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Good News for South Dakotans!!!!!!!

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Mike

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Posted on Wed, Jan. 25, 2006
Horses and bikes may not be vehicles for long
JENNY MICHAEL
Associated Press

PIERRE, S.D. - Intoxicated South Dakotans should be able to ride horses or bikes home from bars without fear of being arrested for drunken driving, legislators decided Wednesday.

The House Transportation Committee voted 10-1 for a bill to exempt horses and bikes from the statutory definition of vehicles, sending HB1190 to the House floor.

Rep. Tom Hennies, R-Rapid City, said people who have been drinking and choose not to drive cars or trucks should not be punished for using alternate transportation.

"We should not push people to stop driving when they've been drinking, and at the same time penalize them if they get on a bicycle when they're drunk," the former police chief said.

Hennies told of a Pennington County man who was arrested several times for drunken driving, including a fourth arrest while pedaling a bicycle home one night. The man could have been sent to prison if he had been convicted, Hennies said.

"I don't know anybody that had that intent when we're talking about drunk drivers," he said.

A Pierre man was arrested several times in recent years for being drunk on his horse. At one trial, the man said he was upset for getting stopped because he had not been drinking and smelled of alcohol only because he had put liniment on his horse, adding that he wasn't a danger because his horse "knew the way home." He was found innocent that time.

Hennies acknowledged that drunks on bikes and horses can cause problems, but he said it would be better to charge them with disorderly conduct than drunken driving.

The bill would affect more than just drunken driving, Hennies said. He said people on horses and bikes would technically be excluded from other state traffic regulations, such as obeying stop signs, although most city ordinances would still require it.

"You won't have to buy a license plate for your horse, either," Hennies added.

Rep. Gordon Peterson, R-Wall, wondered if the bill signified the official end of the horse and buggy era in South Dakota.

"Cowboys that get drunk on Saturday nights and ride home in small towns won't like this too much," he said. "They won't have their fun with their cops."
 

Liberty Belle

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Looks like it's going to pass. All you drunks need to get roll bars installed on your saddles to prevent personal injury if involved in an accident while under the influence. And I can't wait to see the local town drunk riding his tricycle home when the bar closes....

State of South Dakota
EIGHTY-FIRST SESSION
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, 2006

583M0582 HOUSE BILL NO. 1190

Introduced by: Representatives Hennies, Cutler, Elliott, Frost, Gassman, Hanks, Jerke, Krebs, Kroger, Lange, McLaughlin, Murschel, Novstrup, O'Brien, Rave, Rhoden, Rounds, Sigdestad, and Van Etten and Senators Abdallah, Bartling, Broderick, Duniphan, Earley, Gray, Hansen (Tom), Kelly, Kloucek, Knudson, Koetzle, McCracken, Nesselhuf, Olson (Ed), and Sutton (Dan)





FOR AN ACT ENTITLED, An Act to specifically exclude ridden animals and bicycles from the definition of vehicles.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA:
Section 1. That subdivision (39) of § 32-14-1 be amended to read as follows:

(39) "Vehicle," a device in, upon, or by which any person or property is or may be transported or drawn upon a public highway, except devices moved by human power or used exclusively upon stationary rails or tracks ; including bicycles and ridden animals .
Section 2. That chapter 32-23 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows:

The provisions of this chapter do not apply to any person who is riding:

(1) A horse or other animal; and

(2) A bicycle, tricycle, or other unpowered foot-pedal conveyance.
 

Juan

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Then a lot of people say "the legislature just wastes their time"

:D :D :D :D :D :D
 

mrj

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Mike said:
Posted on Wed, Jan. 25, 2006
Horses and bikes may not be vehicles for long
JENNY MICHAEL
Associated Press

PIERRE, S.D. - Intoxicated South Dakotans should be able to ride horses or bikes home from bars without fear of being arrested for drunken driving, legislators decided Wednesday.

The House Transportation Committee voted 10-1 for a bill to exempt horses and bikes from the statutory definition of vehicles, sending HB1190 to the House floor.

Rep. Tom Hennies, R-Rapid City, said people who have been drinking and choose not to drive cars or trucks should not be punished for using alternate transportation.

"We should not push people to stop driving when they've been drinking, and at the same time penalize them if they get on a bicycle when they're drunk," the former police chief said.

Hennies told of a Pennington County man who was arrested several times for drunken driving, including a fourth arrest while pedaling a bicycle home one night. The man could have been sent to prison if he had been convicted, Hennies said.

"I don't know anybody that had that intent when we're talking about drunk drivers," he said.

A Pierre man was arrested several times in recent years for being drunk on his horse. At one trial, the man said he was upset for getting stopped because he had not been drinking and smelled of alcohol only because he had put liniment on his horse, adding that he wasn't a danger because his horse "knew the way home." He was found innocent that time.

Hennies acknowledged that drunks on bikes and horses can cause problems, but he said it would be better to charge them with disorderly conduct than drunken driving.

The bill would affect more than just drunken driving, Hennies said. He said people on horses and bikes would technically be excluded from other state traffic regulations, such as obeying stop signs, although most city ordinances would still require it.

"You won't have to buy a license plate for your horse, either," Hennies added.

Rep. Gordon Peterson, R-Wall, wondered if the bill signified the official end of the horse and buggy era in South Dakota.

"Cowboys that get drunk on Saturday nights and ride home in small towns won't like this too much," he said. "They won't have their fun with their cops."


Wonder if that was sort of a slap at the law officers who arrested a guy for riding his horse "under the influence"? Don't recall seeing the same happening to the bike riding drunk, but wonder if it did.

Somewhat related, re."local" law officers who are not up to snuff.........does a poor one do more damage than having none at all?

It seems to me a foolish officer can set back the efforts of parents and church/community leaders in teaching their kids to respect the law and law officers.

MRJ
MRJ
 

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