• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

CWD kills 25% of elk IN PENS CONTAMINATED CWD

Help Support Ranchers.net:

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

From: TSS
Subject: Wasting disease kills 25% of elk IN PENS CONTAMINATED WITH CWD 11 OF 43 IN FOUR YEARS
Date: February 16, 2006 at 10:20 am PST

DRAFT

WYOMING GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE MANAGEMENT PLAN

February 17, 2006


snip...


5. Predicted population effects on free-ranging elk based on captive elk chronically exposed to the CWD prion.
Forty-three female elk calves were trapped at the National Elk Refuge and transported to Sybille in February 2002. Elk were housed in pens, assumed to be environmentally contaminated with the CWD prion. Elk will be held throughout their lifetimes. Elk dying will be examined and cause of death determined. From these data, it will should be possible to model free-ranging elk mortality and population dynamics under extreme circumstances of CWD prion exposure and transmission. As of December 2005 (46 months post capture), 11 of 43 elk have died due to CWD. This compares to 100% mortality in less than 25 months in elk orally inoculated with different dosages of the CWD prion.


REVISED DRAFT

http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/CWD2005reviseddraft.pdftss


DRAFT

http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/CWD2005Plan8-19-05.pdftss


CWD WYOMING

In 2005, the Wyoming legislature appropriated $2 million from the general

fund to the department’s veterinary services program. An additional $500,000

was earmarked for sage grouse habitat improvement projects and sage grouse local

working group meetings and activities.

ast year, Game and Fish tested more than 3,822 elk and deer across the state

and found eighty-two animals infected with chronic wasting disease, a fatal

brain disease of deer, elk, and moose. The disease appeared in four new areas—

deer hunt areas 30 and 33 near Kaycee, deer hunt area 76 in the southeast Snowy

Range, and elk hunt area 125 near Elk Mountain.

In the fall of 2005, the Game and Fish Commission approved regulations

designed to reduce the chance of spreading CWD to other parts of the state. The

regulations prohibit transporting a deer or elk from affected areas to any other

hunt area in Wyoming unless the head and spinal column are removed. The regulation

does allow animals to be transported to private residences, meat processors,

or taxidermists, provided the head and all portions of the spinal column are left

at the kill site or disposed in an approved landfill.

Game and Fish is focusing on finding out where exactly the disease occurs in

the state, how it may be spreading, and aggressively dealing with cases found

in new areas. The department is also participating in and supporting applied

research projects aimed at understanding the prevalence of CWD in deer and elk.


http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/04-05_annual_report.pdftss


TSS

#################### https://lists.aegee.org/bse-l.html ####################
 

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
i guess rkaisers and kathy nuclear power plants caused this :lol: :lol: :lol:


like i said, in my opinion, the most disturbing factor is the real potential for CWD to cattle and the risk of cwdTSE to cattle. IF the transmission of CWD happens in the same way with cattle as to deer and elk, the chances of stopping the spread of this agent in the wild will become much more difficult. you have to consider, the USA has a most unique and dangerous situation, and that is it's multiple TSE in species, all of which have been rendered and fed back to animals for human/animal consumption. the long incubation is what is fooling everyone. hope i am wrong. ..... tss
 

rkaiser

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
1,958
Reaction score
0
Location
Calgary Alberta
Terry says
i guess rkaisers and kathy nuclear power plants caused this

Are you still trying to be my Valentine Terry? And all this time I thought Terry was a male.

I'll respond to you in a day or two ------ It's bulls sale time.
 

mrj

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Messages
4,609
Reaction score
1
Location
SD
reader (the Second) said:
Good succinct description of the danger. God I hope you are wrong.

The young deaths of CJD in men who likely hunted -- 26, 32 -- bother me and although I know the pathologists haven't yet seen clear indication of CWD crossing the species barrier, I know they are extremely worried. Passing to cows would really be terrible.

reader, What do you mean by "men who likely hunted"? That seems a strange 'identifier' to me.

MRJ
 

Kathy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
837
Reaction score
0
Location
Home on the Range, Alberta
Tom Thorne/Beth Williams Wildlife Research Center at Sybille
2362 Highway 34
Wheatland, Wyoming 82201
(307) 322-2571

This facility is closed to the public. It was named in honor of Dr. Elizabeth Williams (prominant CWD expert) and her husband Tom Thorne, Director of Fish and Wildlife in Wyoming. Both were killed in a winter car accident, near Xmas 2004.

Sorry Terry, but there is a connection between this hot zone of CWD and radiation. It has been known about since the early 1970s.

A quote from Purdey "Environmental Origins of TSEs", see the link:
http://www.purdeyenvironment.com/RadioactivesonicTSE.htm

"The atomic fawns"

But a series of well planned experiments had been designed and carried out back in the 1960s/ 1970s, where the US atomic energy agency and government had funded the Colorado department of wildlife and Colorado State Uni’s (CSU) Department of radiology and radiation biology at Fort Collins to monitor the exposure of deer to plutonium, strontium 90 and cesium 134 at every level. I recently stumbled upon these sinister studies whilst browsing through the vaults of PHD theses stored in the basement of the CSU library.

One of the trials involved transporting deer fawns back and forth between the deer pens at the Department’s Foothills facility at Fort Collins and the plutonium contaminated pastures of the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Factory at Boulder 60 kilometres away . The objective was to monitor the effects and eco-dynamics of leaked plutonium ( and its daughter radionuclides ) through the biosystem of the deer and within the general ecosystem.

A series of radioactive leaks from rusting barrels that stored plutonium contaminated oil at the Rocky Flats Plant ( combined with a fire ) had enabled plutonium and its daughter radionuclides to become airborn, contaminating a wide area of the Colorado section of the Front Range – an area that has become the CWD endemic area today. The peak of contamination was during the 1967-1969 seasons when the air sampler detected Plu as high as .35 pCi /M3. A program of environmental monitoring had picked up significant levels of plutonium as far a field as the Pawnee Butt plains NE of Fort Collins and Roxy Ann mountain. Disturbingly, the levels of plutonium were higher in the livers of the wild deer that roamed the Cache le Poudre canyon at .042 dpm/gm than in the deer that roamed near to Rocky Flats itself (.033 dpm/gm ).

This whole problem was probably exacerbated by the emissions from the kiln chimneys of the local cement factory at Lyons; where, according to a 16/12/92 report in the South West Sage by John Dougherty, the EPA’s Division of solid waste made an emergency response on cement kiln dust, stating that they had found radioactive plutonium and cesium in the kiln dust at Lyons, and at two other plants near to weapon’s factories in the USA. The Lyon’s contamination was presumed to be the result of utilising low level nuclear waste material from the nearby Rocky Flats Weapons plant as fuel for the cement kiln.

During the 60s/ 70s, it seems that the entire operation of the Fort Collins wildlife facility was geared towards a raft of radiation experiments - including the direct injection of strontium 90 and cesium 134 into the deer - in order to monitor the biological effects of these potentially lethal ‘cold war’ compounds.

But it seems that one of the major biological repercussions of these unique experiments was neither reported nor published until 13 years later, when a 1980 paper by Williams and Young reported on the first ever recorded case of TSE in a deer (eg CWD) in 1967. The delay before publication is mysterious, since most scientists would normally be tripping over themselves to get important novel discoveries into the academic press. Whilst the authors made no mention of possible causal factors, they merely stated that the TSE affected deer were resident at the Fort Collins facility – eg; in the very same deer pens that had been involved in these radioactive experiments. Putting two and two together, it is unlikely that the space/time correlation between these unique radioactive experiments and the emergence of a novel neurodegenerative disease is a mere coincidence.

TSS wrote:
5. Predicted population effects on free-ranging elk based on captive elk chronically exposed to the CWD prion.
Forty-three female elk calves were trapped at the National Elk Refuge and transported to Sybille in February 2002. Elk were housed in pens, assumed to be environmentally contaminated with the CWD prion. Elk will be held throughout their lifetimes. Elk dying will be examined and cause of death determined. From these data, it will should be possible to model free-ranging elk mortality and population dynamics under extreme circumstances of CWD prion exposure and transmission. As of December 2005 (46 months post capture), 11 of 43 elk have died due to CWD. This compares to 100% mortality in less than 25 months in elk orally inoculated with different dosages of the CWD prion.

This is all very interesting since the animals were probably exposed to environments contaminated with radio-active material, as mentioned in Mark Purdey's document quoted above. Fort Collins has been doing research on ionizing radiation and its damaging effects to DNA. Two of Elizabeth Williams last papers (published post humously) were on this very subject (ionizing radiation).

Experimental animals at Fort Collins, I believe that cattle were being referred to, have been fed CWD prions for the last eight and a half years (8.5 yrs) according to Dr. Michael Miller, of Fort Collins (statement made at the Feb 2/06 Prion Symposium which my hubby attended). None of these animals have developed the disease. They have continued to increase the amounts being fed to them, and still no disease. Dr. Danny Matthews, of the VLA in UK, was livid that they were continuing to feed these animals for such a long period. Matthews stated, "kill them at 3 years, and get on with it".

Dr. M. Miller also mentioned that cattle have been living in CWD exposed pens for years and they are all doing fine.

Another example of this is the following study where Dr. Daniel Gould worked with Miller, et al. on histological survey of cattle living in the hot zone of CWD:

J Vet Diagn Invest. 2003 May;15(3):274-7.

Survey of cattle in northeast Colorado for evidence of chronic wasting disease: geographical and high-risk targeted sample.

Gould DH, Voss JL, Miller MW, Bachand AM, Cummings BA, Frank AA.

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, USA.

A geographically targeted survey of potentially high-risk, adult cattle in chronic wasting disease (CWD)-endemic areas in Colorado was initiated to assess the possibility of the spread of CWD from deer to cattle under natural conditions. Surveyed cattle were sympatric with free-roaming deer in geographically defined areas where CWD occurs and where CWD prevalence has been estimated. To qualify for inclusion in the survey, cattle had to be at least 4 years old and had to have spent a minimum of 4 years in surveyed areas. Brains from culled cattle were examined microscopically and immunohistochemically for tissue alterations indicative of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Two hundred sixty-two brains were suitable for evaluation and were found to lack changes indicative of a TSE infection. Prion deposition was not demonstrable using a method involving formic acid and proteinase-K treatment before application of monoclonal antibody to bovine prion protein (F99/97.6.1). Some incidental neuropathologic changes unrelated to those of TSEs were detected. Findings from this study suggest that large-scale spread of CWD from deer to cattle under natural range conditions in CWD-endemic areas of northeast Colorado is unlikely.

PMID: 12735350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
(Note: the animals were at least 4 years of age. Since most cattle haven't shown visible symptoms of BSE until they are 6 years of age.)

Another interesting research paper by Dr. DH. Gould, was done in 1998, entitled "Polioencephalomalacia" it is free on line. Search thru "Entrez Pubmed".

J Anim Sci. 1998 Jan;76(1):309-14.

Polioencephalomalacia.

Gould DH.

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA.

Polioencephalomalacia (PEM) is a neuropathologic condition of ruminants that can be induced by a variety of neural metabolic disruptions. These include altered thiamine status, water deprivation-sodium ion toxicosis, lead poisoning, and high sulfur intake. Investigations of sulfur-related PEM have demonstrated that the onset of the clinical signs coincides with excessive ruminal sulfide production. A number of ruminal factors could modulate the production and absorption of ruminal sulfide. The development of a convenient method to estimate ruminal gas cap H2S has made it possible to identify cattle with high levels of ruminal H2S and evaluate their risk of developing PEM.

PMID: 9464912 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Within this paper, Gould mentions that respiration of hydrogen sulfide could "serve as a primary entry route" of sulfides into animals. "Cattle exposed to atmospheric manure gas (H2S) developed PEM (Dahme et al, 1983)"

He also noted, under "Studies of Experimental PEM in Colorado", that "PEM was stimulated by the occurrence of PEM in association with copper deficiency and high-sulfate waters in our region. During the course of the experiments on diet-induced copper deficiency in cattle, we observed that copper-deficient experimental diet with added sulfate consistently induced PEM in cattle."

Read Purdey's paper. Radio-active material is linked to this area.
 

Kathy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
837
Reaction score
0
Location
Home on the Range, Alberta
TSS, none of your links are working for me at this moment.

Where is the proof of 11 out of 43 animals developing CWD in "what penned area"?

assumed to be environmentally contaminated with the CWD prion.

ASS-U-MEd. These pens are contaminated with radio-active material. However, since the experts in control of the TSE science, have never ever "CHARACTERIZED" prions, we don't know what elements carry the radio-activity. Why is anything assumed? Test the soil, water, atmosphere and find the answers.

What is the content of the prion in relationship to phosphorous, sulfur, lead, copper, uranium (daughter decay products), nitrogen, carbon, iron, zinc, manganese, etc . Testing procedures exist to do this analysis of the elements making up prions - why do these scientists, like G. Telling of Kentucky and Danny Matthews of UK, state that it will be some time before this is done? It should have been the very first thing done.
 

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
kathy,

kathy writes;



> TSS, none of your links are working for me at this moment.


it's the plutonium kathy, i keep telling you, if you stop eating the plutonium, you could have figured that link out. i bet you glow in the dark ;-)




REVISED DRAFT





DRAFT

WYOMING GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE MANAGEMENT PLAN

February 17, 2006





http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/CWD2005reviseddraft.pdf





tss
 

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
correct urls.....sorry;


REVISED DRAFT


http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/CWD2005reviseddraft.pdf


DRAFT


http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/CWD2005Plan8-19-05.pdf



http://gf.state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/04-05_annual_report.pdf



tss
 

Kathy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
837
Reaction score
0
Location
Home on the Range, Alberta
Tom Thorne/Beth Williams Wildlife Research Center at Sybille
2362 Highway 34
Wheatland, Wyoming 82201
(307) 322-2571

This facility is closed to the public. It was named in honor of Dr. Elizabeth Williams (prominant CWD expert) and her husband Tom Thorne, Director of Fish and Wildlife in Wyoming. Both were killed in a winter car accident, near Xmas 2004.

Sorry Terry, but there is a connection between this hot zone of CWD and radiation. It has been known about since the early 1970s.

A quote from Purdey "Environmental Origins of TSEs", see the link:
http://www.purdeyenvironment.com/RadioactivesonicTSE.htm

Quote:
"The atomic fawns"

But a series of well planned experiments had been designed and carried out back in the 1960s/ 1970s, where the US atomic energy agency and government had funded the Colorado department of wildlife and Colorado State Uni’s (CSU) Department of radiology and radiation biology at Fort Collins to monitor the exposure of deer to plutonium, strontium 90 and cesium 134 at every level. I recently stumbled upon these sinister studies whilst browsing through the vaults of PHD theses stored in the basement of the CSU library.

One of the trials involved transporting deer fawns back and forth between the deer pens at the Department’s Foothills facility at Fort Collins and the plutonium contaminated pastures of the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Factory at Boulder 60 kilometres away . The objective was to monitor the effects and eco-dynamics of leaked plutonium ( and its daughter radionuclides ) through the biosystem of the deer and within the general ecosystem.

A series of radioactive leaks from rusting barrels that stored plutonium contaminated oil at the Rocky Flats Plant ( combined with a fire ) had enabled plutonium and its daughter radionuclides to become airborn, contaminating a wide area of the Colorado section of the Front Range – an area that has become the CWD endemic area today. The peak of contamination was during the 1967-1969 seasons when the air sampler detected Plu as high as .35 pCi /M3. A program of environmental monitoring had picked up significant levels of plutonium as far a field as the Pawnee Butt plains NE of Fort Collins and Roxy Ann mountain. Disturbingly, the levels of plutonium were higher in the livers of the wild deer that roamed the Cache le Poudre canyon at .042 dpm/gm than in the deer that roamed near to Rocky Flats itself (.033 dpm/gm ).

This whole problem was probably exacerbated by the emissions from the kiln chimneys of the local cement factory at Lyons; where, according to a 16/12/92 report in the South West Sage by John Dougherty, the EPA’s Division of solid waste made an emergency response on cement kiln dust, stating that they had found radioactive plutonium and cesium in the kiln dust at Lyons, and at two other plants near to weapon’s factories in the USA. The Lyon’s contamination was presumed to be the result of utilising low level nuclear waste material from the nearby Rocky Flats Weapons plant as fuel for the cement kiln.

During the 60s/ 70s, it seems that the entire operation of the Fort Collins wildlife facility was geared towards a raft of radiation experiments - including the direct injection of strontium 90 and cesium 134 into the deer - in order to monitor the biological effects of these potentially lethal ‘cold war’ compounds.

But it seems that one of the major biological repercussions of these unique experiments was neither reported nor published until 13 years later, when a 1980 paper by Williams and Young reported on the first ever recorded case of TSE in a deer (eg CWD) in 1967. The delay before publication is mysterious, since most scientists would normally be tripping over themselves to get important novel discoveries into the academic press. Whilst the authors made no mention of possible causal factors, they merely stated that the TSE affected deer were resident at the Fort Collins facility – eg; in the very same deer pens that had been involved in these radioactive experiments. Putting two and two together, it is unlikely that the space/time correlation between these unique radioactive experiments and the emergence of a novel neurodegenerative disease is a mere coincidence.

TSS wrote:
Quote:
5. Predicted population effects on free-ranging elk based on captive elk chronically exposed to the CWD prion.
Forty-three female elk calves were trapped at the National Elk Refuge and transported to Sybille in February 2002. Elk were housed in pens, assumed to be environmentally contaminated with the CWD prion. Elk will be held throughout their lifetimes. Elk dying will be examined and cause of death determined. From these data, it will should be possible to model free-ranging elk mortality and population dynamics under extreme circumstances of CWD prion exposure and transmission. As of December 2005 (46 months post capture), 11 of 43 elk have died due to CWD. This compares to 100% mortality in less than 25 months in elk orally inoculated with different dosages of the CWD prion.


This is all very interesting since the animals were probably exposed to environments contaminated with radio-active material, as mentioned in Mark Purdey's document quoted above. Fort Collins has been doing research on ionizing radiation and its damaging effects to DNA. Two of Elizabeth Williams last papers (published post humously) were on this very subject (ionizing radiation).

Experimental animals at Fort Collins, I believe that cattle were being referred to, have been fed CWD prions for the last eight and a half years (8.5 yrs) according to Dr. Michael Miller, of Fort Collins (statement made at the Feb 2/06 Prion Symposium which my hubby attended). None of these animals have developed the disease. They have continued to increase the amounts being fed to them, and still no disease. Dr. Danny Matthews, of the VLA in UK, was livid that they were continuing to feed these animals for such a long period. Matthews stated, "kill them at 3 years, and get on with it".

Dr. M. Miller also mentioned that cattle have been living in CWD exposed pens for years and they are all doing fine.

Another example of this is the following study where Dr. Daniel Gould worked with Miller, et al. on histological survey of cattle living in the hot zone of CWD:

Quote:
J Vet Diagn Invest. 2003 May;15(3):274-7.

Survey of cattle in northeast Colorado for evidence of chronic wasting disease: geographical and high-risk targeted sample.

Gould DH, Voss JL, Miller MW, Bachand AM, Cummings BA, Frank AA.

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, USA.

A geographically targeted survey of potentially high-risk, adult cattle in chronic wasting disease (CWD)-endemic areas in Colorado was initiated to assess the possibility of the spread of CWD from deer to cattle under natural conditions. Surveyed cattle were sympatric with free-roaming deer in geographically defined areas where CWD occurs and where CWD prevalence has been estimated. To qualify for inclusion in the survey, cattle had to be at least 4 years old and had to have spent a minimum of 4 years in surveyed areas. Brains from culled cattle were examined microscopically and immunohistochemically for tissue alterations indicative of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Two hundred sixty-two brains were suitable for evaluation and were found to lack changes indicative of a TSE infection. Prion deposition was not demonstrable using a method involving formic acid and proteinase-K treatment before application of monoclonal antibody to bovine prion protein (F99/97.6.1). Some incidental neuropathologic changes unrelated to those of TSEs were detected. Findings from this study suggest that large-scale spread of CWD from deer to cattle under natural range conditions in CWD-endemic areas of northeast Colorado is unlikely.

PMID: 12735350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

(Note: the animals were at least 4 years of age. Since most cattle haven't shown visible symptoms of BSE until they are 6 years of age.)

Another interesting research paper by Dr. DH. Gould, was done in 1998, entitled "Polioencephalomalacia" it is free on line. Search thru "Entrez Pubmed".

Quote:
J Anim Sci. 1998 Jan;76(1):309-14.

Polioencephalomalacia.

Gould DH.

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA.

Polioencephalomalacia (PEM) is a neuropathologic condition of ruminants that can be induced by a variety of neural metabolic disruptions. These include altered thiamine status, water deprivation-sodium ion toxicosis, lead poisoning, and high sulfur intake. Investigations of sulfur-related PEM have demonstrated that the onset of the clinical signs coincides with excessive ruminal sulfide production. A number of ruminal factors could modulate the production and absorption of ruminal sulfide. The development of a convenient method to estimate ruminal gas cap H2S has made it possible to identify cattle with high levels of ruminal H2S and evaluate their risk of developing PEM.

PMID: 9464912 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Within this paper, Gould mentions that respiration of hydrogen sulfide could "serve as a primary entry route" of sulfides into animals. "Cattle exposed to atmospheric manure gas (H2S) developed PEM (Dahme et al, 1983)"

He also noted, under "Studies of Experimental PEM in Colorado", that "PEM was stimulated by the occurrence of PEM in association with copper deficiency and high-sulfate waters in our region. During the course of the experiments on diet-induced copper deficiency in cattle, we observed that copper-deficient experimental diet with added sulfate consistently induced PEM in cattle."

The links are working for me now, Terry. I hope that you will allow me this repeat of my earlier posting. I am not so certain that you read it.

For someone who gets so upset about the issue, I don't know why you think your plutonium comments are funny. Let people read what Purdey wrote regarding CWD at Fort Collins, and how they (Fort Collins) have been, and continue to, monitor the effects of radiation on the animals inhabiting these contaminated lands.
http://www.purdeyenvironment.com/RadioactivesonicTSE.htm
 

flounder

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
2,631
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS
> This compares to 100% mortality in less than 25 months in elk orally

> inoculated with different dosages of the CWD prion.



indeed kathy, the oral route of cwd is a most disturbing route when you see the feed that was fed to these deer and elk over the years.


ruminant protein with TSE... tss
 

Latest posts

Top