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Agenda 21 - How Many Know?

Mike

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what this is actually about?

Read this: (from the United Nations website)

http://www.un.org/esa/dsd/agenda21/res_agenda21_02.shtml

Study all you can about "Agenda 21" and make up your own mind. Please.
 

Lonecowboy

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DeWeese: We’re almost exclusively focused right now on the issue of Agenda 21 and sustainable development. This is something, as we said, that came from the [United Nations’] Rio 1992 Earth Summit and has been slowly implemented in almost every community in the country. Now it is being more rapidly implemented in those communities. Now, after 15 years of trying to warn people what this was about, people are beginning to see that something is wrong and that this is a policy of control. Lots of people think it’s a policy of conservation and environmental protection, and that’s how it’s sold. But in fact, when you look at all aspects of it, the “social equity” aspect and “social justice,” it covers every aspect of our lives, from how our communities are developed to what you can do in your own home to control population.

TNA: You mention Agenda 21. This is a United Nations program that came out of the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. I was there in Rio at the summit and afterward I was telling people, “Look, this is crazy; they are going to try and micro-manage every aspect of our lives and our communities.” The response was, “That’s the United Nations, they’re crazy. Don’t take them seriously.” But 2012 will be 20 years later, and we’re actually seeing this being implemented. So how does this work?

DeWeese: In fact, if you go to your city council and say, “You’re implementing a United Nations program” — that’s when they look at you like you have two heads, and they escort you out the door. Your city councilmen and county commissioners will tell you, “No, no, this is just a local thing we are doing, we came up with this idea.” Whereupon I usually ask the question: “Can you explain to me how your documents are the same, verbatim, as those in Singapore?” They try to put forth that these are all local initiatives, but in fact, there are organizations who helped write Agenda 21. Probably the most prominent one is ICLEI, the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives. Now, your city councils in over 600 American cities are paying dues to this organization; paying for them to come in, set up software, set up programs, train staff, put these programs in place — pure “sustainable development” from Agenda 21....

“Smart growth” is a part of sustainable development. You hear this talked about a lot. If you’re sitting in your car somewhere in a traffic jam and somebody’s on the radio talking about smart growth and how we want to get people out of their cars and reduce traffic and have light rail trains and public transportation, you might think that sounds like a pretty good idea. What they’ve done, what they do with smart growth is draw a circle or wall around your community and they say there’ll be no new development outside of this “urban sprawl.” … In fact what they’ve done, as soon as they’ve put that wall around you, is they created an artificial shortage of property and that means that property costs skyrocket....

TNA: This has a huge impact on property rights and being able to do anything with your property. Whether it’s rural or semi-rural, undeveloped or developed, that impacts it. Along with that we have the universal building codes that they are putting in that are going to have various energy components: new buildings having to be built with certain so-called recycled and environmentally approved components.

DeWeese: The shorthand version is that everything associated with sustainable development means higher costs and shortages. They continue to talk about sacrifice, that we need to sacrifice our overuse of energy — that you should take colder showers, your home should be colder in the winter — and to enforce that they are beginning to install these “smart meters.” They do an analysis of your home and find out what your energy use is, and they will tell you in order to meet the standards the community has set, you need to get a new roof, or windows, or new energy-efficient appliances in order to comply. They put the smart meters in to control whether you can turn up your thermostat or not, control whether you can take a cold shower or a warm shower, and all that comes together. In Oakland, California, where they have implemented this, they have estimated that the average cost to the homeowner in California to implement these policies and comply, is about $35,000 per home. If you don’t comply, what happens? They always tell you all of this is voluntary, but either you will be fined, or you will not be able to sell your home if you don’t comply.

These kinds of controls [are draped] over every aspect of your lives — look at the reason why. We’re told it’s because we have to cut our carbon footprint; it’s because of climate change, global warming. If people were paying attention over the last year, the global-warming behemoth has been so discredited — a massive meltdown, there’s no credibility to it at all, yet communities are still trying to implement these programs based on that as the excuse.

TNA: The communities locally that are fighting this — do you see anywhere in the country where they are making progress?

DeWeese: This is the exciting part: After 15 or so years of fighting this thing — and, as you well know, [it’s] a lonely battle with people shipping you tinfoil hats in the mail — I’ve never seen anything like what’s happened in the last year, with the Tea Party movement. They are catching on; they are figuring it out. There’s enough going on in the local communities that people can see it now. I’m very privileged to be working with a county commissioner in Carroll County, Maryland. He’s the politician we’ve been looking for all these years. He has an entire council, all five of them, that are on board to fight this stuff. The first thing they did was vote to shut down the sustainable development office in the county. They bought out the contract of the guy they hired to run it, got him out of there. Then, the next thing they did was stop the contract with ICLEI, so they are not paying them dues any more, running them out of town. Now they are ready to take on the EPA and all of its dire water controls that they are working to put in place. This is a guy who understands what he’s dealing with, and the need to get this message out to county commissioners across the country; I’m working with him to create tools, videos, and so forth to get out to every county commissioner in the country. I’m working with people all over the country; the phone will not stop ringing with people wanting more information, telling me what they are doing in their community. I’m traveling more, speaking more, it’s exciting.
http://www.thenewamerican.com/tech-mainmenu-30/environment/7964-active-against-agenda-21
 

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