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Guard dog ?

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hillsdown

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After having to put down our 15 year old Scotch Collie last September the coyotes have been horrendous around here, not to mention the 2 legged unwanted visitors that now come onto our land without permission. :roll:

So I have been looking at getting another protector for calving and for me as well, being that I am here by myself 90% of the time. I found a 2 year old neutered Pyrenees 1/4 Anatolian cross for sale. I like the idea that he is older as am not in any hurry to train a pup especially with Nikki's surgery coming up again . They said they are selling him because he spends too much time at the neighbors playing with their dogs than staying home and working. That part worries me ,but my neighbors are 1/2 a mile away and their dogs are house dogs. However I sure would hate to adopt him only to find that he is not doing what he should be .

Just looking for iunput , should I chance it and adopt him or does he sound like more of a headache and wouldn't be worth all the trouble.

I am familiar with Pyrenese but not the Anatolians, would like feed back on that breed or the crosses please .

He is stricly outdoors, even in winter , supposed to be great with dogs, cats ,children and livestock.

Thank you :)
 

hillsdown

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katrina said:
I guess I would pass, just on the dog's history.. Wouldn't more of an agressive dog like a German Shepard of sorts be a better dog? JMHO

That worries me too, would hate to have a "couch potato" eating me out of house and home. Katrina I thought about a more aggressive breed but because of have a beloved cat and a pup that I love more than anything else, I am just too worried that they may end up attacking them too. Also the Pyrenees breed are just gentle giants and great around cows and calves..

Another twist. I called our local kill shelter by chance that they would have a cattle guard rescue in and they are nursing back to health a near starved abandoned 1-2 year old great Pyrenees . She is on the mend and will be ready to adopt soon. I don't know what to do, Bo was a rescue and more than likely saved my life when that Holstein bull penned me. If she is like him then I will have the best dog ever ,but she could be very timid and not want to work too. We also have a cougar here , that has been cruising around but no one has spotted him. If I can't get him and mount him on my mantle then I want a dog that will keep him out of my way :wink:

Thanks for the input :)
 

Faster horses

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The best indication of future behaviour is past behaviour---in humans
and in dogs. I'd pass on the first one, but something tells me you
should take a chance on the female one that was rescued. Those
kind of dogs have proven to be good ones, as you already know.

Let us know what you decide. A dog that doesn't stay home is
a problem and isn't worth a whole lot...seems males do that more
than females.

Good luck, HD. Any dog will be lucky to have you two as
owners!
 

MsSage

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I agree I would wait on the rescue female. unless you NEED a dog NOW.
I am sure wandering is what got my Dally with DAWGS I still battle with her to stay home. LOL At least she always comes home but crossing US 87 she might not make it home.
 

Wyoming Wind

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Faster horses said:
The best indication of future behaviour is past behaviour---in humans
and in dogs. I'd pass on the first one, but something tells me you
should take a chance on the female one that was rescued. Those
kind of dogs have proven to be good ones, as you already know.
!
I agree with the young female...she should, in my experience, bond very easily to you and your lifestyle (pets, livestock, family) especially with how she was starved to near death. We have had all types of dogs; we have a bluetick hound we use for hunting lions in the winter and she also helps move cows; and a mutt of all mutts who is the most loyal dog imaginable. He bonded as a pup in 2 hours to my husband who then left to guide hunters and was gone for 3 weeks---that bond came right out when he made it home and he hasn't left his side since. Once bonded they tend to get protective in a good way to your home; again, in my opinion! Best of luck with your decision!
 

sweetbasil

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I am including a few websites that can give you additional information about protective dogs. I personally recommend a German Shepard, they get along well with cats.

We have craiglist in the U.S., do you have anything similar in your area where you can place an ad?

http://bspilner.hubpages.com/hub/Find-A-Guard-Dog-That-Fits-Your-Lifestyle

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/361704/the_best_guard_dog_breeds_for_families_pg3.html?cat=53

Good Luck,
SB
 

jodywy

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my Acbash x Pyrenees bonded well with my hiefer calves when we wintered them with the ewes, She has also bonded well with the bulls. Takes a few year but if you keep alot of hiefers they can work with cows as good as sheep
 

hillsdown

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Thank you so much everyone for the responses/pm's and great advice . :tiphat:

Have a lot to consider , I will be meeting the kill shelter rescue gal tomorrow. I have spoken to the vet that is handling her case and she may be too much for me to take on at this time .
Remember I still have our beloved border collie pup Nikki going in for her right side femoral head removal surgery and will have 2 months of kennel rest only ,then light rehab and then at 6 months we will be doing heavy rehab . That is a plate full for one person let alone one person that has all the other stuff like calving etc going on as well.
Will keep you all updated .
Anyways, like I said , lots to think about . Thanks again .. :D
 

gcreekrch

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Leave the first dog alone. If he's running already, don't make it your problem. Sounds like the current owner's neighbors could have helped out by chasing the dog home in the first place.

Don't know the particulars about the other dog and I know you are a softy :D but vets don't know everything. :wink: She may work out fine. I am finding with the two we got this summer that guard dogs aren't neccessarily lapdogs. They have a job and that is all they are concerned with.
 

kelpies4me

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Do you want a dog to live with the cattle, or accompany you when you are out doing your rounds? The German Shepherds NEED company, they are not a livestock guardian dog, although they will protect your property- they will not be happy without you with them. If you want a dog to be in the yards when calving you should go with a livestock guardian breeds- and I know there are some good breeders up your way. The anatolian is a good breed, the maremma may be your best bet- does not require or really want close human contact but fiercely guards it's charges. The pyrenees is nice too, but I have heard more stories about them roaming off the premises than any other breed.
 

bubba

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I got a shepard husky and she is a very kind but protective dog. You might want to look into a german shepard.
 

George

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I have had German Shepherds as long as I can remember - - - I also take in and "retrain" problem shepherds from time to time. It normallly takes 2 weeks or less to turn a problem dog around and then you have to retrain the owners or what you have done will go up in smoke!

If you have the time to devote at least 1 hour a day and will watch " Dog Whisperer" you can have a great dog from the pound or any where esle they are available ( I sell about 20 a year but you are a little far )

If you cannot devote that much time you need to get an older dog that has been trained the way you want and then make sure you don't mess the dog up!
 

MsSage

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PLease dont get a heeler or aussie/kelpie they are great herding dogs but SUCK as guard dogs. Missy the kelpie cross slept through someone knocking on the door. :roll: Dally the heeler lifted her head off the pillow and looked LOLOLOLOL
Good luck and choose the dog that suits you best. You will know when you met them.
 

hillsdown

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Thanks everyone for all of the different insights and experiences . :)

I am going to give the 2 year old male a try. If he doesn't work out I already have a friend that lives on an acreage that wants him and he will be more of a house pet . Meeting him on Friday .
The rescue Pyrenees was just too much for me at this time, I have my hands full with Nikki again as she got into trouble last Thursday after herd health and sliced her little foot up really bad and is now in a splint/cast . We now have to push back surgery until late November . One thing after the other with her .

Here is a pic of Spartan .
IMG_2384-1.jpg


This is poor little Nikki in her cast , she is really sick of it but has at least another week and a half in it .
306367_2346071247933_1134577259_2806265_85524693_n-1.jpg
 

hillsdown

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Thanks FH , she can move around pretty good with it though and throws it around like a big club . So if I end up with a black eye or fat lip, just know that it most likely came from the pup. :lol:

I am looking through different sites etc to find the best dog house suitable for our cold weather and high winds in the winter. If anyone has some suggestions that work best for them in temps like we have would love to hear them . I am not prepared to have a 120lb dog in the house with us, or I should say hubby is not prepared . :p
 

Hayguy

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used to use an old chest style deep freezer, cut a door in the side, used a big mud flap for the door, put in a bafflel inside to deflect the wind, well insulated, and washable just open the lid and hose it out. used to use them for calf warmers as well, put a small electric heater in the bread box side, cut a circular hole in the lid and offset the piece with a sheet metal screw to give adjustable ventilation
 

jodywy

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hillsdown said:
Thanks FH , she can move around pretty good with it though and throws it around like a big club . So if I end up with a black eye or fat lip, just know that it most likely came from the pup. :lol:

I am looking through different sites etc to find the best dog house suitable for our cold weather and high winds in the winter. If anyone has some suggestions that work best for them in temps like we have would love to hear them . I am not prepared to have a 120lb dog in the house with us, or I should say hubby is not prepared . :p
our will not use a shelter, we feed in the late afternoon and she will commandeer a pile of hay
CIMG0644.jpg

late April dosn't matter
tired.jpg

her hair gets so thick she will get a little iced up but she will shake and it flys off
IMG_4250.jpg

we tried to get inside a open barn at -30 to -40 temps and she will not, she will get into the portable calf sheds in the spring to shade up , and during the summer she looks for shade when the sheep stop after feeding
 
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