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Japanese Market Now Open-OFFICIALY

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STATEMENT BY AGRICULTURE SECRETARY MIKE JOHANNS REGARDING THE OPENING OF THE JAPANESE MARKET TO U.S. BEEF

December 12, 2005


"I'm very pleased to announce that the Japanese market is now open to U.S. beef products. Resuming beef trade with Japan is great news for American producers and Japanese consumers, as well as an important step toward normalized trade based on scientifically sound, internationally recognized standards.

"Reopening the Japanese market to U.S. beef has been a top priority for me since becoming Secretary, and I want to thank the many people and organizations who have been instrumental in this success. First and foremost, my thanks to President Bush for being personally and directly engaged in this effort. I want to thank my colleagues in the President's cabinet, Secretaries Rice, Snow, Gutierrez and Ambassador Portman, as well as Ambassadors Baker and Schieffer, for making this issue a centerpiece of their discussions with Japan. I also extend my thanks to Chairmen Goodlatte and Chambliss, the entire American meat industry, and all of the USDA staff involved with the many meetings, site visits, reports and other consultations with Japan's food safety officials to confirm the safety of U.S. beef.

"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals. Building bridges of understanding and collaboration between nations is an important part of ensuring food safety. American producers are proud of our safe, high-quality beef products and we greatly value the opportunity to promote the safety of our products to consumers in Japan and around the world. As I have said many times throughout this process, our goal is the resumption of normal beef trade throughout the world and we will continue to aggressively work toward that objective."

Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan. More than 94 percent of total U.S. ruminant and ruminant products, with a total export value of $1.7 billion in 2003, are now eligible for export to Japan. In 2003, the United States exported $1.4 billion worth of beef and beef products to Japan. Prior to the December 2003 discovery of the first BSE-infected cow in the United States, the U.S. exported beef and beef products to 119 countries. With the opening of Japan, 70 countries have now established trade to at least selected U.S. beef and beef products.




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Mike

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"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.
 
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Anonymous

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Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.

Be interesting to see what Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc agree to for age...

Then what do we tell US consumers when we are importing 30 month from a country with a higher rate of BSE... :???:
 

agman

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Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?

The work begins immediately to gain acceptance of UTM cattle. The groundwork has been laid for that progression.




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.
 

agman

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Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?


Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.

The work begins immediately to gain acceptance of UTM cattle. The groundwork has been laid for that progression.
 

Jason

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Agman, does the US have a way to satisfy Japan with 20 month cattle?

Canada has a system in place tied to the ID tags. Is the carcass evaluation accurate enough to tell 20 months? Or is that a different age?

I could possibly see Canada getting cattle to Japan sooner than the US if the Canadian ID tags are the ones to meet the requirements.

Whatever, it is good news for all producers, both sides of the 49th.

Cull cows passed 50 cents here last week, calves remain strong, fats are still climbing slowly.
 

Bill

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Oldtimer said:
Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.

Be interesting to see what Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc agree to for age...

Then what do we tell US consumers when we are importing 30 month from a country with a higher rate of BSE... :???:
Tell them that Canada has a better system of identifying it's cattle including those which had BSE although I am sure consumers that know what BSE is such as yourself realize that already. Then you can tell them that the risk is the same in both countries and that OTM Canadian beef is as or more safe than any other country in the world including the US. :lol:
 

Mike

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Japanese restaurant won't serve U.S. beef

TOKYO, Dec. 12 (UPI) -- A Japanese restaurant chain says it won't serve U.S. beef, saying U.S. meat processing is insufficient to protect consumers against mad cow disease.

Even though the Japanese government announced Monday it will resume North American beef imports after a two-year ban, the Sukiya restaurant chain, which serves bowls of rice covered with seasoned beef, will continue using Australian beef, the Asahi Shimbun reported.

"Japanese consumers are demanding all the cattle be tested, but U.S. cattle won't be," said an official of Zensho Inc., owner of the Sukiya chain. "We can't say the safety of U.S. beef has been secured."

In November, Japan Today reported that Zensho President Kentaro Ogawa had personally inspected U.S. meat processing plants. Ogawa said that U.S. meat processing plants do not incinerate cows' brains or other parts that are of high risk of carrying bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

"We want the U.S. to prove and explain to Japanese consumers that there is no cow infected with the disease. The proof for safety is the responsibility of the producer," Zensho said in a press release posted on its Web site.
 

Sandhusker

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~SH~ said:
Mike: "Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?"

No! Japan set the 20 month threshold, we didn't!



~SH~

But when Japan was asking for testing, you were against it, one of the reasons you stated was that it would "set a dangerous precident". :roll:
 
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Sandbag: "But when Japan was asking for testing, you were against it, one of the reasons you stated was that it would "set a dangerous precident"."

Where is your proof that the Japanese government would have allowed BSE tested imported beef on cattle under 24 months of age which would not reveal prions in cattle under 24 month of age?

BSE Tests that will not reveal prions in cattle under 24 months of age being used on cattle under 24 months of age is consumer fraud pure and simple.

You have offered no proof that the Japanese government would have even allowed it. Another of your empty arguments.



~SH~
 

Sandhusker

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~SH~ said:
Sandbag: "But when Japan was asking for testing, you were against it, one of the reasons you stated was that it would "set a dangerous precident"."

Where is your proof that the Japanese government would have allowed BSE tested imported beef on cattle under 24 months of age which would not reveal prions in cattle under 24 month of age?

BSE Tests that will not reveal prions in cattle under 24 months of age being used on cattle under 24 months of age is consumer fraud pure and simple.

You have offered no proof that the Japanese government would have even allowed it. Another of your empty arguments.



~SH~

Are you denying you made that comment?
 
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Where is your proof that the Japanese government would have allowed BSE tested imported beef on cattle under 24 months of age which would not reveal prions in cattle under 24 month of age?


~SH~
 

mrj

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Jason said:
Agman, does the US have a way to satisfy Japan with 20 month cattle?

Canada has a system in place tied to the ID tags. Is the carcass evaluation accurate enough to tell 20 months? Or is that a different age?

I could possibly see Canada getting cattle to Japan sooner than the US if the Canadian ID tags are the ones to meet the requirements.

Whatever, it is good news for all producers, both sides of the 49th.

Cull cows passed 50 cents here last week, calves remain strong, fats are still climbing slowly.


Jason, there have been individual US cattle producers identifying and age verifying their cattle for years. My guess is that the Japanese leaders who came here to verify our systems learned about that before the decision to open to US beef was made. Obvoiusly, some US producers were ready ahead of time to be able to send finished beef as soon as next week. Good for them! Hopefully, the emotion will take a back seat to reality, and yes, sound science, on this issue that didn't need to be.

MRJ
 

Silver

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Oldtimer said:
Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.

Be interesting to see what Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc agree to for age...

Then what do we tell US consumers when we are importing 30 month from a country with a higher rate of BSE... :???:

Tell them it's okay, Oldtimer, that the US system will hopefully someday be as adept at finding bse as the countries they import from. That, and that if it's good enough for the Japanese it must be good enough for the US.
 
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Silver said:
Oldtimer said:
Mike said:
Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?

Be interesting to see what Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc agree to for age...

Then what do we tell US consumers when we are importing 30 month from a country with a higher rate of BSE... :???:

Tell them it's okay, Oldtimer, that the US system will hopefully someday be as adept at finding bse as the countries they import from. That, and that if it's good enough for the Japanese it must be good enough for the US.

Thats the problem Silver-- US consumers have to eat unlabeled under THIRTY month Canadian beef, while the US will provide Japan only under TWENTY month old beef..... :???:

Both supposedly based on sound science? No wonder consumers might question if USDA is really making scientific driven decisions-- or are they driven by the "sound science" of economics?.......
 

Silver

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Oldtimer, the fact that the US discriminates against OTM from Canada is all I see of your "sound science" of economics. Economics is the only reason the border was closed for more that a few short months anyway.
 
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Thats the problem Silver-- US consumers have to eat unlabeled under THIRTY month Canadian beef, while the US will provide Japan only under TWENTY month old beef.....

Both supposedly based on sound science? No wonder consumers might question if USDA is really making scientific driven decisions-- or are they driven by the "sound science" of economics?.......

The 20 month criteria is Japan's criteria, not ours.

What the hell are we supposed to do OT? Tell Japan that they should either take all of our beef or none because their 20 month criteria is not based on sound science? HOW STUPID WOULD THAT BE????

By agreeing to export under 20 month old beef to Japan, WHICH MOST OF IT IS ANYWAY, we are hardly altering sound science. Just because we abide by Japan's criteria does not mean we agree with it. Our science hasn't changed. To the contrary, Japan has seen things our way.

This is such a ridiculous argument proving the depth of your desperation to find something to blame USDA for.

What percentage of what we import from Canada is between 20 and 30 months of age??? I'll bet a very insignificant amount futher detracting from your stupid "double standard" argument.

Your labeling law is a joke because most consumers would never see foreign beef labeled and the law is unenforceable. Something a former law dog should understand. Must have been a Barney Fife type huh? "M" COOL is a typical SYMBOLISM OVER SUBSTANCE - I CAN'T THINK FOR MYSELF classic R-CULT position. MEANINGLESS!



~SH~
 

Bill

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Oldtimer said:
Mike said:
"Japan's action today sets an excellent example for other countries in Asia whose markets remain closed. Now is the time for Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore and others to open their markets to U.S. beef. I urge all countries to take a science-based approach and adopt OIE standards for allowing beef trade from 30-month animals.


Might we have set a precedence here for 20 month old animals?




Under the agreement announced today, the United States is able to export beef from cattle 20 months of age and younger to Japan.

Be interesting to see what Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc agree to for age...

Then what do we tell US consumers when we are importing 30 month from a country with a higher rate of BSE... :???:

Hong Kong has been taking Canadian beef since Nov. 2004.

Hong Kong Livestock and Products Annual - September 2005
By USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service - This article provides the pork industry data from the USDA FAS Livestock and Products Annual 2005 report for Hong Kong. A link to the full report is also provided. The full report includes all the tabular data which we have omitted from this article.


Report Highlights:
It is estimated that Hong Kong’s ban on U.S. beef for the past 20 months has resulted in $136 million loss in U.S. export sales. Subsequent to the lifting of the ban in November last year, Canadian beef exports to Hong Kong have soared in the first half -year of 2005 with market share expanding to 21 percent. The market however still has a strong preference for quality U.S. beef. Canadian and Australian beef merely took up about 60 to 70 percent of the market demand. Beef imports are forecast to experience a modest rise of 5 percent in 2006 once U.S. beef is allowed entry again.

Situation and Outlook
Hong Kong has a domestic market of $149 million of beef products and $14.5 million of live cattle. If re-exports ($13 million) and offal trade are included, the entire market is about $304 million. (Hong Kong’s total offal imports in 2004 amounted to $127 million, $64 million of which were re-exported).

The U.S. used to be the largest supplier of beef products, occupying a market share of 44 percent in 2003. Hong Kong’s ban on U.S. beef since December 2003 was estimated to have resulted in $136 million loss in U.S. beef exports. The U.S. Department of Agriculture through Agricultural Trade Office in Hong Kong has been working very closely with the Hong Kong government trying to re-open the market for U.S. beef. The Hong Kong government had conducted a technical visit to the U.S. in June 2005 to review the U.S. BSE monitoring and surveillance programs, but the report has not yet be released.

Given the affluence of the Hong Kong economy and the abundance of upscale restaurants, there is always a demand for quality beef. Hong Kong’s beef imports for 2006 are forecast to increase by 5 percent based on the assumption that U.S. beef will return to Hong Kong. Canadian beef imports to Hong Kong were resumed in November 2004. Canadian beef supplies have soared since then. Its market share jumped from 2 percent in 2002 before it was banned in Hong Kong to 21 percent in the first half of 2005. Canada now become the second largest supplier of beef in terms of value. Canadian beef has taken up the largest portion of the U.S. share of the market. Australian beef, though being a popular substitute for U.S. beef, is not sufficiently abundant.
Hong Kong has a domestic market of $353 million for pork products in addition to $288 million market for live pigs. If pork re-exports ($54 million) and offal imports ($158 million) are included, the entire pork market in Hong Kong is estimated at $853 million. (Of the $158 million worth offals imported to Hong Kong in 2004, $135 million were exported.) U.S. exported $6.4 million and $3.9 million of pork products and offals to Hong Kong respectively in the first half year of 2005. Processed pork is the biggest category of U.S. pork exports to Hong Kong (excluding offals). U.S. pork loins are regarded as expensive items and are supplied at upscale outlets.

China is the largest pork supplier for the Hong Kong market. The human Streptococcus suis infection cases in China’s Sichuan province reported in Hong Kong in late July had a transient negative effect on Hong Kong’s pork consumption and trade. China’s frozen pork exports from Sichuan Province, a major pork exporting province, were suspended for about a month starting late July.

Hong Kong has a rather stable pork market. However, the market still fluctuates with prices. The average pork prices in the January – June 2005 rose by 21 percent. The price effects together with the Streptococcus suis incident are expected to cause pork imports in 2005 to decline to 250,000 MT.

In the coming years, it is expected that the consumption share of fresh meats will continue to decline while that of chilled/frozen meats will rise. Consumers increasingly get used to chilled/frozen products over the years. They value the convenience, hygiene and economical factors that chilled/frozen products offer.

On the production side, the Hong Kong government is gauging the response from farm operators about the introduction of a voluntary license surrender scheme. Given the pollution problems and transmission risk of the potentially deadly Japanese encephalitis virus from pigs to humans via mosquitoes, the Hong Kong government is considering to buy out the operation rights of farm licensee holders. Consequently, the local production of pigs is expected to decline in the future.
 

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