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Janet Napolitano knows nothing......

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hypocritexposer

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Willful ignorance or stupidity, it is one or the other.......

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told a House committee that she is “not aware” of any actions the Obama administration has taken against countries that will not accept back illegal immigrants in “deportation status,” some of whom have committed crimes. After a “six-month detention period,” the illegal immigrants are released within the United States.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2011/10/27/napolitano-silent-on-alternatives-while-criminal-aliens-released-in-us/#ixzz1c3iD4pgd




“Isn’t it true that if they are in a deportation status and their home country will not accept them, that you release them back into the communities based on a ruling?” asked Republican Rep. Sandy Adams of Florida on Wednesday during a House Judiciary Committee hearing.

“Yeah, there’s a Supreme Court case called Zadvydas [vs. Davis], which is a due-process case, which, if the home country cannot accept or will not accept, gives us about a six-month detention period,” said Napolitano.

“And in fact,” Rep. Adams continued, “some of these people have come back into the communities and committed heinous crimes, truly heinous … Section 243(d) of the Immigration and Nationality Act requires the government to sanction countries that refuse to repatriate by suspending issuance of immigrant or non-immigrant visas, or both, to nationals of the country until it takes aliens back.”

“DHS is supposed to order or give the country that refuses to take back its aliens — the Secretary of State ‘shall order’ — that the visas to its citizens be suspended,” Adams concluded. ”How many have you recommended under Section 243(d)?”

Napolitano answered, “We have not — what we have done is work with — there are countries that systemically refuse to accept their aliens back.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2011/10/27/napolitano-silent-on-alternatives-while-criminal-aliens-released-in-us/#ixzz1c3ib5y29
 

Steve

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she is in charge or security and doesn't know the answer to security related questions?

but what about those countries?
China put U.S. immigration laws to the test

China is refusing to take back 40,000 deportable immigrants

If illegal immigrants "are not accepted back, then, for all intents and purposes, they are free to remain in this country because we have no place to remove them to,"

Key to the Department of Homeland Security's recent get-tough plan on immigration enforcement, which began last November, is the end of what it calls "catch and release" -- apprehending illegal immigrants and then releasing them into the U.S. population while negotiating their return home with their government. Department officials are awaiting completion of thousands of new prison beds next year -- bringing the total to 30,000 -- so that many of those people can be jailed while awaiting deportation, which they hope will also discourage others from immigrating to the U.S.

But China's refusal to accept returnees by not issuing travel documents undercuts U.S. attempts to discourage illegal entrants. "If the removal process has any deterrent effect, you have to show that people are being removed," says Paul Virtue, former general counsel to the immigration service.

Worse, though, it shows what few options the U.S. has in enforcing its deportation policy when other countries won't cooperate. "If China wants to dig in its heels, we would have real limitations," says Doris Meissner, who was immigration commissioner in the Clinton administration.

Of the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the U.S., about 550,000 have received final removal orders from an immigration judge but remain at large, says Homeland Security. While Chinese account for only a small share of those ordered deported, they are "the largest population that we've had difficulty in returning," Mr. Chertoff told the AEI audience.

In the fiscal year that ended in September, Homeland Security says it was able to deport just 522 Chinese whose appeals had been exhausted. Even that was a drop from about 600 in each of the two previous years.

International convention holds that countries take back their nationals upon request. China's refusal is "breaking international norms and codes of conduct," Ms. Meissner says. But a handful of countries are routinely slow -- or like Cuba, simply refuse -- to issue the travel documents that allow the U.S. to return their citizens, says Susan Martin, director of Georgetown University's Institute for the Study of International Migration.

Nigeria, among others, has disputed attempts to return its nationals who have been convicted of crimes in the U.S., arguing that they turned to criminality while they were in the U.S. and shouldn't be Nigeria's responsibility. El Salvador has worried about taking back gang members for fear they will aggravate street crime. Somalia doesn't have a central government that can negotiate its citizens' return.

As of February, at least eight countries were refusing to take back 139,000 illegal immigrants that the United States has ordered deported, including Vietnam, Jamaica, China, India, Ethiopia, Laos, Eritrea, and Iran, according to Specter's office. They include 18,000 convicted felons. More countries refuse to take back immigrants, but the eight were the major violators, staffers said.
 

Steve

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Fact check: Is Ted Poe right when he says feds give ‘convicted foreign criminals a get-out-of-jail-free card to live in the U.S

Texas Rep. Ted Poe has filed a bill that would stop diplomats from securing U.S. visas if the diplomat’s nation doesn’t allow the United States to return its nationals who have moved to the United States, committed a crime and been ordered to be deported.

When a legal or illegal immigrant commits a serious crime in the United States, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency orders the criminal to return to their country of origin, according to a press release issued last Thursday by the Humble Republican. The release says that “in many cases the home countries either delay or refuse to accept and repatriate their nationals.”

Based on the Supreme Court’s 2001 ruling in Zadvydas v. Davis, if ICE is unable to remove a convicted criminal within a reasonable time frame – defined as 180 days – and the removal seems unlikely in the foreseeable future, then the agency might be forced to release the criminal even if the immigrant has a criminal history.

However, ICE may hold a hearing before an immigration judge to continue to detain an immigrant whose release would pose a special danger to the public – often if they have committed a violent crime or have been deemed mentally unstable.

ICE has released 12,567 individual aliens — including both criminal and non-criminals — since the beginning of fiscal year 2009 based on the terms of the Zadvydas settlement, according to a May 24, 2011 statement that Gary Mead, ICE’s executive associate director for enforcement and removal operations, submitted to the House Judiciary Committee.

The reality

According to Poe’s release, more than 138,000 foreign criminals “are living freely in the United States because our country has not created an incentive to make these nations take their criminals back.”

The press release also includes a “Top Ten list of Offenders”, drawn from the same ICE table. Poe’s press release list — which labels the “Total Pending Final Order” individuals “# of criminals remaining in the United States” — lists Cuba, China, India, Jamaica and Pakistan as the worst offenders

The listed countries do have some of the highest tendencies to refuse repatriation, but the real numbers are considerably lower than the press release chart implies. For example, 7,153 criminals from Cuba were released because they could not be repatriated in 2011, but the chart lists the 49,966 Cubans waiting on a final order as the “# of criminals remaining in the United States.”

and thanks to this fiasco we have great movies like Scarface... :?
 
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