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2/3's would vote Independent

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Anonymous

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Poll: Two-thirds would vote indie

By TIM MAK | 1/20/12 7:53 AM EST
More than two-thirds of Americans would consider voting for a third-party presidential candidate, while nearly half of all voters think a third-party is needed, a new poll shows.

Sixty-eight percent of voters said they would “definitely vote for” or “consider voting for” a third-party candidate whom they agreed with on most issues, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll Friday.

Only 28 percent said that they would definitely not vote for an independent candidate.

Americans are split over whether the creation of a third party is necessary, however — 48 percent consider a third party necessary, while 49 percent say that it is not necessary.

The most likely to support the creation a third party? A majority of independents (61 percent), liberals (60 percent) and moderates (51 percent) said that a third party was necessary.

The Washington Post-ABC News poll was conducted Jan. 12-15, with a sample of 1,000 adults and a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points..



Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0112/71718.html#ixzz1k1eQQJFE

This was being discussed on the local radio this morning...The fact that everyone is sick and tired of the R's and the D's-- and want some more choices...

It was brought up that the candidate that is least behoding to either other party and could probably best get an independent party support at this time would be Ron Paul...
 

hypocritexposer

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Oldtimer said:
This was being discussed on the local radio this morning...The fact that everyone is sick and tired of the R's and the D's-- and want some more choices...

It was brought up that the candidate that is least behoding to either other party and could probably best get an independent party support at this time would be Ron Paul...



there would be more candidates running if you had a third party.......
 

Triangle Bar

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Oldtimer said:
It was brought up that the candidate that is least behoding to either other party and could probably best get an independent party support at this time would be Ron Paul...

I'm confused.... doesn't Ron Paul have one of those R's by his name? So, doesn't that mean the fence riding independents already have that choice?
 
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Anonymous

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Triangle Bar said:
Oldtimer said:
It was brought up that the candidate that is least behoding to either other party and could probably best get an independent party support at this time would be Ron Paul...

I'm confused.... doesn't Ron Paul have one of those R's by his name? So, doesn't that mean the fence riding independents already have that choice?

In many states the Independents are left out of the choosing of the R candidate... They require you to be a registered party member to cast a vote or caucus...
 

Steve

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as of today there are 21 choices.

2 Independents,

2 Democrats

5 libertarians

12 Republicans
http://2012.presidential-candidates.org/

the problem isn't with the lack of choices, but with how the media decides who is worth reporting on and who is invited to the debates..
 

Steve

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Oldtimer said:
Triangle Bar said:
Oldtimer said:
It was brought up that the candidate that is least behoding to either other party and could probably best get an independent party support at this time would be Ron Paul...

I'm confused.... doesn't Ron Paul have one of those R's by his name? So, doesn't that mean the fence riding independents already have that choice?

In many states the Independents are left out of the choosing of the R candidate... They require you to be a registered party member to cast a vote or caucus...

why should an independent get to vote in a republican primary?
 

hypocritexposer

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Steve said:
Oldtimer said:
Triangle Bar said:
I'm confused.... doesn't Ron Paul have one of those R's by his name? So, doesn't that mean the fence riding independents already have that choice?

In many states the Independents are left out of the choosing of the R candidate... They require you to be a registered party member to cast a vote or caucus...

why should an independent get to vote in a republican primary?


and why should a Dem?
 

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Touting an Independant candidate is just Methuselah's way of saying, "Hand my man Boo-Rock another 4 years!"

That is EXACTLY what will happen if folks begin to vote Independant. Remember H. Ross Perot? He handed Slick Willie Klinton the Presidency on a silver platter. Sometimes it not nearly as important who you are voting FOR, as it is who you are voting AGAINST.

While I am not thrilled with any of the 'Pubs, I'll vote for whoever gets the nomination, as any of them would be infinitely better than the mulatto who currently resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
 

hypocritexposer

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loomixguy said:
Touting an Independant candidate is just Methuselah's way of saying, "Hand my man Boo-Rock another 4 years!"

That is EXACTLY what will happen if folks begin to vote Independant. Remember H. Ross Perot? He handed Slick Willie Klinton the Presidency on a silver platter. Sometimes it not nearly as important who you are voting FOR, as it is who you are voting AGAINST.

While I am not thrilled with any of the 'Pubs, I'll vote for whoever gets the nomination, as any of them would be infinitely better than the mulatto who currently resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.



so are yo saying OT wants barry for another 4 years, so he can continue to get his free stuff :???: :???:



shocked I say........
 

loomixguy

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Methuselah never saw anything free but what he didn't like it. After spending a lifetime sucking on the government tit as a "law and odor" guy, his sense of entitlement is just as strong as Shaniqua's, Tyrone's, L-A's, or anybody else who regularly dranks 40's.
 

Larrry

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ot hasn't figured it out, people are pissed about the way things are going, and we have the leftwingernuts running the show. Now think about it ot, things going badly and the dems in charge. Do you see a pattern there? Now if they were happy with the obama regime and they were getting jobs as he promised then the people would be flocking to the left. But no he has flocked the American people. Yet there are stupid leftwingernut libtards making excuses for his failure to accomplish anything other than improving his golf game. But by your admission there are some of the smarter ones leaving him.
 
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Gary Johnson: 'Mickey Mouse Would Poll 15 Percent Against Obama And Romney'

First Posted: 1/20/12 01:53 PM ET Updated: 1/20/12 03:07 PM ET

WASHINGTON -- Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson has no qualms about running as a third party candidate, telling HuffPost in a recent interview he thinks Americans are so dissatisfied with their options that "Mickey Mouse would poll 15 percent against Obama and Romney." That's actually not as far-fetched as one might think.

According to a new poll, more than two-thirds of American voters would consider voting for a third party candidate and a full 48 percent say a third party is necessary. Throw in numbers like 22 percent of voters saying they would definitely vote for a third party candidate they agreed with and 28 percent saying they would flatly rule it out, and presidential frontrunners may have something to worry about.

“I think there's a real opportunity that a third party candidate could poll significantly enough to be on the stage in what would be the national debates," said Johnson, the former New Mexico governor. "I think that's a possibility
, and if that happens, I would hope to be that third party nominee to be able to do that.”

A longtime proponent of marijuana legalization and drug policy reform, Johnson was vocally opposed to his exclusion from the Republican presidential debates when he was running as a Republican. He said he is continuing to stay in the race, after having switched to the Libertarian ticket, largely as a way to promote his socially liberal and fiscally conservative message.

"I'm asked the question," Johnson said, "'Aren't you going to take votes away from the Republicans?' My response is, 'Oh yeah, all those Republicans that want to see marijuana legalized and think Mitt Romney is going to accommodate that?"

Johnson also hopes to pick up the national dialogue where Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), a fellow libertarian and a GOP presidential candidate, leaves off.

"It's not about the candidates," said Johnson, "it's about the message. I really think that, I wish Ron Paul the best. Ron Paul and I have some differences, I don't know how great ... but I don't think he's going to be the nominee. So this message, this agenda dies when he's through within the Republican primary."

Shortly after announcing he would run for president on the libertarian ticket, Johnson held a two-hour live chat with the Marijuana Policy Project's Rob Kampia that had some people predicting he would make the repeal of marijuana prohibition a central pillar of his campaign.

But in his interview with HuffPost, Johnson distanced himself from that notion.

"No, it's never been central," he said of drug policy to his campaign, "but to me it's indicative of a whole bunch of other issues."

Johnson has instead made trimming federal spending his banner issue, laying out a blueprint for how to cut federal spending by 43 percent. Indeed in an election where jobs and the economy will loom large, a fiscal conservative founding his candidacy on spending cuts hardly comes as a surprise.

But as fiscally conservative politicians go, Johnson’s views are anything but vanilla.

“I believe that the fastest growing segment of the Republican party are those that are Libertarian-leaning,” Johnson said. “I have issues with the extreme right of the Republican party. I do. I always have," he added. "And I have issues with the extreme left of the Democrat party. I always have. But I don't know if I really have issues with what you'd call the extreme segment of the Libertarian party.”
 
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