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Cost to Operate a Chevy Volt

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TexasBred

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Eric Bolling (Fox Business Channel's Follow the Money) test drove the
Chevy Volt at the invitation of General Motors.

For four days in a row, the fully charged battery lasted only 25 miles
before the Volt switched to the reserve gasoline engine.

Eric calculated the car got 30 mpg including the 25 miles it ran on the battery.

So, the range including the 9 gallon gas tank and the 16 kwh battery
is approximately 270 miles.

It will take you 4 1/2 hours to drive 270 miles at 60 mph. Then add 10
hours to charge the battery and you have a total trip time of 14.5
hours.

In a typical road trip your average speed (including charging time)
would be 20 mph.

According to General Motors, the Volt battery holds 16 kwh of electricity. It takes a full 10 hours to charge a drained battery.

The cost for the electricity to charge the Volt is never mentioned so I looked up what I pay for electricity.

I pay approximately (it varies with amount used and the seasons) $1.16 per kwh.

16 kwh x $1.16 per kwh = $18.56 to charge the battery.

$18.56 per charge divided by 25 miles = $0.74 per mile to operate the
Volt using the battery.

Compare this to a similar size car with a gasoline engine only that gets 32 mpg.

$3.19 per gallon divided by 32 mpg = $0.10 per mile.

The gasoline powered car costs about $15,000 while the Volt costs
$46,000.........

So the government wants us to pay 3 times as much, for a car that costs more than 7 times as much to run, and takes 3 times longer to drive across country..... REALLY ?????

More proof of Washington Mathematical Geniuses!!

Buy Government Motors.

It's the taxpayers Car Company.
 

Steve

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in a favorable article..

The Chevy Volt has a 16-kWh battery pack, but for reasons of durability, in actuality it exploits only a percentage of this. In fact, it uses 8 kWh in its 40 miles per day. Thus, my Volt adds around 240 kWh per month to my home electric bill.

I'm already into Tier 5 usage (these days, not an absurd assumption). Then all of the car's added 240 kWh comes at 31¢/kWh or an additional monthly cost of $74.40. Hence, its 1200 miles works out to 6.2¢/mile,


By contrast, a Toyota Prius's 48 mpg of traditional gasoline works out to around 6¢/mile.

he took favorable assumptions.. 40 mile range, no gas usage, and only charging to half the capacity.. and the car still sucked.

while Snopes called the e-mail false.. its own calculation came in at .11 cents per mile... which means.. it is still a fuel HOG

just cause a liberal can't see electricity doesn't mean it doesn't use fuel to generate it... :? :???: :shock:
 

hypocritexposer

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Unless I missed it, neither of these estimates takes into account the lower costs to the owner, due to the taxpayer picking up part of the tab, in the form of tax credits
 

TexasBred

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hypocritexposer said:
Unless I missed it, neither of these estimates takes into account the lower costs to the owner, due to the taxpayer picking up part of the tab, in the form of tax credits

What is the tax credit?? $10,000?? Off a car priced at $47000 I think it was. Still not a lot of money for a very small car. Do you get an extra tax credit if the electricity used to recharge the batteries comes from a wind farm??
 

hypocritexposer

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TexasBred said:
hypocritexposer said:
Unless I missed it, neither of these estimates takes into account the lower costs to the owner, due to the taxpayer picking up part of the tab, in the form of tax credits

What is the tax credit?? $10,000?? Off a car priced at $47000 I think it was. Still not a lot of money for a very small car. Do you get an extra tax credit if the electricity used to recharge the batteries comes from a wind farm??

Chevrolet is advertising them at $31,645, which includes the $7500 tax "savings", but I believe Chev is also getting an tax credit or stimulus funds, so tthat would need to be added in too, wouldn't it?

To do an accurate analysis of the "true cost" you would also need to take into account the subsidization of these prices by having the government buy 1000s of them at a discounted price and also offereing the tax credit to themselves.

Just throwing out some ideas.



an interesting article on the Dealers claiming the $7500 tax credit and then the new owner also claiming the tax credit, for a total of $15,000:



Are GM Dealerships Gaming Chevy Volt Tax Credit?

http://nlpc.org/stories/2011/04/25/taxpayer-rip-dealerships-taking-chevy-volt-tax-credit
 

Kato

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I was told that those batteries have a lifespan of about five years, and replacement is five thousand dollars. This was for a Prius, so I'm not sure if it applies to a Volt.

It's another calculation that needs to be done before buying any hybrid/electric car.
 

hypocritexposer

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Kato said:
I was told that those batteries have a lifespan of about five years, and replacement is five thousand dollars. This was for a Prius, so I'm not sure if it applies to a Volt.

It's another calculation that needs to be done before buying any hybrid/electric car.


I have heard the same about the Volt batteries Kato.

they are a "rich" man's car, which is subsidized by us, the middle class, and all this to combat the fallacy of global warming
 
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