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balancer F1 (gelbvieh/red angus) bull

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elwapo

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Here is a picture of a balancer bull we will be selling at our sale this spring.
 

PPRM

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Elwapo,


Some things I like about that bull. Nice deep round and depth throughout. That bull has a classy look to him and seems well proportioned. He screams that he will produce calves that will grow and yield well. He is the kind I look for.

One thing some may mention is the way he stands. I think it may be more to do with the two dimensional picture than what he truly carries himself. But the stance in the picture, well his left hind leg appears to indicate post legged. I'd like to see the Bull move, because I have seen where in a picture it looks one way, but real life shows something else...

My overall opinion, I like the Bull a lot, just want to see him move. I look at a lot of bull pictures and think to myself, "I have steers that I like better." Not the case here. For my program, I'd be interestd in his numbers if i were looking at him.....

You appear to be doing well in my book,

PPRM
 

DOC HARRIS

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PPRM- Interesting assessment of this bull, and I agree with your observations - just one different take on THIS picture. Not only would I care to see him move, but I would like to see a front, rear, and top picture also. The Balancers are generally well 'balanced' and of very fine phenotypes, and this one view of this bull tends to verify that premise. In regard to his being "post-legged" - I believe that if you will observe closely - the tail switch is exactly over and behind the left hock, and that could make him appear post-legged. Probably not enough of a negative to diminish his value appreciably.

DOC HARRIS
 

elwapo

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Thanks for your assessments, it is good to get feedback. I think you nailed it Doc, this guy does have a decent set to his legs. I am carefull when selecting red angus A.I. Sires to make sure there is enough heel under them.
 

PPRM

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Yep,

elwapo and Doc, read my post carefully and you'll see that I wasn't saying he was post legged, but that I needed more looks than this one. Reason I brought this up is I have seen people post pictures of their bulls and someone will say it IS post legged. My comment is the way they stand in a two dimensional picture can influence the appearance....


BTW, I started with a Gelbvieh cross bull when i was putting my cows together. These cows were saleyard buys that worked for me. A little feed and mineral will do wonders. Anyway, this bull reminded me of that bull, except that bull was Black. He is the base for most of the cows I have now. His calves have that great classy look to them and always performed well.

Before we sold him, we sent him to Don Peter at Frontier Genetics to have him collected. I AI new cows to him. Anyway, Jesse told me people on a national level from different breeds would see him and want to know all about him........He impressed a lot of people, just like these bulls of yours impress me elwapo.....keep after it,


PPRM
 

Faster horses

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elwapo, would you discuss your comment, "enough heel under them" a bit further? I am interested in learning what you meant by that statement. It was some of our bulls that I got the post-legged feedback, I think. So I would really like to learn more about what goes on with a post-legged bull, like your heel comment.

And thanks in advance.
 

elwapo

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Faster horses. I stand to be corrected, but the angle of the leg adversely affects how an animal stands on his feet. For a post legged animal the leg does not have enough angle (set) which creates a short stiff gait and puts more walking pressure on the front of the foot. The sicle hocked animal is the other extreme which shows in an over-curvature of the leg which doesn't fully extend when the animal walks. This flaw tends to have the animal walk on the heel which can result in long toes and lameness. both are flaws found in all breeds but more common in some. When I say I like more heel it is more saying I do not want sickle hocked animals.
 

DOC HARRIS

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elwapo and Faster horses- Excellent reply from elwapo! I would suggest another thought here: when a bull mounts a cow during breeding, a greater proportion of his body weight is concentrated on his rear legs, and in the process of mating, a tremendous muscular contraction involving the muscles and ligaments of the hindquarters - such as the stifles (knee joints), the hocks and ankles is exerted. As elwapo contends, a genetically incorrect alignment of these structures reduces the effectiveness and value of a bull and shortens his breeding life. If he becomes "stifled", he is useless as a breeder. Therefore it is critical that his skeletal anatomy and physiology be optimal in order capitalize on his genetic merits. Phenotype and EPD's are crucial - as are feet, legs and joints. Having more "heel" enables the bull to have a more stable foundation when walking and breeding - and traveling about. Small details are of supreme importance in livestock management!

DOC HARRIS
 

Faster horses

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I well-know about the sickle-hocked business. Learned the hard way, when one of our bulls was walking on his dewclaws, basically and his toes were turned way up. Soon as we spotted it, we got rid of him. It was UGLY!!! But I am afraid we have not paid enough attention to the post-legged part of it.

Thanks for your replies, both of you, and I do think I learned something today!
 

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