• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

JPN beef buyers in US

Help Support Ranchers.net:

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
JPN beef buyers in US



Japan buyers' visits brings mixed reaction on safety of U.S. beef

By Mike McGinnis

Agriculture Online Markets Editor

11/22/2005



Just as its consumers remain split on the safety of U.S. beef, Japanese buyers have differing opinions even after visiting U.S. cattle operations recently. Meanwhile, the indecision keeps U.S. cattle producers frustrated.



The conflicting reports whether U.S. beef will be welcomed back into Japan follow some beef buyers' visits last week.



Yoshi Tsuchiya, of IMI Global, a company that provides an animal tracking system used in the U.S., brought representatives from ICREST, an international beef supplier, and some of its customers, Hioaki Ota and Kubota companies, to Missouri to learn about the safety of U.S. beef.



After touring a livestock market in Bowling Green, Missouri, representatives from the Japan beef buying companies said they feel more comfortable with the safety of U.S. beef, according to Tsuchiya.



"They (Japan buyer's) are happy to see some of the U.S. farmers with age-verified systems. This will show the Japanese end-users and consumers that U.S. farmers are doing a lot for safety. "They plan to take their message back to the Japanese food service businesses and consumers," Tsuchiya said.



Because a majority of Japanese consumers remained concern about U.S. beef, it's important the message of safe quality meat gets back to the consumers of Japan, Tsuchiya said.



Meanwhile, following a visit to the U.S., Zensho Co officials, operator of the Sukiya chain of restaurants, announced last week it would not use U.S. beef even after Japan has lifted its import ban.



Because brains and other specified risk materials, regarded as likely to be infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, are not incinerated at U.S. plants, Zensho Co officials remain skeptical of the safety of U.S. beef, according to a Tokyo news report last week.



"These companies are saying no right now, but eventually Japanese companies are going to have to turn to U.S. beef because Australia can't continue to be the only major supplier in Japan," Tsuchiya said.



Tsuchiya added, "Around the world, there is only one place without foot-and-mouth disease that can be a major beef supplier and that is the United States."



Yoshinoya, the other major Japan beef company the media reports on, has maintained its allegiance to U.S. beef since the border closed two years ago.



According to Tsuchiya, a recent poll conducted by Nikkei Shimbun, a major Japanese newspaper, found 60% of food companies would use U.S. beef within six months.



The food companies included a caveat with their agreement to using U.S. beef. Proof from the U.S. producer or meatpacker of the safety of the product beyond U.S. government certification would be requested, so that Japanese companies may use the effort as a marketing tool to give confidence to consumers.



Meanwhile, when asked what confidence they had in the Japan border re-opening to U.S. beef, a few cattle producers visiting the www.AgricultureOnline.com website responded with frustration.



"If the futures market takes a big jump up on expectation of Japans trade, sell the contracts because Japan will never import even close to the amount of beef they did before the border was closed," one website visitor said.



Another cattle producer said with Japan reporting more mad cow cases, South America dealing with foot-and-mouth disease, and Australia pushing more kangaroo meat, the U.S. is looking like the only choice for beef buyers that want confidence in a safe product.



"Will our markets go up because of their acceptance, probably very little due to the 20 month rule," one Agriculture Online website visitor posted. "If the USDA would have let Creekstone Farms Inc. do their inspection deal with the Japanese, we possibly could have had 100% Asian nations back by now."




agriculture.com
 

PORKER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan-Florida
Yoshi Tsuchiya, of IMI Global, These companies are saying no right now, but eventually Japanese companies are going to have to turn to U.S. beef because Australia can't continue to be the only major supplier in Japan," Tsuchiya said. "Will our markets go up because of their acceptance, probably very little due to the 20 month rule," one Agriculture Online website visitor posted. "If the USDA would have let Creekstone Farms Inc. do their inspection deal with the Japanese, we possibly could have had 100% Asian nations back by now."

Proof from the U.S. producer or meatpacker of the safety of the product beyond U.S. government certification would be requested, so that Japanese companies may use the effort as a marketing tool to give confidence to consumers.THE BIG STATEMENT

UNLESS , Tsuchiya added, "Around the world, there is only one place without foot-and-mouth disease that can be a major beef supplier and that is the United States." WRONG Their are many beef shippers in the world that don't have BSE or FM.

Meanwhile, following a visit to the U.S., Zensho Co officials, operator of the Sukiya chain of restaurants, announced last week it would not use U.S. beef even after Japan has lifted its import ban. They need more than age verification to buy beef.
 

Latest posts

Top