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July 18, 2011

Soapweed

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Gathering some bulls in the cool of the day

Sunflower is one of my accomplices

Stringing them along

Sunflower and Goose

Peach hit the far corners of the "roughly" (used both figuratively and lliterally) thousand acre pasture.

Kosmo bringing three more

Of course they aren't cooperating as well as they could.

So Kosmo gets a bit damp getting them turned

With the help of a few portable corral panels along a fence, we first loaded the eleven bulls on our trailer. Big Swede is going
to use these bulls on his heifers for the next month. They have been with our heifers since the 16th of May (a little more than sixty days).
He backed his trailer up to ours, and the transfer was made.

Putting in a barrier to keep cattle from getting in the tank in this hot weather

We hauled some 16-foot wire panels to use for this project.

The poor old Kid got damp on this job, too. I happened to have my lace-up boot overshoes along. :wink:

Storm clouds on the horizon. They were actually over a hundred miles away, but the telephoto lens on the camera works pretty good.

Meanwhile, back in the hayfield

The Kosmo Kid is getting damp again because the air-conditioner is not working in that tractor.
 

High Plains

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Seeing the photo of Kosmo and his pony in the water brings to mind a question. As a kid in the mountain country I could generally count on good, hard footing where there was running water in a creek. If there was very little water standing in a flat piece of ground then you'd better watch for boggy conditions. I have crossed water a number of times horseback in places in Nebraska and it seems like it's hard to tell if the bottom of a creek is going to be real soft or hard. Makes me nervous. Sounds like a greenhorn question, but I'm wondering how a cowboy goes with confidence in a situation such as the one Kosmo was in. How does a feller know if he can't readily see rock or other tell-tale signs that it's good footing? Just something I've always wondered and never trusted until I was on the other side. :lol:
 

DustDevil

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High Plains said:
Seeing the photo of Kosmo and his pony in the water brings to mind a question. As a kid in the mountain country I could generally count on good, hard footing where there was running water in a creek. If there was very little water standing in a flat piece of ground then you'd better watch for boggy conditions. I have crossed water a number of times horseback in places in Nebraska and it seems like it's hard to tell if the bottom of a creek is going to be real soft or hard. Makes me nervous. Sounds like a greenhorn question, but I'm wondering how a cowboy goes with confidence in a situation such as the one Kosmo was in. How does a feller know if he can't readily see rock or other tell-tale signs that it's good footing? Just something I've always wondered and never trusted until I was on the other side. :lol:

This is a hydrological and geological problem whose solution is often derived by field testing and experimentation It is not advisable to undertake without forming a hypothesis that weighs risks against rewards
regarding H2O saturation of the conveyance and its payload.
 

High Plains

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Figures that a Gulf Coast resident would have a well-thought answer to a water question. :D The "field testing and experimentation" is sure the tricky part once in awhile. 8) "Weighing risk and rewards" is a big part of everyday life. :p
 

Soapweed

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DustDevil said:
This is a hydrological and geological problem whose solution is often derived by field testing and experimentation It is not advisable to undertake without forming a hypothesis that weighs risks against rewards
regarding H2O saturation of the conveyance and its payload.

Yes, what he said. :)

Most of the "potholes" out in the pasture are safe enough to ride through. It is some of the wet spots in the lower meadows that can be treacherous. Sometimes you can jump up and down in one place, and the ground wiggles for twenty feet. Those areas are good places to stay away from, whether on a horse or on a tractor. Some of these Sandhills hay meadows have legends where teams of horses and mowing machines fell in, never to get out again.

When I worked in Wyoming, there were Hereford cows grazing where we wrangled horses. If in doubt about a certain crossing, I've been guilty of find a Hereford cow to drive through first. If she made it across, I figured it would be safe for my horse and me. :wink:
 

MsSage

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DustDevil said:
High Plains said:
Seeing the photo of Kosmo and his pony in the water brings to mind a question. As a kid in the mountain country I could generally count on good, hard footing where there was running water in a creek. If there was very little water standing in a flat piece of ground then you'd better watch for boggy conditions. I have crossed water a number of times horseback in places in Nebraska and it seems like it's hard to tell if the bottom of a creek is going to be real soft or hard. Makes me nervous. Sounds like a greenhorn question, but I'm wondering how a cowboy goes with confidence in a situation such as the one Kosmo was in. How does a feller know if he can't readily see rock or other tell-tale signs that it's good footing? Just something I've always wondered and never trusted until I was on the other side. :lol:

This is a hydrological and geological problem whose solution is often derived by field testing and experimentation It is not advisable to undertake without forming a hypothesis that weighs risks against rewards
regarding H2O saturation of the conveyance and its payload.
So in other words.....Do you want a easy semi wet day or a LONG soaked day?
 

Cedarcreek

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Soapweed said:
DustDevil said:
This is a hydrological and geological problem whose solution is often derived by field testing and experimentation It is not advisable to undertake without forming a hypothesis that weighs risks against rewards
regarding H2O saturation of the conveyance and its payload.

Yes, what he said. :)

Most of the "potholes" out in the pasture are safe enough to ride through. It is some of the wet spots in the lower meadows that can be treacherous. Sometimes you can jump up and down in one place, and the ground wiggles for twenty feet. Those areas are good places to stay away from, whether on a horse or on a tractor. Some of these Sandhills hay meadows have legends where teams of horses and mowing machines fell in, never to get out again.

When I worked in Wyoming, there were Hereford cows grazing where we wrangled horses. If in doubt about a certain crossing, I've been guilty of find a Hereford cow to drive through first. If she made it across, I figured it would be safe for my horse and me. :wink:

Around here if there are cow tracks it's usually safe, no tracks means you better find another place. If they sink in very much I'll find another crossing. This spring with all the rain there were soft spots way up on the hills. Some of those were found by experimentation. :shock: :shock:
 

jodywy

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must be fun to move cows with out climbing moutains, fighting quakies, willows, fir and pine.....and were is the sage brush you miss that smell of sage after a rain...
 

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