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Hayguy

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:clap: good on you Gcreek, did you ever get the trapper situation sorted out?

can you call in a wolf as you can coyotes using critter in distress sounds/calls? if so has it met any success or just an exercise in futility?
 

Wyoming Wind

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Awesome...may put a little more fear in them? When our season was opened here for 2 months a few years back the short hunting season really made them more respectful of people; or it made them more sneaky! Read somewhere last week that an area in Colorado that has a large number of elk, more than they want, were proposing introducing wolves to manage the elk pop. Really? Wow. I wanted to strangle the guy who came up with that idea!
 
A

Anonymous

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jodywy said:
plane got 3 coyotes in the bottom of my meadow yesterday, tapper said it would of taken him awhile to get them ,

My SIL and his buddy have gotten a half dozen coyotes down here on the creek in the last couple weeks by calling them in...The first day they called in 4-- with one coming in about 5 minutes after they shot the first one...But now they are a little skittish.....
 

jodywy

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Oldtimer said:
jodywy said:
plane got 3 coyotes in the bottom of my meadow yesterday, tapper said it would of taken him awhile to get them ,

My SIL and his buddy have gotten a half dozen coyotes down here on the creek in the last couple weeks by calling them in...The first day they called in 4-- with one coming in about 5 minutes after they shot the first one...But now they are a little skittish.....
these were skiddish , but they never been hunted from a plane before so saved alot of time
 

gcreekrch

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hayguy said:
:clap: good on you Gcreek, did you ever get the trapper situation sorted out?

can you call in a wolf as you can coyotes using critter in distress sounds/calls? if so has it met any success or just an exercise in futility?

In answer to your first question.
http://www.eab.gov.bc.ca/wildlife/wl...WIL-005%28a%29


Some guys have had success calling. Most of them have used howling to bring them in. A couple used a rabbit in distress call. I got a remote electronic call last summer, haven't really tried it in earnest yet but looking forward to see if it works.
 

gcreekrch

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Our MLA finally got a meeting set up for a few of the ranchers to voice concerns to Minister of Natural Resources, Steve Thompson.

Here is the submission Debbie and I put forward. It was the only one he asked for a copy of. :D

Hello,

Thank you for giving this opportunity to hear our problems and give our view to the predator issue.

As you are no doubt aware, the ranching business is financially marginal at best. The last 9 years we have had challenges that are out of our control what with BSE, rising input costs such as fuel, parts, labour and in our part of the province, personal livestock losses in excess of $100,000 due solely to predators. These costs have put an effective damper to the growth and profitability of our enterprise.

Some losses due to predation have always been expected due to the location of our ranch but the escalating populations of wolves and grizzlies over the last decade have made such a devastating reduction to ungulate species of wildlife that they are now becoming to reley on livestock as their prey in earnest.

Low prices in the fur market,public perception of predators, and legislative restrictions on predator management are dimming the future even more for the ranching community. There is little incentive for the younger generation to take the reins from the aging ranchers of today and the toll that predators are taking on our herds is one more stumbling block in the path to seeing this transition take place.

Liken this issue to thieves stealing your paycheck on a regular basis with little or no chance of you or the police catching them! There are so many "gangs" with no choice but to steal to survive that when one gang is removed, the next gang moves in.

With this said, we are asking you to put in place a full time program that will compensate livestock producers for costs incurred when the hiring of experienced predator mitigators is our only option to protect our livestock. We would like to have the use of this option not only for actual killing of livestock but to include harrassment and wounding as well.
Harrassment incurs it's own costs such as weight loss, reduced conception rates, cattle being moved off their own ranges, (which in our case led to being charged for tresspass of cattle on a neighboring unfenced range) and increased monitoring and retrieval of displaced herds. This is all very costly and time consuming for a business that is cash strapped and short of labour already.

The past program for predator mitigation was a good one that only needed some minor adjustment to make it work more effectively but lack of financial support and producer dissatisfaction led to its demise. Producers who knew that predators were a problem but could not find a verifiable kill in order to begin the mitigation process became very frustrated with the rules and support to keep it in place was lost.

The problem caused by the status quo of inexperienced trappers and increased bag limits and seasons is that wolf packs are fragmented leading to more packs and more pups being born. Experienced mitigators are capable of removing the complete pack and thereby making a positive impact on reducing the population. It is possible that even further methods of reduction will need to be adopted before this epidemic is brought under control.

We would also ask for an LEH season be opened for grizzly bears in areas where they have recovered to the point of becoming a nuisance.

Furthermore, any program that may be put in place needs to be done quietly in order to not be jeopordize by the unknowing, well meaning general public.

In closing, we hope you will act on this issue immediately as the game herds that First Nations and resident hunters
depend on for sustenance are fast becoming non-exsistant. Compound this with the fact that livestock are the only other choice predators can turn to and you have an industry that cannot sustain any more costs being in serious jeopordy of itself becoming extinct.
 

gcreekrch

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Nice furred female with house cougar inspecting. :D
P2090703.jpg


Down! Stay!
P2090706.jpg


Sunrise a few mornings ago.
P2040700.jpg
 

lefty

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The letter says it all very well written . Minnesota had a dozen wolf trappers , who were funded through the USDA , No funding remains in place for wildlife services . Wolves are under state managment for now . The DNR has no population goals or limits in place for wolves in MN.
There are somewhere between 3500 & 5000 wolves in MN Right now .
Ranchers here feel the bite too .
Its real simple you can have wolves or you can have Agriculture But you cant have both at the sametime . Wolves have way more rights in America than people do
 

Soapweed

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That is a very well written letter, Dave. Hope it does some good.

My old neighbor was philosophizing several years ago. He said, "There has always been people with no common sense, but in the past they have weeded themselves out so it didn't matter. Now, the people with no common sense are the ones that have the money, so it has become a big problem." He definitely had things figured out.
 

Jinglebob

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Nice puppy. Now go get some of the big ones. :wink:

Amazing how long it took to get rid of these at one time and the libs have caused them to come back and be a problem once more. If they had went about it right, I would be all for re-introduction. I think, logically, they should have re-planted them where they were first removed and I am thin king that would have been in Central Park. Get them thick east of the Mississipi and then come from the west coast and meet in the middle of the country at last, as that would have been the normal course of when they were eliminated. this area in the middle would have been the last country to get them all removed so it should be the last area to have them re-introduced. Simple logic to me. But then simple logic doesn't seem to work with those with simple minds. :)
 

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