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feeding

Things that come up in the daily operation of a ranch.
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Silver
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Re: feeding

Postby Silver » Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:14 am

Yup, obviously by reading all the above just been lucky here for 75 years or so.

One more interesting factoid while we are at it: 10 pounds of snow when melted makes 10 pounds of water, regardles of where you live.

So if you live in a place where a reliable source of loose snow is available cows can make out just fine and would not be considered to be roughing it.

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George
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Re: feeding

Postby George » Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:39 am

Here in central Indiana where the creeks are shallow they run fast and I cannot remember a time when you could not find open water - - - but animals that are restricted to one of the barn areas for one reason or another need a source of fresh water - - -I do not feel snow would work well here except for one or two days right after it comes down as we get enough heat in the afternoon that the surface thaws and then refreezes which makes for dangerous walking and they would only have access to ice encrusted snow.
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littlejoe
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Re: feeding

Postby littlejoe » Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:13 pm

well , the water in
Canadian snow is actually measured in imperial gallons or liters or kilograms---and the plain fact is that an imperial gallon is bigger than u.s. gallon, a liter is bigger than a quart and a kilogram is WAY bigger than a pound---so of course it's gonna work better to water cows!

Our snow is horribly dry---if you want a decent drink, you gotta add some bourbon to it, altho--once again---them damn snowbacks got the edge on us and rye works better~~!

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leanin' H
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Re: feeding

Postby leanin' H » Sat Dec 24, 2016 11:39 am

The great thing about the cattle business is how diverse it is. What is completely foreign to me works just fine in other parts of the planet. Between Silver wintering on snow and us summering on rocks, cows can make a living almost anywhere. :D 8)
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Denny
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Re: feeding

Postby Denny » Sat Dec 24, 2016 12:08 pm

leanin' H wrote:The great thing about the cattle business is how diverse it is. What is completely foreign to me works just fine in other parts of the planet. Between Silver wintering on snow and us summering on rocks, cows can make a living almost anywhere. :D 8)


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DejaVu
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Re: feeding

Postby DejaVu » Sun Dec 25, 2016 2:10 pm

whether they are all grazing the same direction (shows they are competing for grass)


FH, I've been thinking about this and don't cattle generally graze into the wind? which would make them graze mostly in the same direction. The other day I happened to see the neighbor's cattle moving through a section of wheat and milo stalks. There was plenty to eat and they were all moving in the same direction. We had a fairly strong north wind and they were grazing into it. Yeah, I'l overthinking it. It's what I do best! :lol:
Merry Christmas to all. :santa:

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Faster horses
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Re: feeding

Postby Faster horses » Sun Dec 25, 2016 3:01 pm

Oh yes, they do. I should have qualified that by saying "unless the wind is blowing." Keep watching, you will be amazed at what you see or what the cattle will tell you. At times they will tell you when they are out of 'desirable' feed when we think they have plenty. Same with hay. Put out a bad bale and put out a good bale, then notice which one they eat first. You can't fool 'em.

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DejaVu
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Re: feeding

Postby DejaVu » Sun Dec 25, 2016 5:22 pm

Sorta like driving into a pasture and you just know they're unhappy or restless. Awhile back I had a young bull meet me at the pickup. He was growling-not a bellar-just a low growl. The mature bull had jumped the fence and went to the neighbors. There were several things the young bull was saying. He was for sure tattling on the old bull and then he was probably asking me to not bring him back as the young one had all the cows to himself.
On another site there was an interesting topic about the tail switch on bulls and using it as an indication of fertility. A lot of bulls don't even have a switch. They look almost like a rat tail. Hum........
One more- I was told if you take a bulls weight and divide it by .66 you will know what his daughters mature weight will be. So a ton bull will leave 1320 lb females.

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Faster horses
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Re: feeding

Postby Faster horses » Sun Dec 25, 2016 6:22 pm

If you take a bulls weight, gee, at what age and what time of year. That makes it vary a lot.
I've heard you can tell if a cow is bred by the way the hair stands up on the tail head. Never mastered that tho. :D
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DejaVu
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Re: feeding

Postby DejaVu » Sun Dec 25, 2016 7:14 pm

Sorry-my mistake-mature weight of the bull. I'd say it would be an guesstimate as to time of year but I wouldn't do it when he's just come home from breeding.
Bonsma had a lot of ways of telling a bred cow. I wish I could have met him. When the hair on a cows tail head stands up, it's usually a sign in my herd she's been ridden and is open :lol:
We were preg-checking this fall and my other half started calling them before they got to the chute and with accuracy. He said he was looking at how full they were under their belly, right in front of the udder.
There's so many signs we never notice. Too many distractions..cell phones, money worries, family, weather.................

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Silver
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Re: feeding

Postby Silver » Sun Dec 25, 2016 7:28 pm

This fall I was quite confident calling a yearling open at preg testing time. Much to my surprise she was announced bred by the vet. I had never seen a freemartin come in bred before.

DejaVu
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Re: feeding

Postby DejaVu » Sun Dec 25, 2016 8:36 pm

About 10% of heifers born twin to a bull are fertile. Your lucky day Silver.


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