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Law Firms Capitalize On Buying DOJ Talent for Uber Rich Clie

Tex

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http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2011/01/17/white-case-lands-top-fraud-prosecutor/


By Dionne Searcey

Update, 1/18, 5:15 EST:

Another SFO official has landed at a top American firm. Covington & Burling has announced they hired Robert Amaee in its London office. Amaee is the former head of the Anti-Corruption and Proceeds of Crime Units at the Serious Fraud Office in the United Kingdom.

Amaee’s new colleagues include two former senior officials from DOJ who came to the firm in recent months − Steven Fagell, who served as deputy chief of staff and counselor to the Assistant Attorney General overseeing the Criminal Division and James Garland, who served as deputy chief of staff and counselor to the U.S. Attorney General.



One of the biggest things on the minds of corporate counsels is just how much the U.K. Bribery Act will upend compliance programs and generally affect business overseas when the law takes effect in April.

The Act, which some people are calling the FCPA on steroids, is similar to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in that it bans overseas bribery but does so in less than black and white manner. Speculation over those gray areas are what keeps CEOs up at night, and has led to a burgeoning business for law firms, compliance consultants and others.

Many law firms have tried to gain an advantage for their clients by picking off former Justice Department officials. Last year Paul Weiss scored a coup by picking up Mark Mendelsohn, who presided over the FCPA crackdown for DOJ.

Today, White & Case is announcing it has hired Charlie Monteith, the number 2 official in Britain’s Serious Fraud Office, which is in charge of prosecuting crimes under the new Bribery Act.

Monteith, who will work in White & Case’s London office, was the key architect of the Bribery Act, according to the firm. During his tenure in the SFO Monteith participated in some of the most high-profile crime enforcements in Britain including prosecuting oil-for-food crimes and bribery cases involving BAE. He also contributed to the OECD convention guidance on how to prevent bribery.

Other luminaries at White & Case include former deputy attorney general George Terwilliger. “Charlie Monteith keeps us on the leading edge of global white collar capability for our clients,” Terwilliger said.

Among Monteith’s honors was one we found particularly noteworthy: last July he was invited to the Queen’s Garden Party in recognition of his work on the Bribery Act. Top that, FCPA lawyers. [End of post.]
 

Tex

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nenmrancher said:
What does this have to do with your anti-packer rants or the price of tea in China?

The competence of the regulatory agencies is constantly being undermined by their talent being bought by industry they are supposed to be regulating or enforcing the laws against them when they break those laws.

It is like having an army in Iraq and all the generals jump ship to work for the ones they are supposed to be instituting the rule of law against.

Tex
 

nenmrancher

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Considering that the article had nothing what so ever to do with anything ag and not even anything with the US as the guy was hired to work in London, I think your stretching things to try and make a point that in this case is that is non-issue. IF the guy had been hired to do something in the states that would be different but they hired him to work outside the country so you know the whole comptence thing dont fly. Try again and maybe you can come up with something that has to do with the US.
 

Tex

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nenmrancher said:
Considering that the article had nothing what so ever to do with anything ag and not even anything with the US as the guy was hired to work in London, I think your stretching things to try and make a point that in this case is that is non-issue. IF the guy had been hired to do something in the states that would be different but they hired him to work outside the country so you know the whole comptence thing dont fly. Try again and maybe you can come up with something that has to do with the US.

Tyson got caught bribing Mexican officials to sell their meat products, got off with a fine of less than 1/2 of 1 percent of the sales during the period (close to a billion in sales), and we later find out that the top dog at the DOJ FCPA (Foreign Corrupt Practices Act) unit was hired by a law firm that was doing work for Tyson. In the deal none of Tyson's people received any real penalties.

Law firms brag about buying regulators, and give them hefty paychecks to undermine the regulatory agencies. Ex politicians do the same thing. They are hired to spin the story so that there is no accountability EVER.

I think that you have to stop having to be spoon fed nemrancher.

You might not ever graduate to whole food.



Tex
 

nenmrancher

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Yeah and you might stop sucking at the bottle and come back to earth and see things a little clearer with out pickling your brain and as you dry out all the black helicopters you keep seeing and screaming about will prob go away.
 

Tex

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nenmrancher said:
Yeah and you might stop sucking at the bottle and come back to earth and see things a little clearer with out pickling your brain and as you dry out all the black helicopters you keep seeing and screaming about will prob go away.


nemrancher, these uber rich are buying all the power they can to get away with breaking the law.

Just look at Wall Street and the banks and how they got Larry Summers to bail them out instead of liquidating them. The same thing happens in all the regulatory agencies who have power to cost industry money when industry breaks the rules.

This was but another example.

You can hide your head in the sand, but this is happening whether your ears are full of sand or not.

Tex
 

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