• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Here is some research from the World Fact Book

Help Support Ranchers.net:

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Here is some research from the World Fact Book

COSTA RICA

Population 4 million

Purchasing power per capita $9,100

Population below poverty 20.6 percent

Ag products: coffee, pineapple, bananas, sugar, corn, rice, beans, potatoes, beef, timber

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment

Costa Rica's basically stable economy depends on tourism, agriculture, and electronics exports. Poverty has been substantially reduced over the past 15 years, and a strong social safety net has been put into place. Foreign investors remain attracted by the country's political stability and high education levels, and tourism continues to bring in foreign exchange. Low prices for coffee and bananas have hurt the agricultural sector. The government continues to grapple with its large deficit and massive internal debt. The reduction of inflation remains a difficult problem because of rises in the price of imports, labor market rigidities, and fiscal deficits. Costa Rica recently concluded negotiations to participate in the US - Central American Free Trade Agreement, which, if ratified by the Costa Rican Legislature, would result in economic reforms and an improved investment climate.

EL SALVADOR

Population 6.6 million

Purchasing power per capita $4,800

Population below poverty 48 percent

Ag products: coffee, sugar, corn, rice, beans, oilseeds, cotton, sorghum, shrimp, beef, dairy

Export commodities: offshore assembly exports, coffee, sugar, shrimp, textiles, chemicals, electricity

With the adoption of the US dollar as its currency, El Salvador has lost control over monetary policy and must concentrate on maintaining a disciplined fiscal policy. GDP per capita is roughly only half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and the distribution of income is highly unequal. The trade deficit has been offset by annual remittances of almost $2 billion from Salvadorans living abroad and external aid. The government is striving to open new export markets, encourage foreign investment, modernize the tax and healthcare systems, and stimulate the sluggish economy.



GUATEMALA

Population 14.3 million

Purchasing power per capita $4.100

Population below poverty 75 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, corn, bananas, coffee, beans, cardamom, cattle, sheep, pigs, chicken

Export commodities: coffee, sugar, bananas, fruit and vegetables, cardamom, meat, apparel, petroleum, electricity



Guatemala is the largest and most populous of the Central American countries with a GDP per capita roughly one-half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. The agricultural sector accounts for about one-fourth of GDP, two-thirds of exports, and half of the labor force. Coffee, sugar, and bananas are the main products. The 1996 signing of peace accords, which ended 36 years of civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment, but widespread political violence and corruption scandals continue to dampen investor confidence. The distribution of income remains highly unequal, with perhaps 75% of the population below the poverty line. Ongoing challenges include increasing government revenues, negotiating further assistance from international donors, upgrading both government and private financial operations, curtailing drug trafficking, and narrowing the trade deficit.



HONDURAS

Population 7 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,600

Population below poverty 53 percent

Ag products: bananas, coffee, citrus, beef, timber, shrimp

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, shrimp, lobster, MEAT, zinc, lumber

Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere with an extraordinarily unequal distribution of income and massive unemployment, is banking on expanded trade privileges under the Enhanced Caribbean Basin Initiative and on debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. While the country has met most of its macroeconomic targets, it has failed to meet the IMF's goals to liberalize its energy and telecommunications sectors. Growth remains dependent on the status of the US economy, its major trading partner, on commodity prices, particularly coffee, and on reduction of the high crime rate.



NICARAGUA

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,300

Population below poverty 50 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, cotton, corn, beef, dairy products, coffee, bananas, rice, tobacco, sesame, soya, beans, veal, pork, poultry

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment



Nicaragua, one of the hemisphere's poorest countries, faces low per capita income, massive unemployment, and huge external debt. Distribution of income is one of the most unequal on the globe. While the country has made progress toward macroeconomic stability over the past few years, GDP annual growth of 1.5% - 2.5% has been far too low to meet the country's need. Nicaragua will continue to be dependent on international aid and debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. Nicaragua has undertaken significant economic reforms that are expected to help the country qualify for more than $4 billion in debt relief under HIPC in early 2004. Donors have made aid conditional on the openness of government financial operation, poverty alleviation, and human rights. A three-year poverty reduction and growth plan, agreed to with the IMF in December 2002, guides economic policy.



DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $6,000

Population below poverty 25 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, coffee, cotton, cocoa tobacco, rice, beans, potatoes, corn, bananas, cattle, pigs, dairy, beef, eggs

Export commodities: ferronickel, sugar, gold, silver, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, meat, consumer goods



The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean representative democracy which enjoyed GDP growth of more than 7% in 1998-2000. Growth subsequently plummeted as part of the global economic slowdown. Although the country has long been viewed primarily as an exporter of sugar, coffee, and tobacco, in recent years the service sector has overtaken agriculture as the economy's largest employer, due to growth in tourism and free trade zones. The country suffers from marked income inequality; the poorest half of the population receives less than one-fifth of GNP, while the richest 10% enjoys nearly 40% of national income. Growth turned negative in 2003 with reduced tourism, a major bank fraud, and limited growth in the US economy, the source of 87% of export revenues. Resumption of a badly needed IMF loan was slowed due to government repurchase of electrical power plants.
 

Jinglebob

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
5,962
Reaction score
0
Location
Western South Dakota
Hay Maker;

I'm a little slow, so please 'splain all of this and what it is going to do to our country/livleyhood down the road, please? :? :???:

Or as some might say, and your point is? :lol:
 

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Jinglebob said:
Hay Maker;

I'm a little slow, so please 'splain all of this and what it is going to do to our country/livleyhood down the road, please? :? :???:

Or as some might say, and your point is? :lol:


MY point is CAFTA,and the fact how are these folks gonna make good tradin partners,more than half of them live under the poverty level..........good luck
 

jodywy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
5,309
Reaction score
9
Location
Cabin Creek, Carlile,Wyoming
and every one exports sugar
I not in a sugar beet farming area, but a sugar farmer told me once that every acre of sugar beets was $750 spent on the local main street... that a lot of money off a small towns main street when that $.30/hr sugar gets imported.
 

ez now

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 5, 2005
Messages
48
Reaction score
0
HAY MAKER said:
Jinglebob said:
Hay Maker;

I'm a little slow, so please 'splain all of this and what it is going to do to our country/livleyhood down the road, please? :? :???:

Or as some might say, and your point is? :lol:


MY point is CAFTA,and the fact how are these folks gonna make good tradin partners,more than half of them live under the poverty level..........good luck

Lets not forget the Latin America Free Trade Agreement thats coming next, In another twenty years our kids can move overseas and find a job
 

Cal

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
3,598
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern SD
ez now said:
HAY MAKER said:
Jinglebob said:
Hay Maker;

I'm a little slow, so please 'splain all of this and what it is going to do to our country/livleyhood down the road, please? :? :???:

Or as some might say, and your point is? :lol:


MY point is CAFTA,and the fact how are these folks gonna make good tradin partners,more than half of them live under the poverty level..........good luck

Lets not forget the Latin America Free Trade Agreement thats coming next, In another twenty years our kids can move overseas and find a job

S'pose yer pretty spooked at our 5% unemployment rate. Do you remember the history of what happened when trade was shut down in 1929 or thereabouts?
 

agman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,664
Reaction score
0
Location
Denver, CO
HAY MAKER said:
Here is some research from the World Fact Book

COSTA RICA

Population 4 million

Purchasing power per capita $9,100

Population below poverty 20.6 percent

Ag products: coffee, pineapple, bananas, sugar, corn, rice, beans, potatoes, beef, timber

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment

Costa Rica's basically stable economy depends on tourism, agriculture, and electronics exports. Poverty has been substantially reduced over the past 15 years, and a strong social safety net has been put into place. Foreign investors remain attracted by the country's political stability and high education levels, and tourism continues to bring in foreign exchange. Low prices for coffee and bananas have hurt the agricultural sector. The government continues to grapple with its large deficit and massive internal debt. The reduction of inflation remains a difficult problem because of rises in the price of imports, labor market rigidities, and fiscal deficits. Costa Rica recently concluded negotiations to participate in the US - Central American Free Trade Agreement, which, if ratified by the Costa Rican Legislature, would result in economic reforms and an improved investment climate.

EL SALVADOR

Population 6.6 million

Purchasing power per capita $4,800

Population below poverty 48 percent

Ag products: coffee, sugar, corn, rice, beans, oilseeds, cotton, sorghum, shrimp, beef, dairy

Export commodities: offshore assembly exports, coffee, sugar, shrimp, textiles, chemicals, electricity

With the adoption of the US dollar as its currency, El Salvador has lost control over monetary policy and must concentrate on maintaining a disciplined fiscal policy. GDP per capita is roughly only half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and the distribution of income is highly unequal. The trade deficit has been offset by annual remittances of almost $2 billion from Salvadorans living abroad and external aid. The government is striving to open new export markets, encourage foreign investment, modernize the tax and healthcare systems, and stimulate the sluggish economy.



GUATEMALA

Population 14.3 million

Purchasing power per capita $4.100

Population below poverty 75 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, corn, bananas, coffee, beans, cardamom, cattle, sheep, pigs, chicken

Export commodities: coffee, sugar, bananas, fruit and vegetables, cardamom, meat, apparel, petroleum, electricity



Guatemala is the largest and most populous of the Central American countries with a GDP per capita roughly one-half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. The agricultural sector accounts for about one-fourth of GDP, two-thirds of exports, and half of the labor force. Coffee, sugar, and bananas are the main products. The 1996 signing of peace accords, which ended 36 years of civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment, but widespread political violence and corruption scandals continue to dampen investor confidence. The distribution of income remains highly unequal, with perhaps 75% of the population below the poverty line. Ongoing challenges include increasing government revenues, negotiating further assistance from international donors, upgrading both government and private financial operations, curtailing drug trafficking, and narrowing the trade deficit.



HONDURAS

Population 7 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,600

Population below poverty 53 percent

Ag products: bananas, coffee, citrus, beef, timber, shrimp

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, shrimp, lobster, MEAT, zinc, lumber

Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere with an extraordinarily unequal distribution of income and massive unemployment, is banking on expanded trade privileges under the Enhanced Caribbean Basin Initiative and on debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. While the country has met most of its macroeconomic targets, it has failed to meet the IMF's goals to liberalize its energy and telecommunications sectors. Growth remains dependent on the status of the US economy, its major trading partner, on commodity prices, particularly coffee, and on reduction of the high crime rate.



NICARAGUA

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,300

Population below poverty 50 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, cotton, corn, beef, dairy products, coffee, bananas, rice, tobacco, sesame, soya, beans, veal, pork, poultry

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment



Nicaragua, one of the hemisphere's poorest countries, faces low per capita income, massive unemployment, and huge external debt. Distribution of income is one of the most unequal on the globe. While the country has made progress toward macroeconomic stability over the past few years, GDP annual growth of 1.5% - 2.5% has been far too low to meet the country's need. Nicaragua will continue to be dependent on international aid and debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. Nicaragua has undertaken significant economic reforms that are expected to help the country qualify for more than $4 billion in debt relief under HIPC in early 2004. Donors have made aid conditional on the openness of government financial operation, poverty alleviation, and human rights. A three-year poverty reduction and growth plan, agreed to with the IMF in December 2002, guides economic policy.



DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $6,000

Population below poverty 25 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, coffee, cotton, cocoa tobacco, rice, beans, potatoes, corn, bananas, cattle, pigs, dairy, beef, eggs

Export commodities: ferronickel, sugar, gold, silver, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, meat, consumer goods



The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean representative democracy which enjoyed GDP growth of more than 7% in 1998-2000. Growth subsequently plummeted as part of the global economic slowdown. Although the country has long been viewed primarily as an exporter of sugar, coffee, and tobacco, in recent years the service sector has overtaken agriculture as the economy's largest employer, due to growth in tourism and free trade zones. The country suffers from marked income inequality; the poorest half of the population receives less than one-fifth of GNP, while the richest 10% enjoys nearly 40% of national income. Growth turned negative in 2003 with reduced tourism, a major bank fraud, and limited growth in the US economy, the source of 87% of export revenues. Resumption of a badly needed IMF loan was slowed due to government repurchase of electrical power plants.

Response...The only data missing is a comparison to the U.S. The points is that without trade the U.S would likely differ very little from the countries you listed. The objective of every human being is to move up the ladder of prosperity and improve their standard of living. As such, your fears that they want want to tear us down to their level is misplaced.

Trade is not a one-way highway as is often incorrectly perceived. All participants benefit. Just look at the standard of living of those countries most open to trade as opposed to those who limit trade.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
agman said:
HAY MAKER said:
Here is some research from the World Fact Book

COSTA RICA

Population 4 million

Purchasing power per capita $9,100

Population below poverty 20.6 percent

Ag products: coffee, pineapple, bananas, sugar, corn, rice, beans, potatoes, beef, timber

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment

Costa Rica's basically stable economy depends on tourism, agriculture, and electronics exports. Poverty has been substantially reduced over the past 15 years, and a strong social safety net has been put into place. Foreign investors remain attracted by the country's political stability and high education levels, and tourism continues to bring in foreign exchange. Low prices for coffee and bananas have hurt the agricultural sector. The government continues to grapple with its large deficit and massive internal debt. The reduction of inflation remains a difficult problem because of rises in the price of imports, labor market rigidities, and fiscal deficits. Costa Rica recently concluded negotiations to participate in the US - Central American Free Trade Agreement, which, if ratified by the Costa Rican Legislature, would result in economic reforms and an improved investment climate.

EL SALVADOR

Population 6.6 million

Purchasing power per capita $4,800

Population below poverty 48 percent

Ag products: coffee, sugar, corn, rice, beans, oilseeds, cotton, sorghum, shrimp, beef, dairy

Export commodities: offshore assembly exports, coffee, sugar, shrimp, textiles, chemicals, electricity

With the adoption of the US dollar as its currency, El Salvador has lost control over monetary policy and must concentrate on maintaining a disciplined fiscal policy. GDP per capita is roughly only half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and the distribution of income is highly unequal. The trade deficit has been offset by annual remittances of almost $2 billion from Salvadorans living abroad and external aid. The government is striving to open new export markets, encourage foreign investment, modernize the tax and healthcare systems, and stimulate the sluggish economy.



GUATEMALA

Population 14.3 million

Purchasing power per capita $4.100

Population below poverty 75 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, corn, bananas, coffee, beans, cardamom, cattle, sheep, pigs, chicken

Export commodities: coffee, sugar, bananas, fruit and vegetables, cardamom, meat, apparel, petroleum, electricity



Guatemala is the largest and most populous of the Central American countries with a GDP per capita roughly one-half that of Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. The agricultural sector accounts for about one-fourth of GDP, two-thirds of exports, and half of the labor force. Coffee, sugar, and bananas are the main products. The 1996 signing of peace accords, which ended 36 years of civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment, but widespread political violence and corruption scandals continue to dampen investor confidence. The distribution of income remains highly unequal, with perhaps 75% of the population below the poverty line. Ongoing challenges include increasing government revenues, negotiating further assistance from international donors, upgrading both government and private financial operations, curtailing drug trafficking, and narrowing the trade deficit.



HONDURAS

Population 7 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,600

Population below poverty 53 percent

Ag products: bananas, coffee, citrus, beef, timber, shrimp

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, shrimp, lobster, MEAT, zinc, lumber

Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere with an extraordinarily unequal distribution of income and massive unemployment, is banking on expanded trade privileges under the Enhanced Caribbean Basin Initiative and on debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. While the country has met most of its macroeconomic targets, it has failed to meet the IMF's goals to liberalize its energy and telecommunications sectors. Growth remains dependent on the status of the US economy, its major trading partner, on commodity prices, particularly coffee, and on reduction of the high crime rate.



NICARAGUA

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $2,300

Population below poverty 50 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, cotton, corn, beef, dairy products, coffee, bananas, rice, tobacco, sesame, soya, beans, veal, pork, poultry

Export commodities: coffee, bananas, sugar, pineapple, textiles, electronic components, medical equipment



Nicaragua, one of the hemisphere's poorest countries, faces low per capita income, massive unemployment, and huge external debt. Distribution of income is one of the most unequal on the globe. While the country has made progress toward macroeconomic stability over the past few years, GDP annual growth of 1.5% - 2.5% has been far too low to meet the country's need. Nicaragua will continue to be dependent on international aid and debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative. Nicaragua has undertaken significant economic reforms that are expected to help the country qualify for more than $4 billion in debt relief under HIPC in early 2004. Donors have made aid conditional on the openness of government financial operation, poverty alleviation, and human rights. A three-year poverty reduction and growth plan, agreed to with the IMF in December 2002, guides economic policy.



DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Population 8.8 million

Purchasing power per capita $6,000

Population below poverty 25 percent

Ag products: sugar cane, coffee, cotton, cocoa tobacco, rice, beans, potatoes, corn, bananas, cattle, pigs, dairy, beef, eggs

Export commodities: ferronickel, sugar, gold, silver, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, meat, consumer goods



The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean representative democracy which enjoyed GDP growth of more than 7% in 1998-2000. Growth subsequently plummeted as part of the global economic slowdown. Although the country has long been viewed primarily as an exporter of sugar, coffee, and tobacco, in recent years the service sector has overtaken agriculture as the economy's largest employer, due to growth in tourism and free trade zones. The country suffers from marked income inequality; the poorest half of the population receives less than one-fifth of GNP, while the richest 10% enjoys nearly 40% of national income. Growth turned negative in 2003 with reduced tourism, a major bank fraud, and limited growth in the US economy, the source of 87% of export revenues. Resumption of a badly needed IMF loan was slowed due to government repurchase of electrical power plants.

Response...The only data missing is a comparison to the U.S. The points is that without trade the U.S would likely differ very little from the countries you listed. The objective of every human being is to move up the ladder of prosperity and improve their standard of living. As such, your fears that they want want to tear us down to their level is misplaced.

Trade is not a one-way highway as is often incorrectly perceived. All participants benefit. Just look at the standard of living of those countries most open to trade as opposed to those who limit trade.


I have a hard time believing that the main goal of the industrialists-the Tysons and Rockefellers of the world- is to raise the poor Latin and South Americans out of poverty....I would bet $100 goes in their own pockets for every $1 that goes to raise the populations standard of living....And if it bankrupts a US farm industry (sugar beets) while its at it-- so what :???:
 

agman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,664
Reaction score
0
Location
Denver, CO
Oldtimer said:
agman said:
Response...The only data missing is a comparison to the U.S. The points is that without trade the U.S would likely differ very little from the countries you listed. The objective of every human being is to move up the ladder of prosperity and improve their standard of living. As such, your fears that they want want to tear us down to their level is misplaced.

Trade is not a one-way highway as is often incorrectly perceived. All participants benefit. Just look at the standard of living of those countries most open to trade as opposed to those who limit trade.


I have a hard time believing that the main goal of the industrialists-the Tysons and Rockefellers of the world- is to raise the poor Latin and South Americans out of poverty....I would bet $100 goes in their own pockets for every $1 that goes to raise the populations standard of living....And if it bankrupts a US farm industry (sugar beets) while its at it-- so what :???:

I would expect such an answer from you. But then again, you repeatedly display your limited knowledge. That is why you are comfortable with accusations and innuendos; facts, well you seldom have any.
 

Latest posts

Top