• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Customers are prepared to pay for quality

Help Support Ranchers.net:

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Customers are prepared to pay for quality
15/11/2005 09:00:00
Farmers Weekly
Farmers in the UK have a fantastic market opportunity if only they can connect with their consumers, according to Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive of grocery sector body IGD.

Citing recent research from consultancy firm McKinsey, she told delegates at the Red Meat Industry Forum's annual conference that the UK had more premium shoppers than other EU countries.

Over 40% of British shoppers were prepared to pay top prices for quality food and premium convenience food, compared with just 36% in France and only 23% in Germany.

"These are not just older people, but younger ones too.

The challenge is to engage with these younger people who are keen but not confident or aware."

But most of them were not prepared to pay a premium just because food was locally produced, she said.

"Country of origin is not a key driver of purchase for food. But if you compete on freshness, taste, quality, appearance and health and develop marketing initiatives that promote seasonality, then the red meat industry won't just survive but thrive."

Richard Lowe of the Meat and Livestock Commission took issue with the comments, however, claiming that consumers do prefer to buy British meat.

He said MLC research in 2003 showed that 71% of shoppers preferred it.

But only two out of five people said they checked the label for provenance or origin information when shopping, and he admitted that even fewer would actually do so.

Mr Lowe laid the blame at retailers' doors, after research found that people were unable to identify country of origin information on almost half of a selection of meat packaging because it was hid or totally missing.

"In many respects, our food chain is letting down those 71% that want to know where their meat comes from."
 

Econ101

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
7,060
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
I am one of those 71%. Retailers used to let you cut fruit and take a sample before you buy. That doesn't happen any more. When you can not tell by looking, retailers may try to pull one over on you.

I have some friends in the northwest and they said that was what happened to the red delicious apple market. If you don't know about apples, they get grainy if not properly stored. You can not tell that they haven't been properly stored until you bite into it. Retailers were selling red delicious apples that were not stored properly probably because they got a deal on them. That is how retailers ruined the red delicious apple market for the producers.

People will pay for quality if sold correctly and you are consistent and competitors are not. Competition is good. It makes life better for all.
 

mrj

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Messages
4,530
Reaction score
1
Location
SD
Econ101 said:
I am one of those 71%. Retailers used to let you cut fruit and take a sample before you buy. That doesn't happen any more. When you can not tell by looking, retailers may try to pull one over on you.

I have some friends in the northwest and they said that was what happened to the red delicious apple market. If you don't know about apples, they get grainy if not properly stored. You can not tell that they haven't been properly stored until you bite into it. Retailers were selling red delicious apples that were not stored properly probably because they got a deal on them. That is how retailers ruined the red delicious apple market for the producers.

People will pay for quality if sold correctly and you are consistent and competitors are not. Competition is good. It makes life better for all.

Could be that part of the apple problem is that people like to try new products and several new varieties of apples with excellent flavor have been developed in recent years. The Red Delicious may be seen as overrated and past its day by some who like to keep up with modern trends. Just a thought, and I never did eat a Red Delicious that could compare favorably with some other varieties, both old and new. It simply isn't ALWAYS someone trying to rip a person off that is the reason for poor quality food, or any other item. The reasons can and do vary.

MRJ
 

Jason

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,994
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta Canada
I have eaten cooking apples that I prefer to red delicious.

Everyone has a taste preference. I guess that explains why Laura's lean has customers, and different customers prefer CAB.
 

S.S.A.P.

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
863
Reaction score
1
Location
Saskatchewan
Econ101 said:
I am one of those 71%. Retailers used to let you cut fruit and take a sample before you buy. That doesn't happen any more. When you can not tell by looking, retailers may try to pull one over on you.

I have some friends in the northwest and they said that was what happened to the red delicious apple market. If you don't know about apples, they get grainy if not properly stored. You can not tell that they haven't been properly stored until you bite into it. Retailers were selling red delicious apples that were not stored properly probably because they got a deal on them. That is how retailers ruined the red delicious apple market for the producers.
People will pay for quality if sold correctly and you are consistent and competitors are not. Competition is good. It makes life better for all.

Who stores the apples? Producers or a middleman? If the retailer purchased these apples after biting into them, it would seem there are two, possibly three ruining the market.
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
He said MLC research in 2003 showed that 71% of shoppers preferred it.

But only two out of five people said they checked the label for provenance or origin information when shopping, and he admitted that even fewer would actually do so.

Mr Lowe laid the blame at retailers' doors, after research found that people were unable to identify country of origin information on almost half of a selection of meat packaging because it was hid or totally missing.

"In many respects, our food chain is letting down those 71% that want to know where their meat comes from."

In our US case the J list should be PASSED on to the Consumer nomatter whether the case is Grocery or the Wholesale trade.
 

Econ101

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
7,060
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
Jason, I had a rome once that was almost as big as a small basket ball. Was that a granny smith you had?

The red delicious are real good if they are picked right after some real heavy frosts. Some of the sweetest and tastiest of all. I do happen to like the golden delicous too. All of the fuji and other foreign varieties are good too. Most of them show bad when a little older and that is why they are always fresh.

The point is that in the food chain, the cheapest isn't always the best. The way grocers and everyone down the line handles the food and takes care of it makes a huge difference in the taste and quality. When grocers cut corners on fresh food it shows. Paying a little more for a better quality and eating a little less is probably good for all of us.

Grocers who are willing to share all of the info. on the quality like Whole Foods are making those inroads into the market. I wouldn't buy everything from whole foods but they do have some good stuff. Grocers who want to hide the labels might want to work at Food for less.
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Grocers who are willing to share all of the info. on the quality like Whole Foods are making those inroads into the market. I wouldn't buy everything from whole foods but they do have some good stuff. Grocers who want to hide the labels might want to work at Food for less.

Whole Foods is a good place to shop but on some products a little pricey,although Sweet Bay (SEMI ORGANIC)has gone great guns after taking over Cash and CARRY
 

PPRM

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,960
Reaction score
8
Location
NE Oregon
I am from the Northwest. I see a lot of vertical integrationg in some of the apple industry, some of it isn't. The key is if they aren't eating Red Delicious, are they eating a different variety???? That could be a good thing, I like Johnathans myself, but that may be influenced by the Lady that first gave me one....Hmmmmmm...that was a few years ago, LOL,


PPRM
 

Econ101

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
7,060
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
S.S.A.P. said:
Econ101 said:
I am one of those 71%. Retailers used to let you cut fruit and take a sample before you buy. That doesn't happen any more. When you can not tell by looking, retailers may try to pull one over on you.

I have some friends in the northwest and they said that was what happened to the red delicious apple market. If you don't know about apples, they get grainy if not properly stored. You can not tell that they haven't been properly stored until you bite into it. Retailers were selling red delicious apples that were not stored properly probably because they got a deal on them. That is how retailers ruined the red delicious apple market for the producers.
People will pay for quality if sold correctly and you are consistent and competitors are not. Competition is good. It makes life better for all.

Who stores the apples? Producers or a middleman? If the retailer purchased these apples after biting into them, it would seem there are two, possibly three ruining the market.

Those apples should be stored in a ca (controlled atmosphere) unit where they pump out the oxygen until ready to be put on the shelves for purchasing. Many times they were not. You can't tell by looking at them that they were stored incorrectly. They look good enough to buy with out CA storage but they are not really good eating if left too long out of storage. Reduces sales when they are not good eating apples. If you are picking them out at the store usually the darkest red delicious are the best. I like the first ones that fall off a limb when you shake it gently after a good frost or light freeze. Quality products will bring back customers.
 

Econ101

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
7,060
Reaction score
0
Location
TX
PPRM said:
I am from the Northwest. I see a lot of vertical integrationg in some of the apple industry, some of it isn't. The key is if they aren't eating Red Delicious, are they eating a different variety???? That could be a good thing, I like Johnathans myself, but that may be influenced by the Lady that first gave me one....Hmmmmmm...that was a few years ago, LOL,


PPRM

Johnnys are good too. When in the orchards, my favorite was the golden delicous. Of course in the orchare you get how they are supposed to taste and it doesn't turn out that way often enough at the store. Little spoiled, I guess.
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
"Country of origin is not a key driver of purchase for food. But if you compete on freshness, taste, quality, appearance and health and develop marketing initiatives that promote seasonality, then the red meat industry won't just survive but thrive." ENOUGH SAID
 

Latest posts

Top