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Magnets for pain

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Faster horses

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Has anyone had experience using magnets for pain?

I have arthritis in my knees and foot and was taking Bextra and getting along pretty good...then they took Bextra off the market. Since then I have been having a lot of pain. I took Advil, but apparently not enough. (I was taking one, now I find should have been taking 12 a day!!) Anyhow, at the fair there was a booth selling magnets. These were mined from the ground, etc, etc. I did buy one for $15 and put it on my ankle.

Immediately I felt a tingling in my foot and later my foot got real hot feeling. But the pain was virtually gone. I hadn't been sleeping well at night, either, because of the pain. Last night I slept well and today I am so much better. I would say 90% better. It is nothing short of amazing.

The lady selling them said they increase blood flow. She has necklaces, wrist and ankle bracelets. I think I will go buy another one today. Heck, maybe she has headbands that will help memory :wink: . Do you suppose?

Just wondering if anyone had any experience similar to mine using magnets. It is almost too good to be true.
 

ranchwife

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FH---i bought the hubby a mattress pad (from Avon) that has little magnets inside....it's only about 3'x1', but it seemed to do the trick on his arthritic shoulder!!!! Now that he has torn the muscles in his back, i hope to see the same results...between the magnets, the steroids and the cortisone injections the doc did, I hope to see him back to his normal obnoxious, silly self soon!!! :wink:
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Faster horses said:
Has anyone had experience using magnets for pain?

I have arthritis in my knees and foot and was taking Bextra and getting along pretty good...then they took Bextra off the market. Since then I have been having a lot of pain. I took Advil, but apparently not enough. (I was taking one, now I find should have been taking 12 a day!!) Anyhow, at the fair there was a booth selling magnets. These were mined from the ground, etc, etc. I did buy one for $15 and put it on my ankle.

Immediately I felt a tingling in my foot and later my foot got real hot feeling. But the pain was virtually gone. I hadn't been sleeping well at night, either, because of the pain. Last night I slept well and today I am so much better. I would say 90% better. It is nothing short of amazing.

The lady selling them said they increase blood flow. She has necklaces, wrist and ankle bracelets. I think I will go buy another one today. Heck, maybe she has headbands that will help memory :wink: . Do you suppose?

Just wondering if anyone had any experience similar to mine using magnets. It is almost too good to be true.



Good thing I have had all the metal pins remove from my various bone breaks or I might have been attracted to you. Then the tongues would be wagging in Deadwood. :wink:
 

Maple Leaf Angus

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FH - as good a drug as ibuprofen is, there is a downside to high dosages of it. It is known to be very hard on the kidneys at high levels of usage.

Two of my aquaintances have found this out the hard way, with the one nearly destroying his kidneys as a result.

But it is a good drug if not over-used.

Best wishes for your relief from pain. It is not a funny matter.
 

ranchwife

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Faster horses said:
ranchwife, since you are a nurse, are you saying there is something to magnets easing pain? I mean from a medical standpoint?

Absolutely!!! Not sure "why", but i know of several practitioners who recommend magnet therapy in conjunction with traditional medicine!! Best of luck!!!
 
A

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FH- The radiologist my wife works with swears by them too- he got my wife to wearing a bracelet just lately and she claims its helping and is now trying to get me to wear magnetic jewelry too......
 

Faster horses

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I have it from a good source that the glucosimine-chondrotin is much better utilized if it also contains MSM.

Back to the magnets, I got along virtually painless today. It is too good to be true!! Just to be on the safe side, I plan to get one for my right ankle as well.

P.S. Thanks, Maple Leaf, for the 'heads up' on the ibuprofen. I will tell my daughter who has been taking 12 a day for some time. What do you recommend as the proper dosage?
 

PPRM

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I have some cutout to put in my shoes, I otice if they aren't there,

PPRM
 

Maple Leaf Angus

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FH - I sure would be the last one you would ask the question for the right answer. All I know is that an aquaintance from Indiana was taking "high dosages" of Advil to relieve long-term pain from a back injury and it was given as the cause of his kidney failure. Ended up on dialysis and receiving a kidney from his sister. An older lady from our church suffers from arthritis and was taking quite a lot and was told by her doctor that it was contributing to kidney problems.
My sister, a nurse, is very supportive of its use, but only by the label rates.

I guess it's like everything else, good in the right amounts. There must be some medical types on here who know more about this than I do. Where are you doc? or nurses?

Someone said that "the dose is the poison". . .
 

ranchwife

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Maple Leaf Angus said:
FH - I sure would be the last one you would ask the question for the right answer. All I know is that an aquaintance from Indiana was taking "high dosages" of Advil to relieve long-term pain from a back injury and it was given as the cause of his kidney failure. Ended up on dialysis and receiving a kidney from his sister. An older lady from our church suffers from arthritis and was taking quite a lot and was told by her doctor that it was contributing to kidney problems.
My sister, a nurse, is very supportive of its use, but only by the label rates.

I guess it's like everything else, good in the right amounts. There must be some medical types on here who know more about this than I do. Where are you doc? or nurses?

Someone said that "the dose is the poison". . .

MLA---your sister is absolutely right....ONLY in the doses recommended on the back of the bottle...the same goes for acetaminophen (Tylenol)....which has been linked with liver failure!! One who drinks should never take acetaminophen to "avoid" the next day hang-over!! Neither should folks with hepatitis or cirrhosis!!! :shock: If anyone is having to take more than 800mg of ibuprofen more than 3 times a day, then there is more going on than meets the eye and should definately see a doctor!!!!
 

Juan

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E-MAIL STORY PRINTER FRIENDLY FOXFAN CENTRAL
Fast Facts: Painkiller Primer
Friday, August 19, 2005
By Michael W. Smith, MD


Confused about anti-inflammatory drugs? The latest update about arthritis drugs and painkillers has even surprised and bewildered arthritis specialists. Here's the down-and-dirty version of what you need to know.

Bextra

—Bextra was pulled from the market because the FDA says that risks from Bextra outweigh the benefits.

—The FDA says Bextra offers no advantages over other available anti-inflammatory drugs.

—Risks from Bextra include an increase in heart attacks and strokes as well as the potential for life-threatening skin reactions.

—Patients should contact their doctor about choosing another treatment.

Celebrex

—Unlike Bextra, the FDA says the benefits of Celebrex outweigh the risks.

—Celebrex is associated with an increase in heart attacks and strokes, particularly at doses higher than 200 milligrams a day.

—Celebrex will carry a black box warning about the risks of heart attack, stroke, and stomach ulcer bleeding.

—Patients should use the lowest effective dose for the shortest time possible.

—More research is being done to study any potential long-term effects of Celebrex.

Vioxx

—In February, an expert panel recommended that Vioxx be brought back on the market after it was removed in September 2004 because of its link to heart attacks and strokes.

—However, the FDA says much more safety information is needed before Vioxx would be allowed back on the market.

—Experts say once patients stopped taking Vioxx, any increase in heart attacks and strokes likely went away.

—On Friday, a Texas jury awarded a woman nearly a quarter-billion dollars in a lawsuit against Merck, the makers of Vioxx, over the death of her husband from a heart attack allegedly brought on by Vioxx.

Other Prescription Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

The FDA says all anti-inflammatory drugs carry a risk of heart attacks and strokes as well as the risk for potentially life-threatening stomach ulcer bleeding. These drugs should not be used in patients who have recently undergone heart bypass surgery. The FDA has provided a complete list of drugs affected by this update.

Over-the-Counter Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

—Short-term, low-dose use (the recommended over-the-counter dose) of over-the-counter painkillers does not appear to increase risk of heart attacks and strokes.

—More specific information about the potential for heart attack, stroke, and stomach ulcer bleeding will be included with these products.

—The exact risk of these drugs isn't known because there is very little research in this area.

—These drugs include products with ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen. The FDA has provided a list of brand names for these over-the-counter medications.

—Stronger reminders about limiting the dose and duration of treatment will be included. Previous recommendations have been to use these over-the-counter drugs for no more than 10 days without seeing your doctor.

—Like prescription anti-inflammatory drugs, over-the-counter drugs also carry the risk of skin reactions.

—Aspirin is not included in this new warning as it's known to decrease the risk of heart disease. —Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is also not included in this warning as it is not an anti-inflammatory drug. It should still be taken as directed because too much acetaminophen can lead to liver problems.

Who is at highest risk when taking these drugs?

—Patients who have had recent heart bypass surgery

—People with heart disease — blockages in their heart arteries — including people who have had chest pain or a heart attack

—People who have had a stroke or who currently have episodes known as TIA (transient ischemic attacks), sometimes called ministrokes

—People with a history of stomach ulcers

By Michael W. Smith, MD, reviewed by Charlotte E. Grayson, MD

SOURCE: FDA
 

ranchwife

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EXCELLENT info, Juan!! Thanks for posting this as we are all familiar with family, friends and loved ones who regularly take these meds!!! :)
 

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