• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Is 77 lbs a big calf for a Charolais heifer?

LRAF

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
159
Reaction score
0
Location
VA
If she had it unassisted and both are ok then no. That's just my opinion though.
 

Whitewing

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Venezuela
Unassisted, I think, but I didn't specifically ask. Both are fine apparently because when they're not, I hear about it.

Most of the mine run about 25 kilos or 55 lbs.

I had one that was way less than that when born but quickly caught up with the others. To this day he's called ratton, or mouse. :lol:
 

Shortgrass

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
2,386
Reaction score
1
Location
Eastern Colorado
I'll bet it was unassisted. Brahman are long slender critters. If they don't ear-lock :wink: . I've had lots of heifers with calves that big.
 

per

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Messages
6,430
Reaction score
1
Location
SW Alberta
Back in my "Continental" period we had lots of heifer calves in the 80 lb range unassisted. Unassisted being the key word here. Not to worry.
 

Whitewing

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Venezuela
Shortgrass said:
I'll bet it was unassisted. Brahman are long slender critters. If they don't ear-lock :wink: . I've had lots of heifers with calves that big.

Aside from putting some new genes in my animals, I figured a Brahman might be a good one to cross with those Charolais heifers because they are long and slender critters.

Our animals are generally smaller than what you guys run up 'north'. A 77 lb calf seems to get a lot of attention in my area.
 

George

Well-known member
Joined
May 29, 2005
Messages
2,344
Reaction score
0
Location
Indiana
I would feel it is about right for Charolis - - - but that is assuming your hiefer is like mine and I don't want to make that assumption.
 

jingo2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Messages
907
Reaction score
0
You're lucky it wasnt' 115 to 150lbs.

Them beasts are bred for work and hauling ....not maternal strengths at all.

You wanna raise and sell oxen...great choice then
 

Bward

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
192
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta
I thought you were being sarcastic. :) Some of those Brahma sired continental dam crosses can be huge! 77 pounds is a peanut.
 

Whitewing

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Venezuela
Bward said:
I thought you were being sarcastic. :) Some of those Brahma sired continental dam crosses can be huge! 77 pounds is a peanut.

Nope. This is easily the largest calf I've had on the place though it's the first batch of Brahma/Charolais crosses. This one weighed 35 kilos, they usually come in the range of 22 - 26 kilos.

As I said, S. American cattle tend to run smaller than their N. American cousins.
 

jingo2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Messages
907
Reaction score
0
Whitewing said:
Bward said:
I thought you were being sarcastic. :) Some of those Brahma sired continental dam crosses can be huge! 77 pounds is a peanut.

Nope. This is easily the largest calf I've had on the place though it's the first batch of Brahma/Charolais crosses. This one weighed 35 kilos, they usually come in the range of 22 - 26 kilos.

As I said, S. American cattle tend to run smaller than their N. American cousins.

I hope you or some of them vaqueros have chains or whatever ready ......you'll have one that will either kill the cow or kill the calf coming.

It's just trouble waiting to happen if you are breeding a Chevy bull on bramer females....

Down right stupid really.......................
 

Whitewing

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Venezuela
jingo2 said:
Whitewing said:
Bward said:
I thought you were being sarcastic. :) Some of those Brahma sired continental dam crosses can be huge! 77 pounds is a peanut.

Nope. This is easily the largest calf I've had on the place though it's the first batch of Brahma/Charolais crosses. This one weighed 35 kilos, they usually come in the range of 22 - 26 kilos.

As I said, S. American cattle tend to run smaller than their N. American cousins.

I hope you or some of them vaqueros have chains or whatever ready ......you'll have one that will either kill the cow or kill the calf coming.

It's just trouble waiting to happen if you are breeding a Chevy bull on bramer females....

Down right stupid really.......................

I routinely cross my Charolais bulls with mestiza cows, pretty much without problem so far.....after several years.

My mestiza and Charolais heifers I cross with a Brahman bull because I figure it's better for their first birthing.

Oh, and good Sunday morning sunshine.
 

Shortgrass

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
2,386
Reaction score
1
Location
Eastern Colorado
jingo2 said:
You're lucky it wasnt' 115 to 150lbs.

Them beasts are bred for work and hauling ....not maternal strengths at all.

You wanna raise and sell oxen...great choice then

I can tell you are a fan of smaller cattle, of which there certainly is a place for, and I can also tell you have had little actual experience with Chars. Now, you can tell I like em' , they work for me. I am able to produce the type that work for feeders, as there is little demand for oxen any more. I have seen a couple of calves around the 115 mark, too large for any breed, but in 25 years of raising them I've never had a calf toward the 150 mark. As with any breed, there is a great difference between animals. I successfully strive to produce 70 - 80 lb calves on heifers, and 90 - 100 lb calves on mature cows. You can find Angus bulls that will do the same thing for you. Sorry, but your remark just hit me wrong :lol: . If you raise cattle, and have some that work in your program, just stay with it. :wink:
 

Whitewing

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,855
Reaction score
0
Location
Venezuela
I'll say this Shortgrass, I love my Charolais. They're from a line that was originally from the US, spent many years in Cuba, and then made their way to Venezuela.

There aren't many of us breeding them in Venezuela both those of us who do breed them, like them. I find them really docile and easy to manage, right up to the largest and oldest bulls. And they're doing well on grass alone.

The guys at my ranch love 'em too as most had never worked with them before. In fact, when we bring in a new animal and it's overly wild, they're wanting to ship it off immediately for slaughter as they've gotten used to the tameness of the Charolais.

I'm crossing the Charolais with my mestizo herd because the offspring make really impressive animals. Having said that, I'm still producing pure-bred Charolais and sell several bulls every year to nearby herds whose owners are impressed when they see the crosses we're producing.
 

Silver

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
5,144
Reaction score
15
Location
BC
Around here a 77 lb birth weight is a real nice average birth weight for heifers and should mean a relatively trouble free calving season.
 

Latest posts

Top