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June 22, 2011

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Soapweed

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Kosmo Kid and a nice five-year-old buckskin gelding, purchased last fall

Trying to shut a gate in a mud puddle

It didn't work. :?

He is a gentle and smart little horse.

My steed for the day, a four-year-old

Kosmo Kid tying a wire onto the windmill shut-off

While I have the hard job of holding the horses. :wink:

Moving a bunch of cattle to a fresh pasture

Kosmo Kid keepin' 'em comin'

Hauling a tractor home from the repair shop, to get ready for haying
 

LazyWP

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You have more confidence in trailer tires then I do. You carry a spare rim and no tire. I carry 2 spare tires mounted, plus an extra unmounted tire. :mad: :lol:
 

Soapweed

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LazyWP said:
You have more confidence in trailer tires then I do. You carry a spare rim and no tire. I carry 2 spare tires mounted, plus an extra unmounted tire. :mad: :lol:

I wasn't going very far, and did have along my cell phone. :)

Usually I pull this with my old 1997 Ford F350 crew cab diesel, and there are three spare tires in the back of it. :wink:
 

gcreekrch

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Debbie says she's jealous of your buckskin Soap.

He is a dead ringer for a gelding she called Scooter when we were first going together. Scooter was a lot like the Energizer Bunny, he never quit.
 

Soapweed

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gcreekrch said:
Debbie says she's jealous of your buckskin Soap.

He is a dead ringer for a gelding she called Scooter when we were first going together. Scooter was a lot like the Energizer Bunny, he never quit.

The main reason I bought this horse is because he looks so much like my old Tom Cat horse did at that age, right down to the dorsal stripe, the stripes on his legs, and the "mustache" on his nose. Tom Cat was the best horse I've ever owned, and he is still going strong as a kid horse even though he turned 29 years old this spring.
 

Faster horses

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Nice horses, beautiful day and lots of GREEN grass.
Ain't life grand? That is one special looking buckskin.
Katrina told me that was her favorite horse out of that
whole sale!

One question. Why does Kosmo have so many pads under
his saddle that the saddle looks like it is tipped forward in front?
Just curious... :D
 

Shortgrass

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Soapweed said:
gcreekrch said:
Debbie says she's jealous of your buckskin Soap.

He is a dead ringer for a gelding she called Scooter when we were first going together. Scooter was a lot like the Energizer Bunny, he never quit.

The main reason I bought this horse is because he looks so much like my old Tom Cat horse did at that age, right down to the dorsal stripe, the stripes on his legs, and the "mustache" on his nose. Tom Cat was the best horse I've ever owned, and he is still going strong as a kid horse even though he turned 29 years old this spring.

My ol' Doc horse is 29 and going strong as a kids horse also. We were branding straglers a couple of weeks ago, and the 6 year old boy, Haden, was lagging behind. His dad was telling him to spur a little and catch up. I told his dad that someday when the cowboy is 29 and the horse is 6 he won't have to worry about Haden keeping up! Great kid on a good ol' pony is hard to beat.
 

Soapweed

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Faster horses said:
Nice horses, beautiful day and lots of GREEN grass.
Ain't life grand? That is one special looking buckskin.
Katrina told me that was her favorite horse out of that
whole sale!

One question. Why does Kosmo have so many pads under
his saddle that the saddle looks like it is tipped forward in front?
Just curious... :D

The one and only problem with this horse is that he is mutton withered. Kosmo's cinch was almost too long even with the double pad. He'd have had to tie a knot in it otherwise. :wink: (Folks, don't try that at home.) Even with the double pad, it should be even all the way across. :)
 

Faster horses

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I figured he had a reason, that's why I asked.
Sometimes with mutton withered horses, less pad might be better.

It seems harder and harder to find horses with good withers
anymore. Have you noticed that?

BTW, your sorrell is looking nice too. And I bet he has some
wither... :D
 

Big Muddy rancher

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They do sell cinches in various lengths. :wink: :D

One thing I learned from Len Brown of Ortho Flex saddles is fitting and leveling your saddle. I ride a Shimon saddle and it seems wide so I usually ride with 2 pads. The bottom one a felt or fleece and the top is a customized Ralph Shimon that has a wedge shaped piece glued on top. Works great for leveling my saddle.
If your saddle is down in front like Kosmo's it puts you ahead of the horse and if it's high in the front it puts you behind. Even a folded Navajo on the top front half of another pad will help level a saddle.
The other day my son saddled my horse and as I was putting on the bridle I noticed the saddle was down in front. Snickers has a pretty good set of withers and the saddle was close to bumping them. I unsaddled and put my other pad on right away. :D
 

alacowman

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nice pic's... like the buckskin real well,, and his saddle... is that a modified association tree its built on??
 

Soapweed

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alacowman said:
nice pic's... like the buckskin real well,, and his saddle... is that a modified association tree its built on??

I'm not sure what kind of tree Kosmo's saddle has. The saddlemaker had a booth at Old West Days quite a few years ago, and the saddle was purchased there. It is well-made and comfortable.
Back a long time ago when I was a kid, we were trailing cattle on a three day drive to our summer pasture. We hadn't planned on camping out, but the weather was so nice that three of us twelve-year-old-boys and Dad's hired man (who was eighteen years old) decided to sleep out under the stars anyway. My dad, mother, and sisters took the pickup back home, as there were chores to do. None of us camper-outers had bedrolls; all we had was two tarps that were behind the seat in the pickup and our saddle blankets for covers. We laid one tarp down on the bottom for all four of us to lay on, and then put the saddle blankets on next for a bit of warmth. The biggest tarp was placed on the very top. Our saddles served as pillows, for that was how they did it in the movies. :wink:

The first half of that May night was balmy and nice, but about midnight the wind came up as a cold front blew through. We were in a tree grove, so we got up and built a fire so we could get warm. (The eighteen-year-old was a cigarette smoker, so had matches.) I learned one lesson quite well, as I had a double Navajo blanket so stayed warmer than the poor guys that only had a saddle pad covering half their body.

Since that time I have always used a saddle pad with a double Navajo woven blanket on top. I've never sored a horse with this method, and on high-withered horses, there is always enough pad to not make the withers sore. Hopefully I'll never get caught out at night with no bed, but at least I'll be kind of prepared if the occasion happens.

Other items that I always carry on my saddle are a lariat rope, a piggin' string, fence pliers, and a pair of hobbles. Without any of these items in their proper place, I almost feel as if I'm riding "nekkid." Old habits die hard. :)

As a young man, my dad spent a night burrowed in a haystack. He said that was a cold experience and he thought that long night would never end. He didn't have a choice, though, being lost and a long way from home. At least his horse kept him company. :wink:
 

Faster horses

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That's our choice too, Soapweed.
A pad (not too thick) and a navajo blanket over the top.
Seems that combination works pretty well.

I was surprised to learn a few years back that too much
padding on a horse causes the saddle to move too much
and makes for a sore-backed horse. We knew an old team
roper who learned this the hard way. He had a high withered
horse and instead of getting a cut-back pad to use under
a navajo, I don't know how many pads he used, but he was
unable to cinch that saddle very tight so it had a lot of movement.
Soon he had a sore-backed horse that didn't want to pull
a steer anywhere.
 

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