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VB RANCH

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Agriculture Department confirmed on Tuesday that it found a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, the nation's fourth, in a dairy cow in central California.

The USDA has begun to notify world animal health authorities at the OIE as well as its trading partners, but the finding should not affect the nation's beef exports, said John Clifford, the USDA's chief veterinary officer.

"There is really no concern for alarm here with regards to this animal. Both human health and animal health are protected with regards to this issue," Clifford told reporters at a briefing at USDA headquarters.

The first outbreak of mad cow in the United States occurred in late 2003, roiling global trade in beef.

It is believed that humans can contract a similar deadly brain disease by eating infected parts from an animal with mad cow disease.

Live cattle futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange fell by as much as the 3-cent-per-lb daily limit on Tuesday on fund liquidation and selling stemming from the rumors.

"The impact should not affect expects. Now, I'm not saying it may or may not, but it should not," Clifford said, noting that the United States has been recognized by authorities as having taken steps to control its risks for the disease.

"There is really no concern for alarm here with regards to this animal. Both human health and animal health are protected with regards to this issue," Clifford said.

(Reporting by Roberta Rampton; Editing by Bob Burgdorfer)
 

VB RANCH

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Statement by USDA Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford Regarding a Detection of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in the United States

Assures Consumers That Existing Safeguards Protected Food Supply; Reiterates Safety of Consuming Beef Products

WASHINGTON, April 24, 2012 – USDA Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford today released the following statement on the detection of BSE in the United States:

"As part of our targeted surveillance system, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the nation's fourth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a dairy cow from central California. The carcass of the animal is being held under State authority at a rendering facility in California and will be destroyed. It was never presented for slaughter for human consumption, so at no time presented a risk to the food supply or human health. Additionally, milk does not transmit BSE.

"The United States has had longstanding interlocking safeguards to protect human and animal health against BSE. For public health, these measures include the USDA ban on specified risk materials, or SRMs, from the food supply. SRMs are parts of the animal that are most likely to contain the BSE agent if it is present in an animal. USDA also bans all nonambulatory (sometimes called "downer") cattle from entering the human food chain. For animal health, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ban on ruminant material in cattle feed prevents the spread of the disease in the cattle herd.

"Evidence shows that our systems and safeguards to prevent BSE are working, as are similar actions taken by countries around the world. In 2011, there were only 29 worldwide cases of BSE, a dramatic decline and 99% reduction since the peak in 1992 of 37,311 cases. This is directly attributable to the impact and effectiveness of feed bans as a primary control measure for the disease.


"Samples from the animal in question were tested at USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. Confirmatory results using immunohistochemistry and western blot tests confirmed the animal was positive for atypical BSE, a very rare form of the disease not generally associated with an animal consuming infected feed.

"We are sharing our laboratory results with international animal health reference laboratories in Canada and England, which have official World Animal Health (OIE) reference labs. These labs have extensive experience diagnosing atypical BSE and will review our confirmation of this form of the disease. In addition, we will be conducting a comprehensive epidemiological investigation in conjunction with California animal and public health officials and the FDA.

"BSE is a progressive neurological disease among cattle that is always fatal. It belongs to a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Affected animals may display nervousness or aggression, abnormal posture, difficulty in coordination and rising, decreased milk production, or loss of body weight despite continued appetite.


"This detection in no way affects the United States' BSE status as determined by the OIE. The United States has in place all of the elements of a system that OIE has determined ensures that beef and beef products are safe for human consumption: a mammalian feed ban, removal of specified risk materials, and vigorous surveillance. Consequently, this detection should not affect U.S. trade.

"USDA remains confident in the health of the national herd and the safety of beef and dairy products. As the epidemiological investigation progresses, USDA will continue to communicate findings in a timely and transparent manner."

#

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).
 

VB RANCH

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http://www.cmegroup.com/trading/agricultural/livestock/feeder-cattle.html

sure hit the future's market
don't even show any fat future's
 

canadian angus

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As all Canadian Cattle producers remember May 20th, 2003 how it hurt. There was pointing, name calling, and major depression in mind and dreams.

As a fellow livestock producer, we are not at fault, it can happen and as the reports come out, you will see many explanations. Cats eat mice, but we don't intentionally feed dead stock to our cows. May common sence prevail!

CA
 

eatbeef

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We need to bring out the positive in this. Our safety precautions work! It was caught before it entered any food chain and no harm has happened. The bigger stink that is made of this the worse off we are. Live and feeder cattle futures are up on globex as we speak, who knows what will happen in the pit tomorrow. Consumers need to see that our system is working and consumer safety is our utmost concern. EAT BEEF!
 

Kato

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According to the news report I read, it was the atypical variant, not the type implicated in CJD. My prediction? A couple of days of news stories, then calmer heads prevail, things settle down and get back to business. In the meantime, you can bet there will be money made in those volatile futures markets.

Unlike what happened to us in Canada in 2003, which was widespread panic, fearmongering, trade sanctions, backstabbing, lost markets, and ten years of economic hardship that led to the loss of the vast majority of our cattle producers. Here it did a lot of permanent damage, and was the equivalent to the Great Depression for a lot of us. Those left standing are a pretty tough, lean and efficient bunch, and are way past being bothered by news like this.

Anybody finds the need to learn how to live on air for two years, out of the garden for four more, and at the level of a welfare recipient for a couple after that, we'd all be glad to give lessons. I wish that was a joke, but it's not.
 

4Diamond

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Did anyone read how the board traders got tipped off this report was going to get released which then caused a huge sell-off followed by a huge jump yesterday?

If those futures traders had to take delivery of live breathing animals, they may do things different.

I may be a conspiracy theorist but I think 90% of the "Pink Slime" fiasco was trader induced.
 

Broke Cowboy

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canadian angus said:
As all Canadian Cattle producers remember May 20th, 2003 how it hurt. There was pointing, name calling, and major depression in mind and dreams.

As a fellow livestock producer, we are not at fault, it can happen and as the reports come out, you will see many explanations. Cats eat mice, but we don't intentionally feed dead stock to our cows. May common sence prevail!

CA

Well put my good friend

This is a topic I usually avoid as it raise my blood pressure a bit at times.

Having been cussed, called down and told I raise schitte diseased cattle more times than I care to remember during those days of old.

Last year Canada imported about 191,000 tonnes of US beef - to the tune of just over one billion dollars of trade.

I told my wife last night that some folks have forgotten many things about the times we had - and I still owe about $265,000 from that fiasco - should be free and clear in another 10 years or so. The cost of saving the place.

There was a time we could have used a little of the same support but it was never forthcoming from folks who held any power to make a statement or turn the tide - hopefully there will be some here who appreciate this - it does not matter about the type of BSE - it does not matter about the history - it does not matter about the type of cow - it does not matter about the location - just read - note who said it and remember and for damm sure - remember!!

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/04/24/canada-us-case-mad-cow-wont-hurt-trade/#ixzz1t6k2gPo4

Here it is as copy and paste:


TORONTO – Canada says a new case of mad cow disease in the U.S. will not affect trade between the two countries.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Tuesday both countries have implemented science-based measures to protect animal and human health. The agency also noted that U.S. officials have confirmed that no part of this animal's carcass entered the food system.

The United States closed its border to Canadian beef in 2003 after sick cows were detected in Canada.

Dennis Laycraft, the executive vice president of Canadian Cattlemen's Association, says there's no reason for any country to ban U.S. beef imports because now the rules for market access are science based and not just knee jerk reactions.

He says mad cow cost Canada's industry between $6 and $10 billion.


I truly hope all goes well in the industry down there - I hope your prices are not affected and I hope your sales are not affected - although some countries have closed the door I hope they re-open soon

My best to all - hope you have a great and safe day with family and friends

BC
 

Soapweed

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Broke Cowboy said:
canadian angus said:
As all Canadian Cattle producers remember May 20th, 2003 how it hurt. There was pointing, name calling, and major depression in mind and dreams.

As a fellow livestock producer, we are not at fault, it can happen and as the reports come out, you will see many explanations. Cats eat mice, but we don't intentionally feed dead stock to our cows. May common sence prevail!

CA

Well put my good friend

This is a topic I usually avoid as it raise my blood pressure a bit at times.

Having been cussed, called down and told I raise schitte diseased cattle more times than I care to remember during those days of old.

Last year Canada imported about 191,000 tonnes of US beef - to the tune of just over one billion dollars of trade.

I told my wife last night that some folks have forgotten many things about the times we had - and I still owe about $265,000 from that fiasco - should be free and clear in another 10 years or so. The cost of saving the place.

There was a time we could have used a little of the same support but it was never forthcoming from folks who held any power to make a statement or turn the tide - hopefully there will be some here who appreciate this - it does not matter about the type of BSE - it does not matter about the history - it does not matter about the type of cow - it does not matter about the location - just read - note who said it and remember and for damm sure - remember!!

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/04/24/canada-us-case-mad-cow-wont-hurt-trade/#ixzz1t6k2gPo4

Here it is as copy and paste:


TORONTO – Canada says a new case of mad cow disease in the U.S. will not affect trade between the two countries.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Tuesday both countries have implemented science-based measures to protect animal and human health. The agency also noted that U.S. officials have confirmed that no part of this animal's carcass entered the food system.

The United States closed its border to Canadian beef in 2003 after sick cows were detected in Canada.

Dennis Laycraft, the executive vice president of Canadian Cattlemen's Association, says there's no reason for any country to ban U.S. beef imports because now the rules for market access are science based and not just knee jerk reactions.

He says mad cow cost Canada's industry between $6 and $10 billion.


I truly hope all goes well in the industry down there - I hope your prices are not affected and I hope your sales are not affected - although some countries have closed the door I hope they re-open soon

My best to all - hope you have a great and safe day with family and friends

BC

I commend you Canadians for certainly having a much better and more positive attitude about the current BSE problem in the United States, than we did in 2003 when the tables were turned. My respect for R-Calf was totally lost for the way they looked down their nose at you at that time. As far as isolated BSE incidents are concerned, we all need to keep proper perspective and not throw the baby out with the bathwater. Beef is a wonderful food, high in nutrients, and very healthy. When the Donner Party was stranded in the high Sierras, and totally immobilized by deep snow, I'll just bet that even a "mad cow" would have been mighty welcome on their empty plates.
 

Faster horses

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Soapweed said:
Broke Cowboy said:
canadian angus said:
As all Canadian Cattle producers remember May 20th, 2003 how it hurt. There was pointing, name calling, and major depression in mind and dreams.

As a fellow livestock producer, we are not at fault, it can happen and as the reports come out, you will see many explanations. Cats eat mice, but we don't intentionally feed dead stock to our cows. May common sence prevail!

CA

Well put my good friend

This is a topic I usually avoid as it raise my blood pressure a bit at times.

Having been cussed, called down and told I raise schitte diseased cattle more times than I care to remember during those days of old.

Last year Canada imported about 191,000 tonnes of US beef - to the tune of just over one billion dollars of trade.

I told my wife last night that some folks have forgotten many things about the times we had - and I still owe about $265,000 from that fiasco - should be free and clear in another 10 years or so. The cost of saving the place.

There was a time we could have used a little of the same support but it was never forthcoming from folks who held any power to make a statement or turn the tide - hopefully there will be some here who appreciate this - it does not matter about the type of BSE - it does not matter about the history - it does not matter about the type of cow - it does not matter about the location - just read - note who said it and remember and for damm sure - remember!!

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/04/24/canada-us-case-mad-cow-wont-hurt-trade/#ixzz1t6k2gPo4

Here it is as copy and paste:


TORONTO – Canada says a new case of mad cow disease in the U.S. will not affect trade between the two countries.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Tuesday both countries have implemented science-based measures to protect animal and human health. The agency also noted that U.S. officials have confirmed that no part of this animal's carcass entered the food system.

The United States closed its border to Canadian beef in 2003 after sick cows were detected in Canada.

Dennis Laycraft, the executive vice president of Canadian Cattlemen's Association, says there's no reason for any country to ban U.S. beef imports because now the rules for market access are science based and not just knee jerk reactions.

He says mad cow cost Canada's industry between $6 and $10 billion.


I truly hope all goes well in the industry down there - I hope your prices are not affected and I hope your sales are not affected - although some countries have closed the door I hope they re-open soon

My best to all - hope you have a great and safe day with family and friends

BC

I commend you Canadians for certainly having a much better and more positive attitude about the current BSE problem in the United States, than we did in 2003 when the tables were turned. My respect for R-Calf was totally lost for the way they looked down their nose at you at that time. As far as isolated BSE incidents are concerned, we all need to keep proper perspective and not throw the baby out with the bathwater. Beef is a wonderful food, high in nutrients, and very healthy. When the Donner Party was stranded in the high Sierras, and totally immobilized by deep snow, I'll just bet that even a "mad cow" would have been mighty welcome on their empty plates.

:agree:

Too much was said back then. That should not have happened.
My thoughts were that someday they might have to eat those words.

Glad you are back posting, BC!! You are an asset to this board.
 

VB RANCH

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With a few exceptions, our international trading partners have not overreacted to last-week’s discovery of an atypical case of BSE in a U.S. dairy cow. Speaking with AgriTalk Radio host Mike Adams on Monday, U.S. Meat Export Federation president and CEO Phil Seng said only one country – Indonesia – has officially blocked imports of U.S. beef. The government of Thailand, meanwhile, has publicly stated its intention to ban U.S. beef, but has not officially informed U.S. officials of such action.

In South Korea, Seng says, the market for U.S. beef remains open. The only action the government has taken is to increase inspections of imported beef from 3 percent to 50 percent. Demand for U.S. beef in Korea has dropped, however, as one major retailer has stopped stocking U.S. beef and others, while continuing to stock it, have stopped promoting it. A problem in South Korea is that the media is, up to this point, “doing their own investigation” of the issue, in the absence of an official statement from the Korean government or a final epidemiological report from the United States. Once that report becomes available, which Seng expects to occur soon, the Korean media will lose some of their ability to stir up emotional responses.

Response in Japan has been very positive, Seng says. The Japanese people awoke last Tuesday to the news of the BSE case, and by 10 A.M. local time, the government had announced it would not make any changes in its policy for U.S. beef imports. Japanese officials also indicated this case would not affect the country’s current evaluation of its restriction on importing U.S. beef from cattle 20 months or older, potentially leading to looser restrictions with a 30-month age limit.

Seng says there has been no significant reduction in U.S. beef sales in Japan or resistance from retailers.

Overall, Seng says, the international response to this case has been tremendously different from the immediate shutdown in exports after the initial U.S. case of BSE in 2003. A major difference is that most of our trading partners have agreed to abide by the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) regarding BSE. These agreements stipulate that countries will not change their import policies for U.S. beef unless our OIE status as a “controlled risk” country is downgraded. Based on the scientific facts behind this latest BSE case, the OIE has left our risk status unchanged. So, if governments use this BSE case to create trade barriers, the United States has options for recourse, on scientific grounds, through the World Trade Organization (WTO).

The OIE, and most of our trading partners, recognize that of the four cases of BSE discovered in the United States over the past nine years, only one was of the “classical” strain attributed to feed. The other three, including last week’s case, were “atypical” or sporadic cases. In addition, the California cow discovered to have BSE in this latest case was delivered to a rendering plant, with no part of it entering the food supply.

Our surveillance system targets older cattle with a potential for BSE and exceeds OIE recommendations by 100 times, Seng says. Internationally, health officials recognize that the system is working.

The next step in international markets, Seng says, is to win back public confidence in U.S. beef. Already, the USMEF is working with the Beef Checkoff and USDA’s Foreign Market Development Program to communicate with the international media, bloggers and consumers to inform them about BSE and the safeguards the United States employs to assure the safety of U.S. beef.
 

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