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Canada to impose permits on U.S. cow imports

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flounder

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Canada to impose permits on U.S. cow imports
Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:12 PM EST


OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada, which decided a year ago to require permits for the import of some live cattle and bovine products from the United States, took steps on Friday to put the required regulations into place.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said the permits would make it easier to track animals which might be linked to outbreaks of mad cow disease and other sicknesses. It hopes the system will be in place early next year.

The CFIA said in a statement it wanted to "create a more responsive, adaptable and uniform import system for bovine animals and products from the United States."

Canada banned imports of U.S. cattle and meat products for a time in 2004 after a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The ban was later eased to keep out what Canada considered to be high-risk products.

Debbie Barr, the CFIA's national manager for imports and exports, said the permits would mainly affect breeding animals as well as some animal feeds.

"(In the last year such imports) have been able to come in under the terms of exemptions from the prohibition order. But the intention is that once this regulation is in place, the prohibition order will be repealed," she told Reuters.

The new permits will not affect imports of beef, which are covered under a separate system, or cattle destined for slaughter.

The CFIA on Friday gave the public 30 days to comment on the proposed permit system.

"Permits also provide an effective means to track imported animals -- a critical component of foreign animal disease outbreak responses," the CFIA statement said.



© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.


http://ca.today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=domesticNews&storyID=2006-12-15T211206Z_01_N15380555_RTRIDST_0_CANADA-MADCOW-USA-COL.XML&archived=False




BSE import policy for bovine animals and their products
AHPD-DSAE-IE-2005-9-1

December, 2005



http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/policy/ie-2005-9e.shtml


Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed


TSS
 

PORKER

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The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said the permits would make it easier to track animals which might be linked to outbreaks of mad cow disease and other sicknesses. It hopes the system will be in place early next year.
 
A

Anonymous

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don said:
thank god there's no mention of anaplasmosis or bluetongue or ot would have a spasm.

Don't worry don-- CFIA hasn't forgot about the Canuck trade barriers--they'll keep your subsidized calves... :wink: :lol:

CN_Today 12/15/2006 5:09:00 PM


Canada Proposes New Regulations For US Cattle/Beef Imports



WINNIPEG (Dow Jones)--The Canadian Food Inspection Agency, or CFIA, is proposing regulatory amendments to create a more responsive, adaptable and uniform import system for bovine animals and products from the U.S., the government agency announced in a press release Friday.



Under proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations, U.S. animals and their products would be imported into Canada under CFIA permits, said the release. Because permits can be readily adjusted, this system would allow the CFIA to more effectively respond to new science and evolving international standards. Permits also provide an effective means to track imported animals - a critical component in responding to foreign animal disease outbreaks, the CFIA said.



The new system also would provide Canada greater flexibility to more quickly implement revisions to import policies, such as previously announced changes to bluetongue-related import requirements for U.S. cattle. The CFIA could also introduce any changes deemed necessary to Canada’s anaplasmosis and small ruminant import policies, both of which are currently under review, said the release.



The proposed amendments standardize Canada’s import controls with respect to bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, in accordance with the Agency’s BSE import policy. While the amendments focus on bovine animals and products. They also include several previously proposed provisions for other animals.



Source: Phil Franz-Warkentin, Dow Jones Newswires 204-947-1700
 

don

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well at least if we get those diseases up here you can blame canada for their existence in the states. kind of like the bse. lol. we don't get subsidies ot; like you we get assistance.
 

flounder

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PROPOSED AMENDMENTS FOR BOVINE IMPORTS FROM THE U.S.
Ottawa, December 15, 2006 - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is proposing regulatory amendments to create a more responsive, adaptable and uniform import system for bovine animals and products from the United States.

Under proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations, U.S. animals and their products would be imported under CFIA permits. Because permits can be readily adjusted, this system would allow the Agency to more effectively respond to new science and evolving international standards. Permits also provide an effective means to track imported animals-a critical component of foreign animal disease outbreak responses.

The new system would also provide Canada greater flexibility to more quickly implement revisions to import policies, such as previously announced changes to bluetongue-related import requirements for U.S. cattle. Similarly, the Agency could introduce any changes deemed necessary to Canada’s anaplasmosis and small ruminant import policies, both of which are currently under review.

The proposed amendments standardize Canada’s import controls with respect to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in accordance with the Agency’s BSE import policy. While the amendments focus on bovine animals and products, they also include several previously proposed provisions for other animals.

The proposed amendments are published in the Canada Gazette (www.canadagazette.gc.ca). Interested parties are invited to submit comments until January 14, 2007.

- 30 -

For information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Media relations: (613) 228-6682



http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/import/20061215inde.shtml





Vol. 140, No. 50 — December 16, 2006

Regulations Amending the Health of Animals Regulations and the Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Administered and Enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Statutory authority

Health of Animals Act

Sponsoring agency

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

Description

The purposes of the Health of Animals Act and Regulations are to prevent the introduction of animal diseases into Canada; to control and eliminate diseases in animals that either affect human health or could have a significant effect on the Canadian livestock industry; and to provide for the humane treatment of animals during transport.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or "mad cow disease," is a progressive, fatal neurological disease in cattle. It is part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) which also includes scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans. Research into BSE is ongoing, but this disease has been associated with the presence of an abnormal prion protein and, to date, there is no effective treatment or vaccine.

In response to the discovery of BSE in North America, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has moved to strengthen Canada's BSE-related control measures, including removal of specified risk material (SRM) from cattle at slaughter and enhancing the animal feed ban. As well, over the last two and a half years, the CFIA conducted a comprehensive analysis and consultation, including World Trade Organization notification, leading to the development of a revised BSE import policy for bovine animals and their products, which fully considers current science-based international standards for animal and public health protection and safe trade. This policy was published in December 2005 and can be found at http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/policy/ie-2005-9e.shtml.

While publication of the policy signifies the future direction, and a mechanism already exists to allow implementation for countries other than the United States, regulatory amendment is required to initiate implementation for U.S. animals and related products because specific import conditions for the United States are currently prescribed in regulations. As an interim measure, an emergency regulation prohibiting the importation of higher risk animals and products from the United States has been in place, and amended, since January 2004.

For countries other than the United States, and for some U.S. animals (e.g. cervids, camelids and restricted feeder cattle), a permitting system is used and import conditions are specified on the import permit, according to established risk management policies. For other animals from the United States, the permitting system is available but is not the only means of importing animals. Where specific conditions are prescribed in an "import reference document," that is incorporated by reference into these Regulations, shipments from the United States may enter Canada according to those conditions rather than by permit. By removing this alternative and focusing the administration of the regulatory requirements for ruminant animals from the United States on the use of permits (as is already the case for imports from other countries), a more consistent application of the new BSE import policy for bovine animals and their products will be more readily achieved. Furthermore, the use of permits for ruminants from the United States would enhance traceability in the event of a disease outbreak and would allow for flexibility and a more timely response to changes in international requirements, disease outbreaks, and evolving science.

The purpose of this amendment is to bring the import requirements related to the control of BSE for animals and products originating in the United States in line with those from other countries and thereby eliminate the need for an importation prohibition regulation for bovines and their products. In order to accomplish this, it is proposed to rely on the existing permitting system for bovine animals and products imported from the United States. The permit conditions could then reflect the criteria set out in the BSE import policy for bovine animals and their products.

Currently, the regulatory disease control measures for imports are based on section 7 of the Health of Animals Regulations which allows the Minister to designate countries or parts of countries that he considers to be free of an animal disease. However, in the case of BSE, international standards as well as the new Canadian policy no longer refer to country freedom for this disease but instead refer to categories of risk, with negligible risk being the category from which importation with minimal certification would also be acceptable. The proposed regulatory change would amend section 7 of the Health of Animals Regulations to add the possibility to designate a country or part of a country as posing only a negligible risk to better harmonize with international standards.

The Import Reference Document referred to above is a subset of the Health of Animals Regulations which sets out conditions under which live animals can be imported into Canada without a permit. Currently, it contains conditions for importing live bovines from the United States, as well as conditions for other U.S. animals and for dogs and cats from all countries. Since the Import Reference Document is incorporated into the Regulations by reference in a static manner, any time this document is amended the definition for "import reference document" must be amended in the Health of Animals Regulations to reflect the new version. The regulatory amendment covered under this impact analysis statement includes changes to the Import Reference Document.

Most significantly, the new version of the Import Reference Document no longer contains prescriptive requirements for most bovines, which means that an import permit becomes mandatory for these animals. At the same time, the Import Reference Document will be updated to reflect current science in the areas of disease control and understanding of how various species are affected by long transportation times and lack of access to food and water.

Specifically, the current version of the Import Reference Document, published on June 20, 2003, is changed as follows.

The criteria for importing ruminants, other than cattle for immediate slaughter, have been removed. It is proposed that these animals may now only be imported into Canada under an import permit. It is felt that the controls in place for slaughter cattle are sufficient without the added requirements of an import permit

In addition, a number of additional minor changes have been made to the Import Reference Document for species other than bovines. These changes had previously been pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, and no objections were received. However, due to the discovery of BSE in Canada, they never proceeded to the Canada Gazette, Part II, due to other regulatory priorities.

These changes include changes for dogs, cats, and ferrets as follows:

— People wishing to bring pet dogs or cats into Canada now have the option of having a blood test performed to show that previous rabies vaccinations are still active rather than re-vaccinating animals;

— The rabies vaccination requirements for pet cats and ferrets are now brought in line with the requirements for dogs in that an inspector may now order that an unvaccinated animal be vaccinated rather than refusing to allow it to enter Canada;

— The trade name and serial number of rabies vaccines must now be included in the rabies certificate for dogs; and

— The time between inspection and importation of unaccompanied puppies has been extended from 36 to 72 hours to allow for weekend travel.

Permits will also be required for the importation of elephants and of non-human primates due to the human health risks posed by these animals. The importation of pet monkeys from the United States will no longer be allowed. Their importation from any other country was already prohibited. Non-human primates are known to pose a risk for disease transmission to the human population. The proposed permitting requirements are consistent with the standards of the World Organisation for Animal Heath (WOAH, formerly known as the OIE). Commercial shipments for research, educational and zoo purposes remain eligible.

There is evidence that there is a risk of tuberculosis with elephants imported into Canada from the United States. According to an internal memo from the U.S. Department of Agriculture dated August 28, 1996, four Hawthorn elephants tested positive for tuberculosis. On September 16, 1997, the U.S. Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration informed Hawthorn that an inspection "disclosed the following potential hazard: Employees were exposed to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis when they worked around elephants infected with tuberculosis. This letter serves as notification of the likelihood of transmission of tuberculosis from elephants to employees." Hawthorn leases animals to facilities and circuses around the world.

Additional minor changes are as follows:

— Testing requirements for equines are updated to reflect the latest testing technology.

— Additional wording has been added to indicate which animals may only be imported into Canada with an import permit to ensure that people reading the Import Reference Document in isolation do not assume that there are no requirements for commodities not specifically mentioned therein.

— A new section has been added to clarify what actions may be taken in the case of non-compliance with the provisions of the Import Reference Document. This section does not create new sanctions but rather outlines the sanction possibilities under the existing enforcement regime.

— Extra wording and headings are added to help clarify what animals are covered and how the requirements apply. As well, some terminology has been updated for the sake of consistency and ease of understanding.

Finally, it is proposed to amend the definition of "regulated animal" in the Health of Animals Regulations to include those animals (prairie dogs and other rodents) currently covered by the Prairie Dog and Certain Other Rodents Importation Prohibition Regulations so that these emergency prohibitions, put in place following the outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, may now be repealed. This will allow the CFIA to regulate the importation of these animals by permit. It is proposed to delay the coming into force of this provision until the prohibition regulation is either repealed or allowed to lapse when it expires on January 31, 2008.

Alternatives

Option 1. Maintain current regulations without changes

This option was rejected since it would not allow implementation of the BSE import policy for bovines and their products with respect to imports from the United States. This would necessitate maintaining import prohibitions against higher risk animals and products from the United States, and it will prevent the CFIA from implementing the most current import requirements. Failure to implement the new permitting requirements for elephants and non-human primates would mean not addressing a risk to human health.

Option 2. Remove prescriptive requirements in the Health of Animals Regulations and manage risks through import permits

This option will allow the CFIA to implement BSE import controls for animals and products from the United States that are in line with WOAH standards and that reflect the import policy that has been implemented for other countries.

Use of import permits would also allow for a more rapid response to changes in policy, following an appropriate consultation process and would enable the CFIA to respond to changing global patterns of disease and increasing requests for regionalization and compartmentalization in accordance with the WOAH guidelines.

This option does not result in the creation of new fees, nor does it increase the existing fee for import permits set out in the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice (CFIA Fees Notice), nor expand the application of that fee.

Option 3. Amend the Health of Animals Regulations to prescribe BSE-specific import requirements

This option would involve a major regulatory amendment to include all of the risk mitigation measures and import conditions related to BSE that are set out in the import policy. Changes to the requirements would necessitate amendments to the regulations themselves, which would be complex and prolong the time required before the import policy can be applied to imports from the United States. This option would not allow the CFIA to react quickly to new scientific developments, changes in domestic or international disease risk management policy or to changing animal health risk status in exporting countries.

Benefits and costs

Permit requirements for imports from the United States

There are a number of significant benefits to relying primarily on the use of permits for virtually all ruminants and certain of their products, which include

— Increased flexibility: the use of import permits allows a more rapid response to changes in policy, following an appropriate consultation process, and enables the CFIA to respond to changing global patterns of disease and increasing requests for regionalization and compartmentalization in accordance with the WOAH guidelines.

— Greater control: the use of permits facilitates tracking and follow-up in the event of a disease outbreak.

— Greater consistency: the use of permits brings treatment of ruminant commodities from the United States into line with requirements for other countries and puts U.S. ruminants on the same system. This will provide a greater assurance of applying Canada's new BSE import policy for bovines and their products in a consistent manner.

— Comparability with other countries: other key trading partners (e.g. Australia and New Zealand) also require permits for importation. The United States, however, has confirmed that it is not able to move to a permitting system at this time.

— Facilitation of compliance verification: the use of permits enhances the Canada Border Services Agency's awareness of the importance of an importation.

Importing with the use of a permit is already either required or available as an option under the regulations today for ruminant animals and certain of their products. The anticipated increase in the volume of imports entering the country via this permit system will occur subject to existing fees (reference CFIA Fees Notice) and the five-day service standard. Access to multiple-use permits (valid for one year) minimizes the potential administrative burden and the cost of the permits themselves, the total average cost of which is estimated to be less than 1% of the value of shipments of ruminant breeding animals (or approximately $50,000). Specifically, for the first two years, the fees are $65 for a single-use permit and $115 for a multiple-use permit in addition to the application fees ($35 and $60 respectively). After that, the fees are $35 for a single-use permit and $60 for a multiple-use permit. This compares to $180 charged by Australia and $130 charged by New Zealand for single-shipment permit issuance.

It should be noted that permits will not be needed for meat shipments, as all requirements can be included on the export certificate. Similarly, cattle imported directly for slaughter will also not require a permit.

Proposed permit requirements for elephants and non-human primates

The changes to the permit requirements for elephants and non-human primates are being considered in order to protect the animal base industry, worth billions of dollars in Canada, and also to protect valuable human lives. Although the risk of tuberculosis is relatively low, based on the number of animals presented for import and the lack of evidence of transmission of tuberculosis from those animals, elephants are known to be susceptible to a form of tuberculosis that can be spread to the human population.

Based on the expected number of applications for permits to import elephants and non-human primates per year, it is expected that the annual revenue would be $3,885. The costs to the Agency of processing these extra permit requests is expected to be $4,015.

Net benefit

Overall, this option is expected to result in net positive benefits to consumers, to Canada's multi-billion animal-based industries and to our trading partners. This option provides the most opportunities for an efficient and responsive system in the complex and dynamic global environment in which Canada manages animal disease transmission and related human health risks.

Consultation

A "Draft BSE import policy for bovine animals and their products" was released for comment by Canadians and by Canada's trading partners in May 2005. During the 60-day comment period, 20 comments were received, 14 from organizations/industries, 4 from trading partners and 2 from private individuals. The comments were generally very supportive and did not raise substantive issues.

With respect to the issuance of permits, the United States has been informed of the proposal and has not raised any objections. The provinces were also consulted and were supportive. Informal consultation of industry associations indicated that they would support this approach.

Health Canada (HC) was consulted on the current requirements for the import of non-human primates and elephants as these species can carry zoonoses (diseases transmissible to humans). HC and the CFIA jointly identified the problems with the current requirements, and this amendment addresses these problems. Alberta Agriculture and Alberta Wildlife have also expressed concerns with our current requirements for non-human primates in that they are not in accordance with international standards.

Other problems with the criteria in the Import Reference Document were identified over the course of time. As people used the Import Reference Document it became evident that there were areas where clarification was required. This was communicated both orally and in writing by field staff and industry members.

Compliance and enforcement

The proposed changes to the Import Reference Document do not affect the CFIA's compliance and enforcement policies. Regulatory infractions, including those related to the need to obtain a permit and to comply with the conditions on that permit, will continue to be identified by field staff and addressed in accordance with their regulatory inspection authorities or forwarded to Enforcement and Investigation Services for consideration and enforcement action.

Environmental impact

As the changes proposed for the Regulations do not significantly change the patterns of importation of live animals and germplasm into Canada, there is no effect on the environment from this regulatory amendment.

Contact

Dr. D. Barr, Animal Health and Production Division, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 59 Camelot Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9, 613-225-2342, extension 4608 (telephone), 613-228-6630 (fax).

PROPOSED REGULATORY TEXT

Notice is hereby given that the Governor in Council, pursuant to subsection 64(1) (see footnote a) of the Health of Animals Act (see footnote b), proposes to make the annexed Regulations Amending the Health of Animals Regulations and the Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Administered and Enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Interested persons may make representations concerning the proposed Regulations within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice. All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be addressed to Dr. Debbie Barr, Senior Staff Veterinarian, Imports, Animal Health and Production Division, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 59 Camelot Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9 (tel.: 613-225-2343, ext. 4608; fax.: 613-228-6630).

Ottawa, December 7, 2006

MARY O'NEILL
Assistant Clerk of the Privy Council

REGULATIONS AMENDING THE HEALTH OF ANIMALS REGULATIONS AND THE REGULATIONS AMENDING CERTAIN REGULATIONS ADMINISTERED AND ENFORCED BY THE CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION AGENCY

HEALTH OF ANIMALS REGULATIONS

1. (1) The definition "serious epizootic disease" in section 2 of the Health of Animals Regulations (see footnote 1) is repealed.

(2) Paragraph (c) of the definition "country of origin" in section 2 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(c) with respect to an animal product or animal by-product – other than one imported into Canada from a third country via the United States, non-fertilized ova, semen and meat as defined in the Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990 – the country into which the product or by-product was last imported for unrestricted use or the country in which the product or by-product has undergone processing that would prevent the introduction of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the product or by-product is susceptible and which can be transmitted by it and that results in its unrestricted use in that country; (pays d'origine)

2. The headings before section 7 of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

PART II

Importation

GENERAL

Designation

3. Subsection 7(1) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

7. (1) For the purpose of preventing the introduction of a disease into Canada from an animal or thing imported into Canada, the Minister may designate a country or part of a country as being free of a disease or as posing a negligible risk for a disease.

(1.1) The designation shall be in writing and be based on the following criteria respecting the country or part of the country that is the subject of the designation:

(a) the prevalence of the disease;

(b) the time since the last outbreak of the disease;

(c) the disease surveillance programs in effect;

(d) the measures taken to prevent the introduction or spread of the disease;

(e) the natural barriers to the movement of the disease;

(f) the zoosanitary infrastructure; and

(g) any other criteria relevant to the state, extent or propagation of the disease.

4. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 7:

Electronic Documents

5. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 8:

Powers of Inspectors

6. (1) The definition "import reference document" in section 10 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

"import reference document" means the document prepared by the Agency and entitled Import Reference Document, bearing the date May 31, 2006 and policy number AHPD-DSAE-IE-2002-3-3. (document de référence)

(2) The definition "regulated animal" in section 10 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

"regulated animal" means a hatching egg, turtle, tortoise, bird, honeybee or mammal, but does not include

(a) germplasm;

(b) members of the orders Cetacea, Pinnipedia and Sirenia; or

(c) members of the order Rodentia, other than

(i) prairie dogs (Cynomys sp.), African Giant Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus) and squirrels of the family Sciuridae, from any country; and

(ii) any other members of the order from Africa. (animal réglementé)

7. Section 41 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

41. (1) A person may import into Canada an animal by-product, manure or a thing containing an animal by-product or manure, other than one described in section 45, 46, 47, 47.1, 49, 50, 51, 51.2 or 53, if

(a) the country of origin, or part of that country, is designated under section 7 as being free of, or as posing a negligible risk for, any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the by-product, manure or thing is susceptible and which can be transmitted by it, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin attesting that the country of origin, or part of that country, is the designated country or part of that country; or

(b) the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin that

(i) attests that the by-product, manure or thing has been collected, treated, prepared or processed in a manner which would prevent the introduction into Canada of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced it is susceptible and which can be transmitted by it, and

(ii) shows the details of how the by-product, manure or thing was collected, treated, prepared or processed.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to manure found on a vehicle that is entering Canada from the United States if the manure was produced by animals, other than swine, that are being transported by the vehicle.

8. Subsection 41.1(1) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

41.1 (1) Despite section 41, a person may import into Canada an animal by-product or a thing containing an animal by-product, other than one described in section 45, 46, 47, 47.1, 49, 50, 51, 51.2 or 53, if an inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that the animal by-product has been processed in a manner which would prevent the introduction into Canada of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the animal by-product is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the animal by-product, provided that the animal by-product or the thing containing the animal by-product is not intended for use as animal food or as an ingredient in animal food.

9. Subsection 42.1(2) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(2) An establishment referred to in subsection (1) shall process the raw glands and organs in a manner that would prevent the introduction of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the glands and organs is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the glands and organs.

10. Subsection 45(2) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(2) An establishment referred to in paragraph (1)(b) shall process the gluestock in a manner that would prevent the introduction of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the gluestock is susceptible and which could be transmitted by the gluestock.

11. Section 46 of the Regulations and the heading before it are replaced by the following:

MEAT AND BONE MEAL, BONE MEAL, BLOOD MEAL, TANKAGE, FEATHER MEAL, RENDERING PLANT PRODUCTS, GARBAGE, SHIP'S REFUSE AND ANIMAL MANURE

46. No person shall import meat and bone meal, bone meal, blood meal, tankage (meat meal), feather meal or any other product of a rendering plant into Canada unless, in addition to the requirements of sections 166 to 171,

(a) the country of origin, or part of that country, is designated under section 7 as being free of, or as posing a negligible risk for, any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the product is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the product, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin attesting that the country of origin, or part of that country, is the designated country or part of that country; and

(b) an inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that the product has been processed in a manner that would prevent the introduction of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the product is susceptible and that can be transmitted by the product.

12. (1) The definition "fumier" in subsection 47.1(1) of the French version of the Regulations is repealed.

(2) The expression "(fumier)" at the end of the definition "animal manure" in subsection 47.1(1) of the English version of the Regulations is replaced by the expression "(fumier animal)".

(3) Subsection 47.1(1) of the French version of the Regulations is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

« fumier animal » Fumier produit par les animaux à bord d'un navire ou d'un aéronef pendant que celui-ci fait route vers le Canada ou après qu'il est arrivé au Canada. (animal manure)

13. Paragraph 49(1)(a) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(a) the Canada Border Services Agency has determined that the carcass originated in the United States; and

14. Paragraph 50(b) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(b) any animal by-product or manure that was taken or removed from an animal affected with anthrax, foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the animal by-product or manure is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the animal by-product.

15. Subsection 51.2(1) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

51.2 (1) A person may import into Canada animal blood or animal serum, other than a veterinary biologic, if it does not contain an animal pathogen or part of one and

(a) the country of origin is the United States and the blood or serum is not derived from an animal of the family Bovidae;

(b) the country of origin, or part of that country, is designated under section 7 as being free of, or as posing a negligible risk for, any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the blood or serum is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the blood or serum, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin attesting that the country of origin, or part of that country, is the designated country or part of that country; or

(c) the blood or serum has been collected, treated, prepared or processed in a manner which would prevent the introduction into Canada of any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the blood or serum is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the blood or serum, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin that

(i) attests that the blood or serum has been collected, treated, prepared or processed in that manner, and

(ii) shows the details of how the blood or serum was collected, treated, prepared or processed.

16. Subsection 52(1) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

52. (1) Despite anything in this Part, a person may import an animal by-product if the person produces a document that shows the details of the treatment of the animal by-product and an inspector has reasonable grounds to believe – based on the source of the document, the information contained in the document and any other relevant information available to the inspector and, if necessary, on an inspection of the animal by-product – that the importation of the animal by-product into Canada would not, or would not be likely to, result in the introduction into Canada, or the spread within Canada, of a vector, disease or toxic substance.

17. Section 53 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

53. (1) No person shall import into Canada any animal food that contains an animal product or animal by-product unless

(a) in the case of animal food that is carried on board a vessel, the master of the vessel certifies that no ruminants or swine – other than those imported in accordance with a permit issued under section 160 – were taken on board the vessel; and

(b) in any other case, the country of origin, or part of that country – of the animal food and each animal product and animal by-product contained in that food – is designated under section 7 as being free of, or as posing a negligible risk for, any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the food, product or by-product is susceptible and which can be transmitted by it, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the animal food's country of origin attesting that the country of origin, or part of that country, of the animal food and for each animal product and animal by-product contained in the animal food, is the designated country or part of that country.

(2) No person shall import into Canada any animal product or animal by-product that is to be used as animal food or as an ingredient in animal food unless the country of origin, or part of that country, is designated under section 7 as being free of, or as posing a negligible risk for, any reportable disease, any disease referred to in Schedule VII or any serious epizootic disease to which the species that produced the product or by-product is susceptible and which can be transmitted by the product or by-product, and the person produces a certificate signed by an official of the government of the country of origin attesting that the country of origin, or part of that country, is the designated country or part of that country.

18. The French version of the Regulations is amended by replacing the word "fumier" with the words "fumier animal" wherever it appears in the following provisions:

(a) subsection 47.1(2);

(b) subsections 47.1(5) to (8); and

(c) subsection 105(3).

REGULATIONS AMENDING CERTAIN REGULATIONS ADMINISTERED AND ENFORCED BY THE CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION AGENCY

19. Sections 14 and 15 of the Regulations Amending Certain Regulations Administered and Enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (see footnote 2) are replaced by the following:

14. The heading before section 46 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

MEAT AND BONE MEAL, BONE MEAL, BLOOD MEAL, TANKAGE, FEATHER MEAL, FISH MEAL, RENDERING PLANT PRODUCTS, GARBAGE, SHIP'S REFUSE AND ANIMAL MANURE

15. The portion of section 46 of the Regulations before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

46. No person shall import meat and bone meal, bone meal, blood meal, tankage (meat meal), feather meal, fish meal or any other product of a rendering plant into Canada unless, in addition to the requirements of sections 166 to 171,

20. Section 27 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

27. (1) The portion of subsection 171(1) of the Regulations before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

171. (1) Every person who manufactures animal food for ruminants, equines, porcines, chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, ratites or game birds shall keep, for 10 years, records that contain

(2) Paragraph 171(1)(e) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(e) the lot number and any other information used to identify each lot of animal food; and

(3) The portion of subsection 171(2) of the Regulations before paragraph (b) is replaced by the following:

(2) Every person who imports, packages, stores, distributes, sells or advertises for sale animal food for ruminants, equines, porcines, chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, ratites or game birds shall keep, for 10 years, records that contain

(a) the name, the lot number and any other information used to identify the animal food;

COMING INTO FORCE

21. (1) These Regulations, other than subsection 6(2), come into force on the day on which they are registered.

(2) Subsection 6(2) comes into force on the earlier of February 1, 2008 and the day on which the Prairie Dog and Certain Other Rodents Importation Prohibition Regulations (see footnote 3) is repealed – or, if those days are the same day, then on that day.

[50-1-o]

Footnote a

S.C. 1993, c. 34, s. 76

Footnote b

S.C. 1990, c. 21

Footnote 1

C.R.C., c. 296; SOR/91-525

Footnote 2

SOR/2006-147

Footnote 3

SOR/2003-310




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