning three continents. But its heart was weakened by the rise of an absolutist monarchy led, all too frequently, by weak, ineffectual emperors. Slowly, the Roman armies abandoned the most distant outposts and could not prevent the Vandals, Goths, and Huns from penetrating the innermost parts of the Empire. The Goths sacked major Greek cities in 268, gave the same treatment to Rome in 410, and in 476 deposed the last Western Roman Emperor. Deprived of Roman law and economy, much of the region plunged into disorder and poverty.

Lost from the scene was a significant portion of classical Greek science, including Ptolemy’s astronomy, Euclid’s mathematics, Galen’s anatomy, and Aristotle’s naturalistic writings. But it hardly could be said that nothing was going on in these “Dark Ages,” as some are inclined to characterize the next few hundred years. In particular, the establishment of monasteries in the sixth century provided a means for religious training. Literacy improved because instruction depended on readings from the Bible, commentaries, and works of the church Fathers.

Monasteries also provided access to the relatively scant classical works available in Latin. Through the writings of Augustine (354-430), scholars were especially familiar with Plato’s Timaeus. This work lent itself to Christian interpretation because it argued that the Universe had a first cause—an eternal self-mover—that created motion and order. Further, because Plato’s god was good, he created a world that was good for us, the creature. Unlike the Christian God, this self-mover was not a personal god; he did not love man, he was not omnipotent, and he was not the object of worship. However, Plato’s arguments for a Creator-God, combined with biblically based expectations of seeing God’s handiwork in creation (e.g., Psalm 19:1, Romans 1:20), encouraged medieval theologians to affirm the fundamental intelligibility of God’s creation. Although Augustine frowned upon the systematic study of nature, the concept of nature’s basic orderliness provided an important key to the development of modern science (Jones, 1969, p. 133).

During this same period, Arabic-Islamic science had reached tremendous heights. It led the world in mathematics, physics, optics, astronomy, and medicine. The stability and wealth brought by the spread of Islamic power in the seventh and eighth centuries fostered patronage of higher learning. In 762, al-Mansur established Baghdad as his new capital, and “cultivated a religious climate that was relatively intellectual, secularized, and tolerant” (Lindberg, 1992, p. 168). Over the next few generations, Arab scholars enhanced their own knowledge with medicine from Persia, mathematics from India and China, and the classical Greek heritage preserved in Byzantium. Much emphasis was given to knowledge that had special utility for Islamic culture. For example, the Chinese abacus, and the Hindu system of numbers and place-valued decimal notation, were used to advance trigonometry and Ptolemy’s astronomy. These, in turn, could be used to determine the direction to Mecca and the times of prayer for any town in the Muslim world.

Crucial to the development of Arabic science was a massive translation program begun by Hunayn ibn Ishaq (808-73), a member of the Nestorian Christian sect. Arabs filled their numerous libraries with tens- or hundreds-of-thousands of books, whereas the Sorbonne in Paris could boast of a paltry two thousand as late as the fourteenth century (Huff, 1993, p. 74). Despite this clear superiority, why did modern science arise in Western Europe, and not in the Islamic world?

Some Muslim leaders, like some of their counterparts in early medieval Europe, had a low regard for the study of nature. Academic pursuits were tolerated, but learning was divided into traditional studies based on the Qur’an, and “foreign” studies based on knowledge obtained from the Greeks. Although there were Arabic rationalists, there were also those who saw in this rationalism a threat to the authority of the holy writings. A conservative reaction in the late tenth century, together with a decline in peace and prosperity, impeded further scientific advance in the Muslim world (Lindberg, 1992, pp. 180-181). According to the emerging Islamic orthodoxy, man was not a fully rational creature, and no room was allowed for a purely rational investigation of God’s creation (Huff, 1993, pp. 100,115).

It was in this very early period of decline that the baton of science began to pass gradually into the hands of the Europeans, especially those who came into contact with the wealth of Islamic knowledge in Spain. Perhaps the next most significant event was the fall of Muslim-held Toledo in 1085. Many important Arabic and classical works from its vast library were translated into Latin. Within a century, these had begun to filter into centers of learning all over Europe. They arrived at a time when scholars such as Anselm (1033-1109) already were reviving the role of reason in faith. Their arrival coincided also with the development of the university as a legal entity with political and intellectual autonomy (Huff, 1993, p. 335). No similar institution appeared in the Arabic world until the twentieth century due, in part, to the orthodox Muslim concept of nature and reason. Religious constraints also played a role in late medieval Europe, but an academic world committed to the biblical views of man’s rationality and freedom of choice provided a fertile ground for the rise of modern science
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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:15 pm

June 21, 431: "When they discover that Cyril of Alexandria intends to open the Council of Ephesus without waiting for the arrival of John of Antioch who is supposed to be its president (he has been delayed by flooding) bishops of the East sign a formal act demanding delay, but Cyril will ignore them and condemn Nestorius and order John to break communion with him." (ChristianHistoryInstitute.org)

This event illustrates very thoroughly how the Church became bogged down in political controversy after the Edict of Milan "legalized" Christianity just over one hundred years earlier. Indeed, later generations have found Nestorius innocent of heresy, that there was little wrong in his theology and Christology. His condemnation was as much a result of Cyril’s selfish ambition as any real fault in his thinking, a victim of hair-splitting and convoluted theological debate driven by religious egotism.

When it comes to understanding divine mysteries such as the nature of God, could it be that we sometimes enter into debates that are really beyond our scope of understanding? Is not the best expression of theology an obedient life that reflects the nature and teachings of Christ?

Two excellent sites that provide insight in the teaching of Nestorius: http://www.nestorian.org/nestorian_theology.html http://www.academia.edu/2248412/Nestori ... anism_PRO_

June 22, 431: Cyril refuses to wait for the arrival of the eastern bishops and convenes the conference without them. Nestorius and his allies were condemned in absentia. A bit of a lopsided approach, maybe? Ah well, one could say that it was politically expedient... http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 29696.html

June 23, 1626: " A vendor, slitting open a giant codfish at Cambridge fish market finds a rancid, half-digested copy of a volume of the martyr John Frith’s shorter works in its belly." (CHI.org)

June 24, 64: "Roman Emperor Nero begins persecuting Christians (see issue 27: Persecution in the Early Church)." (CHI.org)

June 25, 1529: "The Swiss agree to the first Peace of Kappel between Protestant and Catholic cantons." (CHI.org)

June 26, 1892: "Pearl S. Buck, Presbyterian missionary to China and author of the bestselling The Good Earth (1931), is born." (ChristianityToday.com)

"The Good Earth" is a must read for those who believe that the value of our work on the land has more than just monetary value.

June 27, 444: "Cyril, patriarch of Alexandria and author of several writings on the dual natures of Christ, dies. He opposed Nestorius, who supposedly taught there were two separate persons in the Incarnate Christ, one divine and the other human. Historians doubt, however, whether or not Nestorius actually taught this. In any case, Cyril deposed Nestorius in 430 (see issue 51: Heresy in the Early Church)." (CT.com)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jun 28, 2015 6:21 pm

June 28, 195: Believed to be the date of the death of Irenaeus, early church leader, disciple of Polycarp and witness to his martyrdom. In his lifetime, this wise and steadfast disciple of Jesus Christ accomplished many things for the Kingdom including refuting heresy by referring to the direct teachings of Christ as given through John and Polycarp, evangelizing large areas of Gaul (modern-day France) and compiling many of the early writings of the Apostles and thus preserving them for inclusion in the Canon of the Scripture we have today.

https://www.christianhistoryinstitute.o ... oday/6/28/

June 29, 67: Presumed date of the beheading of the Apostle Paul - https://www.christianhistoryinstitute.o ... oday/6/29/

Face it with a grin - June 30,1637: "William Prynne, an outspoken and dogmatic Puritan is pilloried in company with Henry Burton and John Bastwick. Prynne’s ears are cropped and he is branded with the letters “S.L.,” standing for “Seditious Libeler.” On his way back to prison, he writes some Latin verses claiming the S.L. stands for stigmata laudis (a pun meaning either “sign of praise,” or “sign of Laud”—Archbishop William Laud is his main persecutor). (TodayinChristianHistory.com)

June 30,1974: "Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr., and a church deacon were slain by a crazed gunman in Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church, where her son, the assassinated civil rights leader, once preached." (StudyLight.org)

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/j ... hurch-1974

July 1, 1903: Baptism of the Indian warrior, Geronimo - http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30673.html

July 2, 1752: The first English Bible published in America rolls off presses in Boston. (ChristianityToday.com)

July 3,1880: "Prussia declares that clergy are subordinate to the state." (TiCH.com)

July 4, 371: "Against his will, Martin is consecrated bishop of Tours. To escape the press of the world, he had founded the first monastery in France." (TiCH.com)

July 4, 1970: "American Presbyterian missionary Francis Schaeffer observed in a letter: 'If standards are raised which are not really scriptural,... it can only lead to sorrow. If we try to have a spirituality higher than the Bible sets forth, it will always turn out to belower.' " (SLO.org)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jul 05, 2015 7:45 pm

Following a musical theme this week with a look at some hymns that were written over the centuries.


July 5, 1767: “Death of ministerial student Michael Bruce at twenty-one years of age. He had written the hymn “How Happy is the Child Who Hears” and other poems showing some talent but did not receive credit for them for a hundred years, his literary executor having passed them off as his own productions.” (christianhistoryinstitute.org) The poem, later put to music, appears here:

O happy is the man who hears
Instruction’s warning voice;
And who celestial Wisdom makes
his early, only choice.

For she has treasures greater far
than east or west unfold;
And her rewards more precious are
than all their stores of gold.

In her right hand she holds to view
a length of happy days;
Riches with splendid honours
are what her left displays.

She guides the young with innocence,
in pleasure’s paths to tread,
A crown of glory she bestows
upon the hoary head.

According as her labours rise,
so her rewards increase;
Her ways are ways of pleasantness,
And all her paths are peace.

Scottish Psalter and Paraphrases, 1781

July 6, 1846: "Birth of John H. Sammis, American Presbyterian clergyman and author of the hymn, 'Trust and Obey.' " (StudyLight.org)



July 7,1851: "Birth of Charles A. Tindley, African-American Methodist preacher and songwriter. His most enduring gospel hymns include 'Stand By Me,' 'Nothing Between,' 'Leave It There' and 'By and By.' " (SLO)



July 8, 1792: "Birth of Lowell Mason, Presbyterian pioneer of congregational singing. He composed over 1,000 hymn tunes, including BETHANY ('Nearer, My God, To Thee'), DENNIS ('Blest Be the Tie That Binds'), and HAMBURG ('When I Survey the Wondrous Cross')". (SLO)



July 9, 1838: "Birth of Philip P. Bliss, American gospel singer and songwriter. His best-remembered hymns include 'Wonderful Words of Life,' 'It is Well with My Soul' and 'Let the Lower Lights Be Burning.' "(SLO)



July 9, 1843: "Birth of Ralph E. Hudson, sacred composer and music publisher. His most enduring hymns include 'At the Cross' and 'Blessed Be the Name.' "(SLO)



July 11, 1713: "Death of Baptist hymnwriter Joseph Stennet who produced hymnals and wrote a few hymns that are still remembered, chiefly, “Another Six Day’s Work Is Done.” " (CHI.org)



(Should have posted the last one this morning, I guess... :-) )
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:02 am

July 12, 451: "Because of clashes between Christian factions, Roman Emperor Marcian issues a law against brawling in churches and against holding meetings in private houses or in the streets." (ChristianHistoryInstitute.com)


July 13, 1778: "Anglican clergyman and hymnwriter John Newton wrote in a letter: 'It is perhaps the highest triumph we can obtain over bigotry when we are able to bear with bigots themselves.' " (StudyLight.org)

July 14, 1614: "Death of Camillus de Lellis at Rome. After a wild life as a soldier, he underwent a conversion experience, served the sick, and founded the Agonizants, an order to care for the sick and minister to the dying." (CHI.com) Who knows how a changed life can affect a culture!

July 15, 1823 : "In Rome, the church known as St Paul's Outside the Walls was destroyed by a fire.Its original edifice was erected in AD 324 by the Roman emperor Constantine." (SLO) This building, which was said to have been constructed over the burial place of the Apostle Paul. had stood for 1435 years. However, it's rebuilding began almost immediately and it reopened 5 years later. The complete reconstruction took many more years.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... a_BW_1.JPG

July 16,1814: "Baptism of twenty-seven-year old Cai Gao by missionary Robert Morrison at a remote spot in the hills along the shore of Macao. Cai Goa will go on to destroy his idols and to assist with Chinese publications before his death of lung disease less than three years later." (CHI.org)

July 17, 180: "Seven men and five women who had been captured carrying "the sacred books, and the letters of Paul" are tried before Roman proconsul Saturninus. Since none would renounce their Christian faith, all 12 were beheaded (see issue 27: Persecution in the Early Church)." (ChristianityToday.com, Persecution in the Early Church)

July 17, 1674: "Isaac Watts, author of about 600 hymns, is born in Southampton, England." (CT.com) In his younger days, Issac Watts complained about the dullness of the music in the churches of his day. So in response to his father's challenge to provide something better, Watts began to write hymns, and more hymns... below is a hymn which he wrote with a modern adaptation. I think Watts might have been impressed!



Or this traditional sound -



July 18, 64: "The Great Fire of Rome begins, and to direct suspicion away from himself, young Emperor Nero blames the city's Christians. A persecution followed in which Christians were (among other punishments) burned alive (see issue 27: Persecution in the Early Church)." (CT.com)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Jul 19, 2015 12:22 pm

July 19, 1393: "Martin of Mayence is burned as a heretic at Cologne because he belongs to a sect known as “Friends of God” and refuses to observe the days and hours of prayer and worship commanded by the Church, regards all Christians as priests, maintains that outward works have no merit before God, and preaches that the Lord Jesus suffered more in bearing the judgment of God than in enduring the pain of the cross." (christianhistoryinstitute.org) - leaves one wondering if there ever was a time when the "church" didn't devour its own who dared to differ?

July 19, 1848: "More than 300 men and women assemble in the Wesleyan Chapel at Seneca Falls, New York, for the first formal convention to discuss "the social, civil and religious condition and the rights of women." The event has been called the birthplace of the women's rights movement." (christianitytoday.com) "...movement.", as in "the pendulum swings"?

July 20, 1593: "Henry IV of France renounces Protestantism and adopts Catholicism in the Church of St. Denis, Paris." (chi.org) Some by conviction, some by convenience? "How do I (love) mock thee? Let me count the ways..."

http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30040.html

July 21, 1900: "Albert Schweitzer obtained his license to practice Theology" - an interesting read about a very ambitious man -

http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30662.html

"If the Bible is true, its teachings must be put into practice. Although he was world famous as an organist and theologian, and was an expert on organ building--not to mention on the life and music of Johann Sebastian Bach--Albert decided to become a medical missionary to Africa. His decision was made because of one of Christ's parables. Jesus told of a rich man who ignored a beggar named Lazarus that sat at his gate..." (Christianity.com)

July 22, 259: " Dionysius is elected bishop of Rome. His commentaries had won many to faith, and his labors helped restore a church decimated by severe persecution." (chi.org)

July 22,1620: "A small congregation of English Separatists, led by John Robinson, began their emigration to the New World. Today, this historic group of religious refugees has come to be known as the 'Pilgrims.' " (SLO)


July 22,1865: "Birth of Peter P. Bilhorn, sacred composer. He produced over 1,400 hymns in hislife, including 'I Will Sing the Wondrous Story' and 'Sweet Peace, The Gift of God's Love.' " (SLO)



July 23,75 (or 78): "Martyrdom of Apollinaris, bishop of Ravenna, said to have been a disciple of St. Peter." (chi.org)

July 23,1702: "The Camisards, French Protestants of Languedoc, break into open revolt when they hear a rumor that a priest at Pont de Montvert intends to execute some of his Camisard prisoners, whom he has held and tortured. They burn his house, kill him, and liberate the prisoners. This begins a savage war that leads to their extermination." (chi.org) "Sacred warfare", indeed...

http://www.britannica.com/topic/Camisard

July 24: Thomas A. Kempis honored this day by the Episcopalian Church. He was a beacon of light and virtue in a time of severe corruption in the Church -

http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 29887.html

July 25, 1587: "Japanese strong-man Hideyoshi bans Christianity in Japan and orders all foreign Christians to leave the country." (chi.org)

July 25,1741: "English revivalist George Whitefield wrote in a letter: 'Your extremity shall be God's opportunity.' "(SLO)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby TexasBred » Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:47 pm

Why is this the church devouring it's on??

July 19, 1393: "Martin of Mayence is burned as a heretic at Cologne because he belongs to a sect known as “Friends of God” and refuses to observe the days and hours of prayer and worship commanded by the Church, regards all Christians as priests, maintains that outward works have no merit before God, and preaches that the Lord Jesus suffered more in bearing the judgment of God than in enduring the pain of the cross." (christianhistoryinstitute.org) - leaves one wondering if there ever was a time when the "church" didn't devour its own who dared to differ?


Yet this is sacred warfare??

July 23,1702: "The Camisards, French Protestants of Languedoc, break into open revolt when they hear a rumor that a priest at Pont de Montvert intends to execute some of his Camisard prisoners, whom he has held and tortured. They burn his house, kill him, and liberate the prisoners. This begins a savage war that leads to their extermination." (chi.org) "Sacred warfare", indeed...
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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:51 pm

TexasBred wrote:Why is this the church devouring it's on??

July 19, 1393: "Martin of Mayence is burned as a heretic at Cologne because he belongs to a sect known as “Friends of God” and refuses to observe the days and hours of prayer and worship commanded by the Church, regards all Christians as priests, maintains that outward works have no merit before God, and preaches that the Lord Jesus suffered more in bearing the judgment of God than in enduring the pain of the cross." (christianhistoryinstitute.org) - leaves one wondering if there ever was a time when the "church" didn't devour its own who dared to differ?


Yet this is sacred warfare??

July 23,1702: "The Camisards, French Protestants of Languedoc, break into open revolt when they hear a rumor that a priest at Pont de Montvert intends to execute some of his Camisard prisoners, whom he has held and tortured. They burn his house, kill him, and liberate the prisoners. This begins a savage war that leads to their extermination." (chi.org) "Sacred warfare", indeed...


Should have a "facetious" emoticon. It was called sacred warfare by others, not by me! I cannot see that Jesus would support his followers killing others. When the disciples wanted to call down fire from heaven on the Samaritans, Jesus said "You do not know what manner of spirit you are of; for the Son of Man came not to destroy people's lives but to save them."
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:18 am

August 2, 1946: "English literary scholar and Christian apologist C. S. Lewis wrote in a letter: 'Apologetic work (making an argument in defense of an idea) is so dangerous to one's faith. A doctrine never seems dimmer to me than when I have just successfully defended it.' " (StudyLight.org)

Lewis was not the first to have successfully defended the faith and then been plagued by doubts. This past week another such example came to mind as I thought about the Jewish prophet, Elijah. In a showdown between the God of Israel and the prophets of the false god, Baal, Elijah and a huge crowd of witnesses just seen fire fall from heaven and consume his water-logged sacrifice to the true God of Israel. He subsequently ordered the prophets of the idol, Baal, killed on the spot.

Even so, in spite of this amazing display of the power of God, Elijah ran for his life when he was threatened for his actions against the forces of evil, believing that he was the only one left who worshiped God in all of Israel. (1 Kings 18, 19)

Elijah, like Lewis and countless other worshipers of God, show that believers can be adversely affected by appearances and circumstances.

That is when God sends a message made for the situation just as He did for Elijah when He said,"I still have left in Israel seven thousand followers who have not bowed their knees to Baal or kissed the images of him.” (1 Kings 19:18, NET)

Then hundreds of years later we see the example of a discouraged John the Baptist, the one who so powerfully announced the incarnation of Jesus the Savior to Israel and the nations. Even this great voice of truth had his time of doubt as he languished in prison for confronting the immoral lifestyle of Herod. (Think of the recriminations if John were alive today...)

He sent messengers to Jesus with this question, “Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?” (Matthew 11:3, NET)

Elijah, John the Baptist, C.S. Lewis - these are some very significant progenitors of the faith who sometimes struggled with doubt. Yet, because of their faith in the preserving power of God they could claim the prize of eternal life even though each of them - as we all will - eventually surrendered their lives to the grave.

No matter what our lot in life might be, we can be assured that Jesus will never abandon His followers, saving their souls even though our material existence is threatened or destroyed.



August 3,1739: "English revivalist George Whitefield wrote in a letter: 'I am no friend to sinless perfection. I believe the existence (though not the dominion) of sin remains in the hearts of the greatest believers.' " (SLO)

August 4, 1792: "By order of revolutionaries, all houses of worship close in France." (ChristianHistory.net)

August 5, 1930: Birth of Neil Armstrong. While he is famous for being the first human to set foot on the moon, what is less publicized is his faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. (christiandiarist.com)

August 6, 1945: Little Boy is dropped over Hiroshima. See this for an example of the indiscriminate nature of war -
http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30784.html

August 7, 1954: Wang Ming-Dao preached his last sermon at the tabernacle on this day - http://www.christianity.com/church/chur ... 30806.html

August 8, 1471: "Thomas a Kempis, Dutch mystic and devotional author of The Imitation of Christ, dies at age 91. In his classic, Thomas wrote, "We must imitate Christ's life and his ways if we are to be truly enlightened and set free from the darkness of our own hearts. Let it be the most important thing we do, then, to reflect on the life of Jesus Christ." (ChristianHistory.net)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.

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Re: This week in Christian History

Postby burnt » Sun Aug 09, 2015 8:18 pm

August 9, 1765: "English founder of Methodism John Wesley wrote in a letter: 'You have but one Pattern; follow Him inwardly and outwardly. If other believers will go step for step with you, well; but if not, follow Him!'" (StudyLight.org)

August 10, 70: "Roman troops, sent by Emperor Vespasian to put down a Jewish rebellion, break through the walls of Jerusalem and destroy the temple. Some said that the event occurred on the same day of the year as the earlier destruction of Solomon's temple by Babylonians." (ChristianHistory.net)

For a fuller account of how this came about, read here - http://www.christianitytoday.com/ch/200 ... ml?start=1
(There is some discrepancy in the date of the event.)

Is it coincidence that the destruction of the temple happened exactly as Jesus had prophesied not long before it occurred? "Jesus left the temple and was going away, when his disciples came to point out to him the buildings of the temple. But he answered them, “You see all these, do you not? Truly, I say to you, there will not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down.” " (Matthew 24:1,2, ESV) Indeed, when the temple was torched and burned down, the gold on the walls melted and ran into the cracks between the stones. Looters then pried the stones apart to recover every bit of gold...

After Jesus made this prophetic statement his disciples asked him when this would take place and for signs preceding it. After telling them that no man knows the dates, among much other disturbing news, Jesus told them the most important thing for them is that they must be very vigilant for the end and not allow any false teachers - and there would be many - to deceive them. This multi-layered prophesy of Jesus still holds meaning for us today and his followers will do well to take his warning seriously. Read the entire account of his words to his disciples here - https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?s ... ersion=ESV

It is important to remember that just as the destruction of the temple and other things unfolded exactly as he prophesied, so will the rest of the events that Jesus said would come to pass. "All men will hate you because of me, but he who stands firm to the end will be saved." Who is watching and ready for his coming?

August 11, 1527: "The Zurich town council agrees to suppress Anabaptists." (Christianhistoryinstitute.org)

August 12, 1952: "American missionary and martyr Jim Elliot wrote in his journal: 'I must come to be aware of Satan. He may never get me into hell, but he may cause God shame in defeating me. Preserve me from the lion, Lord. Let him not swallow me up.' " (Chi.org)

August 13, 1783: "Death of Tikhon of Zadonsk a bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church, notable for his spiritual writings that stressed love and forgiveness. “Do we forgive our neighbors their trespasses? God also forgives us in His mercy. Do we refuse to forgive? God, too, will refuse to forgive us. As we treat our neighbors, so also does God treat us.” " (Chi.org)

August 14, 1248: "Construction of the Cologne Cathedral begins. Workers completed it on the same date in 1880." (Ch.n) Just as the disciples were impressed by the construction of the Temple, we remain impressed with the material today...

http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&l=e ... 1&&index=1

August 15, 1557: "Agnes Prest is burned to death at Southern Hay by Queen Mary’s government because of her rejection of the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation." (Chi.org)
"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root". Henry D. Thoreau.


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