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Gibson Guitars Under Attack By Obama

Mike

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All this caused by "right to work" & Union issues?

Gibson Guitar CEO: We're Under Attack By Obama Administration

CEO says Obama Justice Dept. Wants Them to Close Their Doors.

by Jim Hoft

08/27/2011

Henry Juszkiewicz, the CEO of Gibson Guitars, Inc. was on The Dana Loesch Show on Friday. Gibson is under attack by the the Obama Justice Department for accusations that the company broke American Indian laws.

Juszkiewiz said the government suggested that the company's use of unfinished wood from India is illegal, not because of U.S. law, but because of the Justice Department's interpretation of a law in India. The Holder Justice Department raided at least two Gibson manufacturing plants this week forcing hundreds of workers off their jobs. Juszkiewiz says the company lost a million dollars this week.

Finally, Henry Juszkiewicz told Dana, "The Obama Justice Department wants us to just shut our doors and go away." He says he will continue to fight for the Gibson company and its workers.

Juszkiewicz held a press conference yesterday in front of the Gibson headquarters. The Obama Justice Department confiscated over $500,000 in materials back in 2009. Gibson is going to court on Monday to discuss a previous request for the government to return the property.

More... Gibson Guitar CEO: "We're Being Targeted."

Still More... Tom W. added this:

Gibson is the only guitar company targeted by the Obama DOJ under the Lacey Act. Tennessee is a right-to-work state. Fender, Taylor, Rickenbacker, Danelectro, Carvin, MusicMan, and ESP are in California; Spector is in New York; Martin is in Pennsylvania; Guild, Ovation, and Hamer are in Connecticut; Alvarez is in Missouri; B.C. Rich is in Kentucky; Heritage is in Michigan; Washburn is in Illinois. All are forced-union states.

Peavey is another guitar and electronics company, located in the right-to-work state of Mississippi. Since 2009, Peavey has been the target of multiple lawsuits filed by a competitor, MUSIC Group, which alleges that Peavy products fail to meet federal safety and emissions standards.
 

andybob

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I don't know about unions, more likely ignorance! From what I have read to date, the wood comes from Madagascar, an independent African country situated in the Indian ocean, but totally African geographically and population wise, so India has no durisdiction over any resources sourced from there.
 

Tex

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andybob said:
I don't know about unions, more likely ignorance! From what I have read to date, the wood comes from Madagascar, an independent African country situated in the Indian ocean, but totally African geographically and population wise, so India has no durisdiction over any resources sourced from there.

Clearly we don't have enough to go on here and there is a a little bit of reporter conjecture floating around as your analysis of some of the more obvious mistakes show this to be the case.

We won't know until there are statements coming from the government.

It is concerning that the last raid did not have these statements, or are reported to not have them. We don't know because of lack of quality reporting and have only Gibson's take on it.



Tex
 

hopalong

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Tex said:
andybob said:
I don't know about unions, more likely ignorance! From what I have read to date, the wood comes from Madagascar, an independent African country situated in the Indian ocean, but totally African geographically and population wise, so India has no durisdiction over any resources sourced from there.

Clearly we don't have enough to go on here and there is a a little bit of reporter conjecture floating around as your analysis of some of the more obvious mistakes show this to be the case.

We won't know until there are statements coming from the government.

It is concerning that the last raid did not have these statements, or are reported to not have them. We don't know because of lack of quality reporting and have only Gibson's take on it.



Tex



Yea statements from the government is a sure thing that the truth will be told, especially from this administration,
 

Tex

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hopalong said:
Tex said:
andybob said:
I don't know about unions, more likely ignorance! From what I have read to date, the wood comes from Madagascar, an independent African country situated in the Indian ocean, but totally African geographically and population wise, so India has no durisdiction over any resources sourced from there.

Clearly we don't have enough to go on here and there is a a little bit of reporter conjecture floating around as your analysis of some of the more obvious mistakes show this to be the case.

We won't know until there are statements coming from the government.

It is concerning that the last raid did not have these statements, or are reported to not have them. We don't know because of lack of quality reporting and have only Gibson's take on it.



Tex



Yea statements from the government is a sure thing that the truth will be told, especially from this administration,


hopalong, the question here is the motive which has only been speculated upon by a reporter. The government statement to look for is about that motive. The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

If you don't want to believe anything or take in any of the information and just go off of pure speculation that the writer asserts with no foundation, then go ahead. There is a segment of the population that operates this way. Again, it points out what Keynes said.

Tex
 

Steve

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Tex said:
We won't know until there are statements coming from the government.

for some reason.. this statement shows how dependent some folks have become.. and how scarey that is...

Do you really trust the government that much?
 

Steve

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The wood the Government seized on August 24 is from a Forest Stewardship Council certified supplier and is FSC Controlled, meaning that the wood complies with the standards of the Forest Stewardship Council, which is an industry-recognized and independent, not-for-profit organization established to promote responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC Controlled Wood standards require, among other things, that the wood not be illegally harvested and not be harvested in violation of traditional and civil rights.

The Federal Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. has suggested that the use of wood from India that is not finished by Indian workers is illegal, not because of U.S. law, but because it is the Justice Department’s interpretation of a law in India. (If the same wood from the same tree was finished by Indian workers, the material would be legal.)

so it is not about a product,.. but about protectionist policies of another country..

I do not support strict protectionism here.. let alone US protecting another countries misguided policies.. by putting our workers out of work..

According to the court documents online, the government first started investigating the company for wood taken from Madagascar, and that's where the wood and guitars seized in 2009 came from. In a 2009 search warrant affidavit,

so is India oppressing and imposing it's will on another country?

"Gibson has obtained sworn statements and documents from the Madagascar government and these materials, which have been filed in federal court, show that the wood seized in 2009 was legally exported under Madagascar law and that no law has been violated,"

this investigation isn't about importing a rare endangered wood, but about protecting jobs ...

so in effect if one does research one could easily conclude that if the wood had passed through Indian. and been made into slats, boards or sheets it would not be a legacy law violation..

in fact any processing in India would have made this a mute case,..

why must a rare wood go through a country with a dismal record on workers rights, environmental protections just to be legal in the US?
 

Steve

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The government statement to look for is about that motive. The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

sure they do.. so what is the motive in this case?

sell more chinese boxes?

IN 2000 four Americans were charged with importing lobster tails in plastic bags rather than cardboard boxes, in violation of a Honduran regulation that Honduras no longer enforces. They had fallen foul of the Lacey Act, which bars Americans from breaking foreign rules

The original intent was to prevent Americans from, say, poaching elephants in Kenya. But it has been interpreted to mean that they must abide by every footling wildlife regulation on Earth. The lobstermen had no idea they were breaking the law. Yet three of them got eight years apiece. Two are still in jail.

a little research shows that this is a perversion of justice...

Diane Huang, a small business owner from New Jersey, is scheduled to enter federal prison on July 21, where she will begin serving a two-year sentence for purchasing undersized lobster tails shipped in clear plastic bags.

Under the Lacey Act, a U.S. law, it is illegal to take wildlife in violation of foreign law. The lobsters Ms. Huang purchased violated obscure laws of Honduras because they were shipped in clear plastic bags, rather than opaque cardboard boxes, and a small percentage of the lobsters did not measure to 5.5 inches in length.

In 1999, Huang was charged with a felony count of conspiracy to smuggle (Huang was in the supply chain, having purchased the "unlawful" lobster tails). However, the Honduran laws, which served as the basis for the U.S. government's case against Ms. Huang, are no longer valid – a fact the government of Honduras pointed out when it filed an amicus brief with both the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. Huang's conviction along with those of three others, were upheld in March 2003.

She remains hopeful that small-business owners will continue to work together to bring about changes in the legal system that foster a climate for businesses to succeed, without leaving them vulnerable to manipulative and overzealous prosecutors.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/rightsandfreedoms/a/alobsterstail.htm

http://www.iamnotguilty.org/story.htm.

just another well meaning, bad liberal law....
 

Mike

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The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

Not necessarily so. Recently their was a truckdriver stopped in Montgomery with a large amount of cash in the cab of the truck. They did not arrest the driver, let him go but kept his cash. No reason given.

There was another instance not long ago where a used car dealer was going to an auto auction in Louisiana with $50,000.00 in cash to purchase some used vehicles. They stopped him and took his cash and let him go. Again, no reason given.

The gov't can pretty much do what they want, they have the LAW on their side. Pun intended.
 

Tex

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Mike said:
The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

Not necessarily so. Recently their was a truckdriver stopped in Montgomery with a large amount of cash in the cab of the truck. They did not arrest the driver, let him go but kept his cash. No reason given.

There was another instance not long ago where a used car dealer was going to an auto auction in Louisiana with $50,000.00 in cash to purchase some used vehicles. They stopped him and took his cash and let him go. Again, no reason given.

The gov't can pretty much do what they want, they have the LAW on their side. Pun intended.

This is a real concern to me, Mike. Not only the confiscation, but the lack of accountability for it after confiscated.

Any forfeiture of property, from these people in the vehicles or from Gibson must be adjudicated. Without this step, we are showing ourselves as a banana republic.

Tex
 

hopalong

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Tex said:
Mike said:
The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

Not necessarily so. Recently their was a truckdriver stopped in Montgomery with a large amount of cash in the cab of the truck. They did not arrest the driver, let him go but kept his cash. No reason given.

There was another instance not long ago where a used car dealer was going to an auto auction in Louisiana with $50,000.00 in cash to purchase some used vehicles. They stopped him and took his cash and let him go. Again, no reason given.

The gov't can pretty much do what they want, they have the LAW on their side. Pun intended.

This is a real concern to me, Mike. Not only the confiscation, but the lack of accountability for it after confiscated.

Any forfeiture of property, from these people in the vehicles or from Gibson must be adjudicated. Without this step, we are showing ourselves as a banana republic.

Tex

Yet you condone the government taking the property with out just cause???????????????????????????
 

Steve

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Tex said:
This is a real concern to me, Mike. Not only the confiscation, but the lack of accountability for it after confiscated.

Any forfeiture of property, from these people in the vehicles or from Gibson must be adjudicated. Without this step, we are showing ourselves as a banana republic.

Tex

don't be to concerned, we should politely wait for the government to explain it to US.

I am sure the overzealous prosecutors know there is some underlying crime.. they just have to figure out what the crime is first.. :shock:

they could use the legacy act.. the truck had a part made in china from Zimbabwe ore that wasn't processed in India. .so the money is part of the crime.. and they need to go back and get the truck as well...


and the motive.. well like most motives.. greed.. the government needs the money.. and they found a way to take it.. the legacy act... ain't greed wonderful... even the government can use it as a motive..
 

Tex

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hopalong said:
Tex said:
Mike said:
Not necessarily so. Recently their was a truckdriver stopped in Montgomery with a large amount of cash in the cab of the truck. They did not arrest the driver, let him go but kept his cash. No reason given.

There was another instance not long ago where a used car dealer was going to an auto auction in Louisiana with $50,000.00 in cash to purchase some used vehicles. They stopped him and took his cash and let him go. Again, no reason given.

The gov't can pretty much do what they want, they have the LAW on their side. Pun intended.

This is a real concern to me, Mike. Not only the confiscation, but the lack of accountability for it after confiscated.

Any forfeiture of property, from these people in the vehicles or from Gibson must be adjudicated. Without this step, we are showing ourselves as a banana republic.

Tex

Yet you condone the government taking the property with out just cause???????????????????????????

No, I just said I didn't. Is it opposite day where you live?

Tex
 

Tex

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Steve said:
Tex said:
This is a real concern to me, Mike. Not only the confiscation, but the lack of accountability for it after confiscated.

Any forfeiture of property, from these people in the vehicles or from Gibson must be adjudicated. Without this step, we are showing ourselves as a banana republic.

Tex

don't be to concerned, we should politely wait for the government to explain it to US.

I am sure the overzealous prosecutors know there is some underlying crime.. they just have to figure out what the crime is first.. :shock:

they could use the legacy act.. the truck had a part made in china from Zimbabwe ore that wasn't processed in India. .so the money is part of the crime.. and they need to go back and get the truck as well...


and the motive.. well like most motives.. greed.. the government needs the money.. and they found a way to take it.. the legacy act... ain't greed wonderful... even the government can use it as a motive..


The article quoted couldn't tell the difference between India and Madagascar so who knows what else they got wrong?

If charged with something, you do have to read or know what you are charged with or you could be talking Madagascar while they are talking Indian.

No, it seems, with your logic, that the government wants to make guitars.

Some of these articles and internet BS just isn't worth defending because it is all made up.


Tex
 

Tex

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Steve said:
The government statement to look for is about that motive. The govt. has to have a reason to raid you and take your stuff.

sure they do.. so what is the motive in this case?

sell more chinese boxes?

IN 2000 four Americans were charged with importing lobster tails in plastic bags rather than cardboard boxes, in violation of a Honduran regulation that Honduras no longer enforces. They had fallen foul of the Lacey Act, which bars Americans from breaking foreign rules

The original intent was to prevent Americans from, say, poaching elephants in Kenya. But it has been interpreted to mean that they must abide by every footling wildlife regulation on Earth. The lobstermen had no idea they were breaking the law. Yet three of them got eight years apiece. Two are still in jail.

a little research shows that this is a perversion of justice...

Diane Huang, a small business owner from New Jersey, is scheduled to enter federal prison on July 21, where she will begin serving a two-year sentence for purchasing undersized lobster tails shipped in clear plastic bags.

Under the Lacey Act, a U.S. law, it is illegal to take wildlife in violation of foreign law. The lobsters Ms. Huang purchased violated obscure laws of Honduras because they were shipped in clear plastic bags, rather than opaque cardboard boxes, and a small percentage of the lobsters did not measure to 5.5 inches in length.

In 1999, Huang was charged with a felony count of conspiracy to smuggle (Huang was in the supply chain, having purchased the "unlawful" lobster tails). However, the Honduran laws, which served as the basis for the U.S. government's case against Ms. Huang, are no longer valid – a fact the government of Honduras pointed out when it filed an amicus brief with both the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. Huang's conviction along with those of three others, were upheld in March 2003.

She remains hopeful that small-business owners will continue to work together to bring about changes in the legal system that foster a climate for businesses to succeed, without leaving them vulnerable to manipulative and overzealous prosecutors.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/rightsandfreedoms/a/alobsterstail.htm

http://www.iamnotguilty.org/story.htm.

just another well meaning, bad liberal law....

Steve, this sounds like a total waste of taxpayer money and a judicial system that is out of control. I guess this person was meant to Hang.

No, seriously, this is a waste of resources. Who ever is prosecuting these cases and wasting valuable resources on cases like this along with the federal judges who are rubber stamping them need to be removed from office unless there is a whole lot more to it than this. It seems that a fine would be more appropriate unless the continuance and scale is much larger than noted in the quote you gave. It would have been nice to see the complaint in its entirety.


Tex
 

Steve

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No, it seems, with your logic, that the government wants to make guitars.

in many cases the confiscated items are sold,



so like the hard to get ebony, the confiscated wood when it is sold.. will bring in much needed revenue..

:?
 

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Tex

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hypocritexposer said:
Steve said:
No, it seems, with your logic, that the government wants to make guitars.

in many cases the confiscated items are sold,



so like the hard to get ebony, the confiscated wood when it is sold.. will bring in much needed revenue..

:?

obama needed firewood for the WH, so he sent Holder out to get some.

There's the motive


Link: Bob Seger used a Gibson guitar, shakedown, you're busted

Oh, so are you saying the democrats need more parts to make their koob ba ya instruments or are they too lazy to do it and sold the confiscated and illegal wood to have the money to buy some?

Maybe they should be subject to the Lacey enforcement, if your theory is correct or they should forget it all and sing a cappella.

Tex
 

Mike

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Tonight, in an interview on KMJ’s “The Chris Daniel Show,” Gibson CEO Henry Juszkiewicz confirmed that the US government wanted Gibson guitars to use foreign labor over American labor.

CHRIS DANIEL: Mr. Juszkiewicz, did an agent of the US government suggest to you that your problems would go away if you used Madagascar labor instead of American labor?

HENRY JUSZKIEWICZ: They actually wrote that in a .

CHRIS DANIEL: Excuse me?

HENRY JUSKIEWICZ: They actually wrote that it a pleading.

CHRIS DANIEL: That your problems would go away if you used Madagascar labor instead of our labor?

HENRY JUSKIEWICZ: Yes
 

Tex

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Mike said:
Tonight, in an interview on KMJ’s “The Chris Daniel Show,” Gibson CEO Henry Juszkiewicz confirmed that the US government wanted Gibson guitars to use foreign labor over American labor.

CHRIS DANIEL: Mr. Juszkiewicz, did an agent of the US government suggest to you that your problems would go away if you used Madagascar labor instead of American labor?

HENRY JUSZKIEWICZ: They actually wrote that in a .

CHRIS DANIEL: Excuse me?

HENRY JUSKIEWICZ: They actually wrote that it a pleading.

CHRIS DANIEL: That your problems would go away if you used Madagascar labor instead of our labor?

HENRY JUSKIEWICZ: Yes

So there WAS a complaint? I would sure like to read it Mr. Juszkiewicz. Post it on the internet if you will.

I did hear a little bit on the radio from Martin guitars on the issue. I didn't catch enough of it to know any more than I knew before.

Tex
 

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