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Canada’s Risk Mitigation Measures Have Serious Shortcomings

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Japan’s 34th BSE Case Reinforces Fact That Canada’s Risk Mitigation Measures Have Serious Shortcomings



Source: R-CALF

January 7, 2008



Billings, Mont. – Japan recently announced its 34th case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or mad cow disease, in a 15-year-old beef cow – the oldest case of all the BSE cases in Japan. Fortunately, because Japan tests every head of cattle for BSE before allowing the beef into the human food chain, none of the products from this animal will harm anyone. However, because BSE has an incubation period of up to eight years, it will be many, many years before Japan completely removes this disease from its cattle herd.



While Japan is doing a much better job testing for BSE than Canada, R-CALF USA remains extremely concerned that policies implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) that allow more high-risk Canadian cattle into the United States are putting the U.S. cattle herd and U.S. beef consumers at risk for this incurable and always fatal disease.



“Japan has instituted some of the most stringent mitigation measures of any country – they test every animal that enters the human food chain, they remove the high-risk tissues from animals of all ages and they have a very stringent feed ban, so they have taken some reasonable steps to contain and eradicate this disease,” explained R-CALF USA CEO President/Region VI Director Max Thornsberry, a Missouri veterinarian who chairs the group’s animal health committee.



“Countries like Japan that started out only detecting a few cases in the first few years continue to find even more cases now that those countries are testing more cattle for BSE,” he said. “When applying that knowledge to Canada, we find Canada is following the same track – only detecting a few from the outset, but then the numbers begin to increase.



“However, Canada is not testing near the numbers of cattle that Japan is, and Canada only has a voluntary testing program, which means there’s likely numerous cattle in Canada that are going undetected for BSE, and that puts the U.S. cattle industry at risk because currently we are commingling Canadian cattle and beef with U.S. cattle and beef,”
Thornsberry pointed out.



“It’s also critically important for the public to be able to sort through the spin that USDA and Canada use to try to diminish Canada’s BSE problem,” he continued. “They claim that Canada’s most recent case, announced on December 18th, was only Canada’s 11th case of BSE, but the facts actually say otherwise. It was Canada’s 13th case total, the 12th incident in cattle born in Canada.


“In 1993, one case was imported from Great Britain, and USDA and Canada try to say that the Washington state case discovered in December 2003 was a U.S. case, but that animal actually was imported from Canada,” Thornsberry said.



“The two true U.S. cases – one in a Texas cow, and one in an Alabama cow – have been classified as atypical strains of BSE, meaning they were not the same strain that caused the European epidemic and that now has infected the Canadian cattle herd,” he emphasized.



r-calfusa.com
 

TimH

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Hey Oldtimer, Exactly how do Canada"s "risk mitigation measures" differ from those of the USA??

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Mrs.Greg

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Hey Grand-Pooba of R-calf.....Have a meeting today and get into the Crown Royal....Dang Canucks and thier diseased whiskey.....ooopsss I mean Beef :roll: :roll:
 

don

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it says source: r-calf. that about says it all. time for the three stooges to do another episode.
 

Sandhusker

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Three posts and none of them attempting to refute the information in the article...... typical.
 

Mrs.Greg

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Sandhusker said:
Three posts and none of them attempting to refute the information in the article...... typical.
sighhhhh,did you see that r-calf was the source,here I'll post a definition for you...K??????

Propaganda:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Propaganda [from modern Latin: 'propagare', "extending forth"] is a concerted set of messages aimed at influencing the opinions or behavior of large numbers of people. Instead of impartially providing information, propaganda in its most basic sense presents information in order to influence its audience. The most effective propaganda is often completely truthful, but some propaganda presents facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis, or gives loaded messages in order to produce an emotional rather than rational response to the information presented. The desired result is a change of the cognitive narrative of the subject in the target audience.

Get it Sandhusker :roll: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

TimH

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Sandhusker said:
Yeah, I get it. That's four posts now ......

And 2 posts by an R-calfer without explaining the difference between American and Canadian "risk mitigation measures".
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
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Anonymous

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TimH said:
Sandhusker said:
Yeah, I get it. That's four posts now ......

And 2 posts by an R-calfer without explaining the difference between American and Canadian "risk mitigation measures".
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


“The two true U.S. cases – one in a Texas cow, and one in an Alabama cow – have been classified as atypical strains of BSE, meaning they were not the same strain that caused the European epidemic and that now has infected the Canadian cattle herd,” he emphasized.
 
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Manitoba_Rancher said:
Yes OT but how many cases have been covered up in the US?

How many in the higher risk areas of Canada are going into the food chain :???: :shock: :(
 

Tam

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Oldtimer said:
Manitoba_Rancher said:
Yes OT but how many cases have been covered up in the US?

How many in the higher risk areas of Canada are going into the food chain :???: :shock: :(

By Higher risk areas do you mean the provinces and US STATES like Montana that border Alberta? Tell us Oldtimer how many Montana cows are going into the California slaughter plants then into both human and animal food chains in the US?
 
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Tam said:
Oldtimer said:
Manitoba_Rancher said:
Yes OT but how many cases have been covered up in the US?

How many in the higher risk areas of Canada are going into the food chain :???: :shock: :(

By Higher risk areas do you mean the provinces and US STATES like Montana that border Alberta? Tell us Oldtimer how many Montana cows are going into the California slaughter plants then into both human and animal food chains in the US?

Higher risk area- would be cluster area-- in Alberta.....

Tam-- didn't you read the articles- the US has only had 2 cases- none of the same type as found in the epidemic areas of UK, Europe, Japan, Alberta-- and none of ours were found in Montana.... :wink:
 
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Anonymous

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Manitoba_Rancher said:
OT,

How many cattle in the 4'd status does Montana test?

Unknown-- as the USDA did a terrible job on their record keeping involving keeping some states cattle identified in the records...

But going with known facts- and thats what you have to use-- Canadian cattle (specifically those in Alberta) have shown to have a higher propensity of BSE than anywhere else in North America- and have the UK/European strain while that strain has not been found anywhere else....
 

don

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ot you r-calfers always do a good job of backing up usda's bogus testing program. that's why you have no credibility with canadians even when you bring up a legitimate argument; the hypocrisy is always your fallback.
 

Sandhusker

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don said:
ot you r-calfers always do a good job of backing up usda's bogus testing program. that's why you have no credibility with canadians even when you bring up a legitimate argument; the hypocrisy is always your fallback.

Where have any of "you R-CALFers" ever bragged on the USDA's testing program?

What about the credibility of those who claim to know more about the USDA's testing program than the CDC?
 

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