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2nd Story I got in an Email

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OldDog/NewTricks

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My True Story
In the Late 60's early 70's we used Rope Wild Burrows with/off our horses in the "Saline Valley" by Death Valley, Ca.
My first Catch proved to be something like the story below:

Buckee - My Roping partner was the CCA (California Cowboys Assc. State Calf Roping) Champion and he has a good Calf Horse under Him.
My Horse was more of a Ranch Horse, Reining Horse...

We would jump 3 to 9 burrows in a bunch. As a Chase Rider I only had to watched as Buckee would Rope n Tie 2 - Maybe 3 burrows out of a bunch.
By now I had been in Camp as Jacks raided and try to steal the genies back at night... One Jack had chased me up on the hood of a Truck - with my flashlight all I could see was Eyes n Teeth and just knew he was going to clime-up there with me...

The Saline Valley had one dirt rode that ran through the valley - with our horses in Trailers we would drive that 30± mile road looking off the road for Burrows - When we saw them they were maybe a mile or two off the road back on the desert floor.

We'd spot burrows - we'd unload our horses, pull up our chinch and take off at a gallop toward our pray. After doing this a few times our horses would come out of the Trailer A LOOKING...
By this time ya had to be quick at grabbing the Horn and doing a "Pony Express Mount" or your horse was gone.)

Watching Buckee, By day three I got to think'n "I can Do That".

We had Chased Burrows about a mile and a half through ruff country and going up hill. Mr Burrow stopped, turned and stood there just looked at my horse and I - My hose would Not close in and we just stood there looking at each other. I was tied "Hard n Fast" but threw all the slack rope I had. My loop settled around that Young Jacks. Feeling like a Top Hand I baled off my horse and started down my line, Mr Jack took one look at me and started up my line, Teeth Gleaming. My horse Wisely decided "she Wanted No Part of This, Turn Tail and was headed for Parts Unknown, me a hanging on to the middle of my rope. I was covering 15' to 20' with every stride.

Buckee saw I was aheaden for a bad wreck and put another rope on Mr. Jack - - Buckee saved my A$$...


Begin forwarded message:


CHERRY PITTS

---





WHY WE SHOOT DEER

When I read the title the first time I read it as "why we shoot deer" as in why we hunt so to speak.....after reading I realized it was more like "Why we shoot deer, rather than use some other method to capture them"...this guy writes pretty well......

WHY WE SHOOT DEER

Why we shoot deer in the wild.(A letter from someone who wants to remain anonymous, who farms, writes well and actually tried this)

I had this idea that I could rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it. The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up - 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope.

The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation. I took a step towards it, it took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and then received an education.

The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope.

That deer EXPLODED. The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity. A deer-- no Chance. That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled.

There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope! .

I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.

Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder - a little trap I had set before hand... Kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite?

They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised when ...... I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and slide off to then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head--almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts.

The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly.. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective.

It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds. I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose.

That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.

Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp .... I learned a long time ago that, when an animal - like a horse - strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape.

This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run. The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head.
Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down..

Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.

I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away.

So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope......to sort of even the odds!!

All these events are true so help me God... An Educated Farmer.
 

Faster horses

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OldDog/NewTricks said:
My True Story
In the Late 60's early 70's we used Rope Wild Burrows with/off our horses in the "Saline Valley" by Death Valley, Ca.
My first Catch proved to be something like the story below:

Buckee - My Roping partner was the CCA (California Cowboys Assc. State Calf Roping) Champion and he has a good Calf Horse under Him.
My Horse was more of a Ranch Horse, Reining Horse...

We would jump 3 to 9 burrows in a bunch. As a Chase Rider I only had to watched as Buckee would Rope n Tie 2 - Maybe 3 burrows out of a bunch.
By now I had been in Camp as Jacks raided and try to steal the genies back at night... One Jack had chased me up on the hood of a Truck - with my flashlight all I could see was Eyes n Teeth and just knew he was going to clime-up there with me...

The Saline Valley had one dirt rode that ran through the valley - with our horses in Trailers we would drive that 30± mile road looking off the road for Burrows - When we saw them they were maybe a mile or two off the road back on the desert floor.

We'd spot burrows - we'd unload our horses, pull up our chinch and take off at a gallop toward our pray. After doing this a few times our horses would come out of the Trailer A LOOKING...
By this time ya had to be quick at grabbing the Horn and doing a "Pony Express Mount" or your horse was gone.)

Watching Buckee, By day three I got to think'n "I can Do That".

We had Chased Burrows about a mile and a half through ruff country and going up hill. Mr Burrow stopped, turned and stood there just looked at my horse and I - My hose would Not close in and we just stood there looking at each other. I was tied "Hard n Fast" but threw all the slack rope I had. My loop settled around that Young Jacks. Feeling like a Top Hand I baled off my horse and started down my line, Mr Jack took one look at me and started up my line, Teeth Gleaming. My horse Wisely decided "she Wanted No Part of This, Turn Tail and was headed for Parts Unknown, me a hanging on to the middle of my rope. I was covering 15' to 20' with every stride.

Buckee saw I was aheaden for a bad wreck and put another rope on Mr. Jack - - Buckee saved my A$$...


Begin forwarded message:


CHERRY PITTS

---





WHY WE SHOOT DEER

When I read the title the first time I read it as "why we shoot deer" as in why we hunt so to speak.....after reading I realized it was more like "Why we shoot deer, rather than use some other method to capture them"...this guy writes pretty well......

WHY WE SHOOT DEER

Why we shoot deer in the wild.(A letter from someone who wants to remain anonymous, who farms, writes well and actually tried this)

I had this idea that I could rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it. The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up - 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope.

The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation. I took a step towards it, it took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and then received an education.

The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope.

That deer EXPLODED. The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity. A deer-- no Chance. That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled.

There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope! .

I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.

Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder - a little trap I had set before hand... Kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite?

They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised when ...... I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and slide off to then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head--almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts.

The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly.. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective.

It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds. I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose.

That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.

Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp .... I learned a long time ago that, when an animal - like a horse - strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape.

This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run. The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head.
Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down..

Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.

I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away.

So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope......to sort of even the odds!!

All these events are true so help me God... An Educated Farmer.

Wouldn't have been RA that sent you that email, would it?
Sounds like something he would do...... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :p
 

OldDog/NewTricks

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this just came in:


Dennis this is for sure real. I use to go up to David Packerd's ranch and I believe you have been there. Well right across the drive is a large perminute pasture of at leats 100 acres. Well me and Ronny Ford my old rodeo partner as he was forman in the late 60's would drink for a couple of hours and ride the barrel some. After we drank som we would jump in the jeep and ride out into the pasture. As you know you find 3/ 4/ and 5 pointers out there ans with spreads of around 2 feet and better. Well Ronny would drive and I would rope. I have had over 2 dozen right at the front finder of the jeep and with my rope going. I would think a lot about what this guy said about roping a deer. Fortunenetly I was never drunk enough to throw my rope even as I hit their hornes many times just to make them run faster. I believe if I had I would have gotten a bigger lesson then this guy wrighting this letter. May be even hurt a lot. I did one night when we were driving back to the house see eyes at night in a chain lenked fince garder area David had around his house. The gate was left open about 2 '. Ronny and I went in in the dark and closed the gate. We were looking for a fawn so the girls could see it. We could here it running around in the garden but could not see it as it was too dark. It ran right next to me and I through my rope and bingo I cought it. Now after a couple of pints I wasn't drunk but was not sober either. I had no idea how big this deer was but after it pulling on the rope a lot I knew it was not a big one. Well I called out to Ronny and the 2 of us climed down the rope and we found a spike about 3" long. We hauled him over to the barn and tied his legs like we would tie a calf. We had a couple of more drinks and took him into Ronny house for the girls. Well Lori jumped on the back of the couch and Ronda ran out of the room. Ronny and I went out side for another drink and we heard a lot of noise in the house. Well the spike started kicking and pulled out of the ropes on his feet but he was so scared he just layed there. Well Ronny and I carried him out side and the girls made us let hin loose so we did. Well then we had to get back in the jeep and find another to shoot for dinner. It only took us about 15 minutes and we were back with another for dinner. Well I thought you would enjoy this one. I guess I wasn't too smart back in those days as I could have shot a nice big one for my wall but David P asked us to leave the big ones for his friends so we did. I could have shot all the pigs I wanted but never did as we were always drinking and having fun on the barrel.
 

OldDog/NewTricks

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I think I've post this story before but here goes:

Bucky was about a mile off across the Desert Floor.
I could just berlly hear Him EEE Haw he was chasing something up a draw.
I figured what ever it was it was headed for a Saddle in the hill on my side.
Thinking "I'll try to beat him there" I was spurring up the steep Mountain when the big drown Rocks around me started Moving ""Mountain Sheep" big Red ones.
I started to rope one BUT on second thought where I was and my experience
with Mr. Jack I soon had second thoughts.

A State Ranger came into camp that night. As I was telling the story around the camp fire - Mr, Ranger Said "I had my Spotting Scope on you - your Lucky - they are covered by every Law the State Has...
 
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