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Changes in the Cow-Calf Industry, Vol 1, #2

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pointrider

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Hi folks! In Vol 1, #1 (posted on 7-6-05) I gave you a data set that shows the states (in the U.S.) that gained and lost a lot of 500 HEAD and and 100-499 HEAD operations between 1999 and 2004. In Vol 1, #2 I have expanded the data by adding the change in total operations (number and %) in those states, the Top 10 states in losses of total operations (number and %) and the changes in % of Inventory by herd size in the states that gained and lost large operations. I'm also giving you individual state data for the whole U.S. plus comments about the data and the trends as I see them.

Vol 1, #2 was a pretty big project for me. In doing it I quickly realized that there was no way I could type it all into the Bull Session forum at one time and make it come out readable. So, I created another blog. This one just for cow-calf data. It allows me to work on it a little at a time, and do editing and things like that which makes it easier for you, too. Also, it's easy for folks to leave comments there as well as here in this forum. I think the blog is the best solution for now (even though that format also leaves a little to be desired) because of this report and others I have in mind.

Just click on the link below to go right to Vol 1, #2. Thanks for your time, and remember, "time spent learning is time well spent." By the way, Agman left a comment after the Vol 1, #1 post. It was a tongue in cheek comment about Wal-Mart's role in the changes in the cow-calf industry. Well, Agman, you were more correct than you thought. They are part of the "food chain," and their practices such as going to prepackaged beef in their Supercenters along with their tough purchasing rules and regs have definitely cemented the trend toward more further processed foods of all kinds including beef.

Wal-Mart is still gaining overall market share in the supermarket industry, and all of this has a lot to do with how things are done in the production, feeding, processing and marketing facets of the beef industry, both in the U.S. and in other countries where they have and will have a presence. Evolution never stops. All we can do is try to understand what is happening overall and try to adjust. God willing, we will make the necessary changes and have a great beef industry in the U.S. for many years to come.

Ok. Here's the link. Thanks again! :)

http://www.cow-calf.blogspot.com
 

Cowpuncher

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We hear the number of producers in the US is 850,000. I have a lot of trouble believing that this is a current number. Do you have a total?

There are a lot of people here in Colorado that keep one or two head just to keep their land taxed as agricultural.

CP
 

agman

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Cowpuncher said:
We hear the number of producers in the US is 850,000. I have a lot of trouble believing that this is a current number. Do you have a total?

There are a lot of people here in Colorado that keep one or two head just to keep their land taxed as agricultural.

CP

If you have one animal you are considered a producer under the current census tabulation.
 

agman

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pointrider said:
Hi folks! In Vol 1, #1 (posted on 7-6-05) I gave you a data set that shows the states (in the U.S.) that gained and lost a lot of 500 HEAD and and 100-499 HEAD operations between 1999 and 2004. In Vol 1, #2 I have expanded the data by adding the change in total operations (number and %) in those states, the Top 10 states in losses of total operations (number and %) and the changes in % of Inventory by herd size in the states that gained and lost large operations. I'm also giving you individual state data for the whole U.S. plus comments about the data and the trends as I see them.

Vol 1, #2 was a pretty big project for me. In doing it I quickly realized that there was no way I could type it all into the Bull Session forum at one time and make it come out readable. So, I created another blog. This one just for cow-calf data. It allows me to work on it a little at a time, and do editing and things like that which makes it easier for you, too. Also, it's easy for folks to leave comments there as well as here in this forum. I think the blog is the best solution for now (even though that format also leaves a little to be desired) because of this report and others I have in mind.

Just click on the link below to go right to Vol 1, #2. Thanks for your time, and remember, "time spent learning is time well spent." By the way, Agman left a comment after the Vol 1, #1 post. It was a tongue in cheek comment about Wal-Mart's role in the changes in the cow-calf industry. Well, Agman, you were more correct than you thought. They are part of the "food chain," and their practices such as going to prepackaged beef in their Supercenters along with their tough purchasing rules and regs have definitely cemented the trend toward more further processed foods of all kinds including beef.

Wal-Mart is still gaining overall market share in the supermarket industry, and all of this has a lot to do with how things are done in the production, feeding, processing and marketing facets of the beef industry, both in the U.S. and in other countries where they have and will have a presence. Evolution never stops. All we can do is try to understand what is happening overall and try to adjust. God willing, we will make the necessary changes and have a great beef industry in the U.S. for many years to come.

Ok. Here's the link. Thanks again! :)

http://www.cow-calf.blogspot.com

Wal-Mart is truly a driving force in the beef and meat business. Their movement to case-ready beef product has revolutionized marketing and is a factor in growing beef demand.

Keep up the good work.
 

Soapweed

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All the gas stations and convenience stores certainly sell a lot of beef jerky these days. From my observations, there is many times the amount of stock on the shelves now compared to ten years ago. Beef jerky is pretty good stuff, and it is not cheap. It is undoubtedly not made from top quality cattle. I am guessing this has to be a factor in the top prices ranchers now receive for older cull-type cows and bulls.

I tip my hat to the sellers of jerky. They are doing a great job with their marketing.
 

Clarence

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Let's face it, today Farming and Ranching is a big money game. It is not like it was 125 years ago where your expertise and efforts were what paid off. No matter how much we talk about our land ownership and our assets, those with the wealth will eventually own it all.

It is just like playing the casino. A percentage of your earnings goes for interest. In the casino, they take lets say 8% of what you put in and if you keep playing your earnings sooner or later they will get it all.

I think this was recognized way back in bible days, They said back then that it was wrong to charge your neighbor useage. That wouldn't work in today's world. Money today is a result of someone's work or efforts it needs to be rewarded, it would not be fair to let someone use what we have earned to compete with us.

How can we deal with this today? I don't know. Get a government job I guess. Let the government tax the rest of us so the government worker can have a secure job.
 

pointrider

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Hi folks! Thanks for the good comments. I hope a lot of the folks are taking the time to go to the cow-calf blog and read the reports. If you know what's happening it can help you decide if your latest thinking (your "bottom line strategy") is in keeping with what is going on in the industry and your own priorities and values.

Cowpuncher, the number you asked about is in the first section of the Vol 1, #2 report in case you haven't looked yet. The total number of cow-calf producers was close to 850,000 back in 1999. 844,170 to be exact. But since then, the U.S. lost 69,540 of these producers leaving 774,630 in 2004.

A lot of folks are probably thinking that the number won't change much this year (2005). Record high cattle prices will help on that front, but that has nothing to do with ranches being sold for development or mergers or acquisitions and things like that. Unfortunately, cattlemen don't live forever to do spring and fall roundups on this earth, and many times the "kids" are not interested in ranching. So, the beat will go on, and evolution will continue. We will all do better if we can accept that and deal with it accordingly. At least that's my opinion, for what it's worth.

Thanks again for the comments and your interest. I'll see you on down the trail. Remember, "Trail dust is thicker than blood." (Louis L'amour) I'm proud to be on the trail with you.
 

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