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Child labor proposals draw fire from farmers

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garn

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Just another reason to vote Obama and his cronies out of office next year. If these regulations were on the book when I was kid, I would not have been able to help my step-dad when he was a hog buyer through the local sale barn. The new regulations would prohibit anyone under age 18 from working at grain elevators, feed yards, sale barns, etc as well as those under 16 from detassling corn.

More inside the link.

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20111217/BUSINESS/312170023/Child-labor-proposals-draw-fire-from-farmers

Proposed child labor laws that would essentially take kids under age 16 out of tractor cabs on farms other than on their family-owned operations have touched off a “cultural war” between farmers and the Department of Labor.

Gov. Terry Branstad, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey and 70 congressmen have sent letters to U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis urging that the rules be put off.

Supporters of the rules say that farming is dangerous and that new regulations are necessary to protect migrant children and others.

Farmers fear that any changes in rules, real or potential, could interfere with the flow of labor on their own and neighboring farms.

For instance, many Iowa farmers also work adjacent land they rent, and they worry that their children who have long driven tractors at ages of 12 or younger won’t be able to help on the non-owned land.
 

TSR

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Sure kids should be able to work anywhere, anytime as long as it benefits both them and the employer. Surely nobody would hire a teen who wasn't experienced (if that matters) just to enhance their bottomline. No thst isn't going to happen is it??? Geesh! After all there aren't many farm accidents with adults operating farm equipment is there??
 

TSR

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ranch hand said:
Tsr I can tell you are a city person by your comment!

Well you better hone your intuitive instincts. What I call my hometown -3 miles away has a population of about 350. But I have seen too many grown men killed/mamed on farm equipment to support the hiring of youngsters who for the most part this day and time are much better on the computer than the tractor.
 

ranch hand

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That is Might factor into it that the adults with the accidents never grew up learning from the bottom up. Kids need to learn at an age they will pay attention and learn to have respect for it. You take a bunch of green kids 18 and put them on machinery or working cattle and you will see the accident rate go up. How many are hurt playing football.
 

Larrry

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Personally I think the kids are safer on the farms and ranches where they are taught safety in everyday lives from the time they are in diapers, as opposed to the violent crime infested city streets
 
A

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So what percentage of kids get to grow up on a farm or ranch anymore- or even in a rural setting :???:
 

TSR

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ranch hand said:
That is Might factor into it that the adults with the accidents never grew up learning from the bottom up. Kids need to learn at an age they will pay attention and learn to have respect for it. You take a bunch of green kids 18 and put them on machinery or working cattle and you will see the accident rate go up. How many are hurt playing football.

R hand nothing was mentioned about he kids previous experiences. The men I knew that were killed were farmers/farmworkers and had done so all their lives. I might add as to my rural up bringing the school system I attended dismissed school each year in the fall until all the cotton was picked and believe me I had rather been in school than the cotton field but I didn't have a choice. The money my brother and I made picking cotton was used to buy our fall school clothes. Is that rural enough for you.
 

Steve

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Supporters of the rules say that farming is dangerous and that new regulations are necessary to protect migrant children and others.

this is a case of another problem coming across our border..

our child labor laws have worked well as is for some time now..
 

Steve

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TSR said:
I might add as to my rural up bringing the school system I attended dismissed school each year in the fall until all the cotton was picked and believe me I had rather been in school than the cotton field but I didn't have a choice. The money my brother and I made picking cotton was used to buy our fall school clothes. Is that rural enough for you.

and looking back would you have rather not had the experience?
 

myersfarm

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Steve said:
TSR said:
I might add as to my rural up bringing the school system I attended dismissed school each year in the fall until all the cotton was picked and believe me I had rather been in school than the cotton field but I didn't have a choice. The money my brother and I made picking cotton was used to buy our fall school clothes. Is that rural enough for you.

and looking back would you have rather not had the experience?


and PICKING COTTON WAS BY HAND...i have the still sore back and scares on my fingers
 

Hay Feeder

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The USDA Sec sent out a newrelase that the changing of the agriculutre child youth labor laws (recomendations) were for hired labor only. That was reported this past week in Pork Today web page email blast.
Ranchers/ Farmers children were exempt
 

ranch hand

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Hay feeder... That means the neighbor kids can not help brand, ride or work cattle at the neighbors or if your outfit is a corporation. Lots of kids hire out for haying season to make money for school or as earlier trs stated for clothing.
 

Steve

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myersfarm said:
Steve said:
TSR said:
I might add as to my rural up bringing the school system I attended dismissed school each year in the fall until all the cotton was picked and believe me I had rather been in school than the cotton field but I didn't have a choice. The money my brother and I made picking cotton was used to buy our fall school clothes. Is that rural enough for you.

and looking back would you have rather not had the experience?


and PICKING COTTON WAS BY HAND...i have the still sore back and scares on my fingers

it might have given you sore hands, but it sure could build character and good work ethics..





one of my favorite passages.. (Romans 5)

Romans 5:3-4
 

Steve

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while every child should not be put in a dangerous situation and be properly trained..

eliminating farm work will never eliminate child hood accidents..

AUTO ACCIDENTS

The automobile accounts for the largest number of these accidental deaths.

Other top causes of accidental death are drowning, fire, falls, and poisoning,
db37_fig_2.gif


The third leading cause of death amongst teenagers: Suicide

while the death of even one child is hard to deal with..
It is estimated that 300 children younger than twenty years of age die of agricultural injuries on U.S. farms annually.

The death rate is four times that of all other industries combined. Farm vehicles account for half of the fatal farm injuries, the majority due to tractor accidents. Farmers also suffer from high levels of stress. Farm work is difficult and demanding, and poor prices, weather conditions, and unstable markets all contribute to the stress level.

Operating farm machinery, including vehicles, is the leading cause of farm deaths, and drowning is the second leading cause of death on farms.

do you ever notice how things get worded to make it seem like work is the cause?

in looking at the numbers half 300 are vehicle related and of that tractor accidents are the leading cause..

yet if you look past the misleading information..
About 44 percent of the injuries that occurred to children were classified as work-related.

no where in the article does it say work is the cause of the 300 annual deaths

vehicle accidents are top causes.. as well as drowning and suicide .

but actual farm work related accidents are only a portion of the total vehicle accidents..

while eliminating farm/ranch work might prevent that portion.. it would still leave 75% of the deaths not addressed..

and of those 25% we do not know what percentage is actually from work at other farms..

and again.. as I said, I do not take even one death lightly ..
but out of 300 annual deaths, using their numbers, slightly over 25% could be attributed to farm work.

so will this really prevent deaths? no.. it actually ignores and distorts the real problem.

it is a difficult subject and I would be all for preventing childhood or any accidental deaths.. but the reality is a little more attention to training, swimming lessons and suicide prevention would do more good.

none of which is addressed.

agricultural-related injuries occurred among children and adolescents under the age of twenty who lived on, worked on, or visited a farm operation


they take all farm/ranch and rural related injuries and deaths and try to use it as justification to further their agenda.. and while unfortunate few are actually farm/ranch work related.
 

Steve

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while it was a long time ago, when I first started working at a neighbors farm, I was required to take a two week farm safety course.


is it still "required" in South Dakota?











(I used the required in quotes because I doubt it was a state mandated requirement even then).
 

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