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3 generations - video 4 min

cowsense

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H 76...... Very functional trio of cows; good udders & fleshing ability. What are the bloodlines?
Didn't realize you lived in the suburbs.......right in the shadow of skyscrapers; housing developments & busy roads! :lol:
 

Hereford76

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cowsense said:
H 76...... Very functional trio of cows; good udders & fleshing ability. What are the bloodlines?
Didn't realize you lived in the suburbs.......right in the shadow of skyscrapers; housing developments & busy roads! :lol:

its boomin!
 

Northern Rancher

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Now that's porn for a cowman-those cows look oddly familiar. Things do look a touch more prosperous grass wise since I was there-they sure have slicked up nicely.
 

WVGenetics

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That can't be a donor cow--she's actually nursing a calf! They have to be unproven, overfat, virgin heifers to make donors. Just kidding, your cows look great and were certainly enjoying their treat. Just wondering if you were goin to try to breed the cow you are flushing back to carry a natural calf again this year?
 

Hereford76

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WVGenetics said:
That can't be a donor cow--she's actually nursing a calf! They have to be unproven, overfat, virgin heifers to make donors. Just kidding, your cows look great and were certainly enjoying their treat. Just wondering if you were goin to try to breed the cow you are flushing back to carry a natural calf again this year?

i'm going to try and make a policy of flushing a cow like this every 10 yrs or so and putting a portion of the embryos in storage - kind of a failsafe. i wish we would have done it in the past.

what would be the reason not to try and breed her back - she's got roughly 75 days to breed back before the end of my calving season.

i really love the younger cow in the bunch - i can lose track of time watching her.
 

WVGenetics

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Hereford76 said:
WVGenetics said:
That can't be a donor cow--she's actually nursing a calf! They have to be unproven, overfat, virgin heifers to make donors. Just kidding, your cows look great and were certainly enjoying their treat. Just wondering if you were goin to try to breed the cow you are flushing back to carry a natural calf again this year?

i'm going to try and make a policy of flushing a cow like this every 10 yrs or so and putting a portion of the embryos in storage - kind of a failsafe. i wish we would have done it in the past.

what would be the reason not to try and breed her back - she's got roughly 75 days to breed back before the end of my calving season.

i really love the younger cow in the bunch - i can lose track of time watching her.

It can be hard to get them to breedback after flushing as they often can take longer to cycle again and sometimes develop cystic ovaries. We flushed a cow once and never could get her to breed again. Plus it moves her later in the calving season, but we try and do the same thing--get her flushed once, bred, and back into production. I definitely think your approach to using embryo transfer is the way to go. It's those proven cows that we need more of. By the way, how old is that cow you are flushing?
 

Hereford76

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WVGenetics said:
Hereford76 said:
WVGenetics said:
That can't be a donor cow--she's actually nursing a calf! They have to be unproven, overfat, virgin heifers to make donors. Just kidding, your cows look great and were certainly enjoying their treat. Just wondering if you were goin to try to breed the cow you are flushing back to carry a natural calf again this year?

i'm going to try and make a policy of flushing a cow like this every 10 yrs or so and putting a portion of the embryos in storage - kind of a failsafe. i wish we would have done it in the past.

what would be the reason not to try and breed her back - she's got roughly 75 days to breed back before the end of my calving season.

i really love the younger cow in the bunch - i can lose track of time watching her.

It can be hard to get them to breedback after flushing as they often can take longer to cycle again and sometimes develop cystic ovaries. We flushed a cow once and never could get her to breed again. Plus it moves her later in the calving season, but we try and do the same thing--get her flushed once, bred, and back into production. I definitely think your approach to using embryo transfer is the way to go. It's those proven cows that we need more of. By the way, how old is that cow you are flushing?

man i hope we don't screw her up. she's a 99 model. weaned a good calf every year plus a set of twin heifers in 09, can't seem to screw up her udder on her daughters.... kind of cow that makes some bulls look better than they really are.

edited = oops, the coyotes got her calf in 2010
 

WVGenetics

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Hereford76 said:
WVGenetics said:
Hereford76 said:
i'm going to try and make a policy of flushing a cow like this every 10 yrs or so and putting a portion of the embryos in storage - kind of a failsafe. i wish we would have done it in the past.

what would be the reason not to try and breed her back - she's got roughly 75 days to breed back before the end of my calving season.

i really love the younger cow in the bunch - i can lose track of time watching her.

It can be hard to get them to breedback after flushing as they often can take longer to cycle again and sometimes develop cystic ovaries. We flushed a cow once and never could get her to breed again. Plus it moves her later in the calving season, but we try and do the same thing--get her flushed once, bred, and back into production. I definitely think your approach to using embryo transfer is the way to go. It's those proven cows that we need more of. By the way, how old is that cow you are flushing?

man i hope we don't screw her up. she's a 99 model. weaned a good calf every year plus a set of twin heifers in 09, can't seem to screw up her udder on her daughters.... kind of cow that makes some bulls look better than they really are.

edited = oops, the coyotes got her calf in 2010

Chances are you won't. That cow we had trouble with had an unsuccessful flush so it was probably a preexisting problem. Your cow sounds like the kind you use to make a herd bull for yourself and still end up wishing you had more daughters out of. I grew up with commercial Hereford cattle and I'm a sucker for 'em, but we just don't have the quality you have out there--you'd run the wheels of a vehicle trying to find 3 functional Hereford cows like that out here. We've got a small registered herd, but are a ways from where we need to be. Just acquired a Montana bred bull for cleanup though and although his horns will make it hard for us to sell any sons, I think his daughters will be the right kind.
 

Hereford76

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WVGenetics said:
Hereford76 said:
WVGenetics said:
It can be hard to get them to breedback after flushing as they often can take longer to cycle again and sometimes develop cystic ovaries. We flushed a cow once and never could get her to breed again. Plus it moves her later in the calving season, but we try and do the same thing--get her flushed once, bred, and back into production. I definitely think your approach to using embryo transfer is the way to go. It's those proven cows that we need more of. By the way, how old is that cow you are flushing?

man i hope we don't screw her up. she's a 99 model. weaned a good calf every year plus a set of twin heifers in 09, can't seem to screw up her udder on her daughters.... kind of cow that makes some bulls look better than they really are.

edited = oops, the coyotes got her calf in 2010

Chances are you won't. That cow we had trouble with had an unsuccessful flush so it was probably a preexisting problem. Your cow sounds like the kind you use to make a herd bull for yourself and still end up wishing you had more daughters out of. I grew up with commercial Hereford cattle and I'm a sucker for 'em, but we just don't have the quality you have out there--you'd run the wheels of a vehicle trying to find 3 functional Hereford cows like that out here. We've got a small registered herd, but are a ways from where we need to be. Just acquired a Montana bred bull for cleanup though and although his horns will make it hard for us to sell any sons, I think his daughters will be the right kind.

well if his daughters make good ones i guess i wouldn't feel to bad about not selling the sons... who is the bull cleaning up after AI?
 

WVGenetics

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HH Advance 5098R Reg.# 42576352 Phenotypically, he's exactly what we need, big bodied, square hipped, and still sound at 6 years old. From an EPD standpoint, he does what we need in order to sell to commercial guys, calving ease and milk with pretty good carcass data.
 

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