• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Beckton Halfmann Hustler R588

Help Support Ranchers.net:

rancherfred

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Nebraska
We used this bull on our heifers last summer. They were synced and mass bred on the first day of August. If the chart I have is right they should be due on May 12, but I had four today and three a couple of days earlier. Has anyone else used him that can comment on a rather short gestation? One or two could be passed off as a fluke but with that many I think that there must be a genetic component.
 

3 M L & C

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2010
Messages
1,182
Reaction score
0
Location
Kansas
Havn't used him but the last two years I used a red angus bull with similer bw and ced numbers and they have been about the same amount of time earlier compared to a chart due date. Calves came out pretty small, but had plenty of fire and grew fast. How big are your calves?
 

rancherfred

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Nebraska
I haven't gotten any calves weighed yet, but they look like they will probably be upper 60s or lower 70s. They sure aren't acting slow, they are up and running about as soon as they hit the ground.
 

tumbleweed_texn

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2006
Messages
255
Reaction score
0
Location
Among the sagebrush and greasewood.
Rancher Fred, I am no geneticist so Im sorta taking a blind stab at this, but would'nt the damn determine gestation time or length? I could see the bull having an influence on his calves when they start having babies. I was always under the impression that it was the dams internal and biological clock which decided how long the baby cooked in the womb. This is sorta similar to the "chicken or the egg" question. Is it the calf who has decided he has stayed inside long enough and thus initiates the labor? If this were the case, I could see the paternal side having a direct influence on gestation time. Or, is it the dam spurred into action by Mother Nature who determines when the new baby will make its appearence?

You actually asked a thouhht provoking question. I have never thought about this until now and my curiousity is for sure piqued. I know different breeds of cattle will oftentimes have differing amounts of time for gestation. I can't remember each breeds length of time, but if I recall correctly, there may be as much as 10 days disparity between some breeds.

We have used Beckton bulls on our cattle and have always had really good results. As a matter of fact we've got one out there now and I'm thinking we have two. I really like their bull program.

Again, that was a good question and I'm going to do a little research on this to try and find an answer.

Have a good day.

Tex

P.S.
We have been getting some much needed moisture here in NE Wyoming. Yesterday started pretty and in a bit the rains came and quickly turned to snow. This morning it has been a nice steady rain/snow mix.
 

gcreekrch

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
11,463
Reaction score
194
Location
west chilcotin bc
Our herd started 10 days early the last 2 years. Last year we were 15% done before we started and this year we were at 26% by due date.

Have talked to others that have experienced the same thing. Resign yourself to the fact that you are now in calving mode. :wink: :lol:
 

rancherfred

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Nebraska
tumbleweed_texn said:
Rancher Fred, I am no geneticist so Im sorta taking a blind stab at this, but would'nt the damn determine gestation time or length? I could see the bull having an influence on his calves when they start having babies. I was always under the impression that it was the dams internal and biological clock which decided how long the baby cooked in the womb. This is sorta similar to the "chicken or the egg" question. Is it the calf who has decided he has stayed inside long enough and thus initiates the labor? If this were the case, I could see the paternal side having a direct influence on gestation time. Or, is it the dam spurred into action by Mother Nature who determines when the new baby will make its appearence?

You actually asked a thouhht provoking question. I have never thought about this until now and my curiousity is for sure piqued. I know different breeds of cattle will oftentimes have differing amounts of time for gestation. I can't remember each breeds length of time, but if I recall correctly, there may be as much as 10 days disparity between some breeds.

We have used Beckton bulls on our cattle and have always had really good results. As a matter of fact we've got one out there now and I'm thinking we have two. I really like their bull program.

Again, that was a good question and I'm going to do a little research on this to try and find an answer.

Have a good day.

Tex

P.S.
We have been getting some much needed moisture here in NE Wyoming. Yesterday started pretty and in a bit the rains came and quickly turned to snow. This morning it has been a nice steady rain/snow mix.

If I understand the biology correctly the calf actually initiates parturition. I don't know the signaling mechanism. If my memory is correct, then the bull could have an affect on the timing of parturition.
 

3 M L & C

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2010
Messages
1,182
Reaction score
0
Location
Kansas
I have been told thats part of the reason a bull gets a low bith weight is because his calves are born and develope early (shorter gestation) I guess you would call it. Tumbleweed your opinion makes a lot of sense though. The last two years my heifers that i aied had a lot of calves two weeks early compaired to red angus table of gestation.
 

Baldie Maker

Active member
Joined
Jan 3, 2009
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky
Fetal stress, thus levels of cortisol determine when the calf is born. Bulls with higher calving ease generally sire calves tht arent gestated as long.
 

Bullhauler

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
843
Reaction score
0
Location
South Dakota
gcreekrch said:
Our herd started 10 days early the last 2 years. Last year we were 15% done before we started and this year we were at 26% by due date.

Have talked to others that have experienced the same thing. Resign yourself to the fact that you are now in calving mode. :wink: :lol:

I would say you need to start going by a new gestation table. I turned out all of my bulls on July 1 last year. The first calf came Mar 26. By the old long due date that most calving books print I wasn't due til April 12. By that date I already had over 100 calves on the ground. Good thing I don't go by the books so-called "due date".
 

gcreekrch

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
11,463
Reaction score
194
Location
west chilcotin bc
Bullhauler said:
gcreekrch said:
Our herd started 10 days early the last 2 years. Last year we were 15% done before we started and this year we were at 26% by due date.

Have talked to others that have experienced the same thing. Resign yourself to the fact that you are now in calving mode. :wink: :lol:

I would say you need to start going by a new gestation table. I turned out all of my bulls on July 1 last year. The first calf came Mar 26. By the old long due date that most calving books print I wasn't due til April 12. By that date I already had over 100 calves on the ground. Good thing I don't go by the books so-called "due date".

Good point. So what has changed? Bulls have been basically the same kind and from the same source for 20 years.

Got to be global warming. :lol:
 

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,263
Reaction score
51
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
gcreekrch said:
Bullhauler said:
gcreekrch said:
Our herd started 10 days early the last 2 years. Last year we were 15% done before we started and this year we were at 26% by due date.

Have talked to others that have experienced the same thing. Resign yourself to the fact that you are now in calving mode. :wink: :lol:

I would say you need to start going by a new gestation table. I turned out all of my bulls on July 1 last year. The first calf came Mar 26. By the old long due date that most calving books print I wasn't due til April 12. By that date I already had over 100 calves on the ground. Good thing I don't go by the books so-called "due date".

Good point. So what has changed? Bulls have been basically the same kind and from the same source for 20 years.

Got to be global warming. :lol:

It's Bush's fault. :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The Australian Angus Association lists a Gestation EPD (EBV they call it) for bulls...Since they list many of the most used American bulls- you can look up the gestation time for many of our A.I. bulls...

The shortest gestation bull that I have ever used was N Bar Prime Time D806- with calves coming from heifers 20 days early...Totally fine, extremely vigouous, light weight calves... Up in a couple minutes and sucking... I think some were reaching for the teat before they hit the ground... :wink: A neighbor that used him on his heifers had the same experience... Easiest AI bull I've ever calved heifers by...

With the bulls I used last year- this year the first calves started coming 7 days early using a 283 day gestation table....
 

Latest posts

Top