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Dis are you happy now?????

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Steve

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How come he isn't being pressured to resign?

Quite simply he has not been "convicted" of any crime....

It is innocent until proven guilty in our country....

liberals often bring that up when defending Democrat's crimes, (or convicted murderers being held after spending a year in a Al-Qiada training camp..,,,,, then forget about it when it is a Republican leader.....

But if you would like to have a say in his career you would have to move to Texas.

By the way why hasn't Kennedy resigned? Didn't his crime merit more outrage?
 

Disagreeable

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Steve said:
How come he isn't being pressured to resign?

Quite simply he has not been "convicted" of any crime....

It is innocent until proven guilty in our country....

ROTFLMAO! George W. Bush has held at least one American citizens without charges or an attorney for going on three years now. So it's innocent until proven guilty, unless the Bush Bunch thinks otherwise.

liberals often bring that up when defending Democrat's crimes, (or convicted murderers being held after spending a year in a Al-Qiada training camp..,,,,, then forget about it when it is a Republican leader.....

But if you would like to have a say in his career you would have to move to Texas.

DeLay has resigned because the Republican party is in deep do do and so is he. He's going to trial in Texas and the Abramoff investigation is just getting started. He's going to have his hands full. He also has several announced challengers for his House seat.

By the way why hasn't Kennedy resigned? Didn't his crime merit more outrage?

Kennedy was never tried for anything. The voters in his district have elected him over and over, so I guess there wasn't a lot of outrage where it counted. Now if you want to move to his district and vote against him, you are free to do that.
 

Disagreeable

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MsSage said:
Texas Rep. Tom DeLay to Give Up Post as House Majority Leader

I'm generally a happy person. This is only the start. But here's some interesting reading:

"Standing before a crowd of applauding House Republicans in the Capitol Hill Club last March, then-Majority Leader Tom DeLay (Tex.) inscribed $1.8 million on a giant check and signed his name at the bottom with the flourish of a game show host. The tally, representing funds to be given to the campaigns of 10 Republican lawmakers, was yet another cache collected by one of the premier money machines ever to function on Capitol Hill.

It worked simply. On one side of the machine, a hose vacuumed the pockets of large corporations, wealthy individuals and legions of lobbyists on K Street, all instructed by DeLay to contribute only to Republicans. Out the other side, at some later date, came legislation of interest to many of the donors. Inside the machine, twisting its knobs and pulling its levers, was DeLay -- who was unabashed about his pay-to-play philosophy and relentless in enforcing his political rules."

"But DeLay's leadership was undermined over time by a blurring of ethical lines in the handling of money by his aides and advisers, his taste for the lifestyle of the super-rich, and his take-no-prisoners approach to political disputes in a town built on compromise. A lawmaker who cast himself as an icon of moral conservatism, DeLay came increasingly to be regarded as a symbol of special-interest lawmaking. With an election looming in 11 months, his colleagues began to fear the consequences."

"Walker later decried what he considered the excessive influence of fundraising committees such as DeLay's Americans for a Republican Majority Political Action Committee (ARMPAC), which, he said, caused the outcome to be determined by money, not talent. But his colleagues largely shrugged their shoulders. Over the next decade, they accepted nearly $4.5 million in contributions from ARMPAC, which drew its funds heavily from tobacco, energy, railroad and communications interests."

Excerpts; there's more at the link: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10755760/
 

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