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Making a good Cattle horse

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Jeannie

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Faster horses said:
...and a Paint horse must have at least one parent in the AQHA. Anyhow that is how it used to be. Now I think the book might be closed and the parents must both be registered Paints. But to start with, one parent must be registered.

I don't know about the 'must' part, but we have/had 4 horses whose mother is a registered quarter horse and father is a registered Paint that are registered with the APHA. Not that this matters, but I recently discovered that a registered Paint horse that is a solid color can only be shown in the breeder (I think that is what it's called) class. I thought that was interesting. Sorry for the rambling, it's late and I'm tired.
 

OldDog/NewTricks

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School Time for all of us

Paints

Paint's sire and dam must be registered with the American Paint Horse Association, the American Quarter Horse Association, or the Jockey Club (Thoroughbreds). To be eligible for the Regular Registry, the horse must also exhibit a minimum amount of white hair over unpigmented (pink) skin.

Each Paint Horse has a particular combination of white and any color of the equine spectrum: black, bay, brown, chestnut, dun, grullo, sorrel, palomino, buckskin, gray or roan.
Markings can be any shape or size, and located virtually anywhere on the Paint's body.
Although Paints come in a variety of colors with different markings, there are only three specific coat patterns: overo, tobiano and tovero.

Tobiano ?(pronounced: tow be yah' no)
In olden days 40’s and early 50’s these were “Pintos”
The “Cisco Kid” rode a Pinto

The dark color usually covers one or both flanks.
Generally, all four legs are white, at least below the hocks and knees.
Generally, the spots are regular and distinct as ovals or round patterns that extend down over the neck and chest, giving the appearance of a shield.
Head markings are like those of a solid-colored horse--solid, or with a blaze, strip, star or snip.
A tobiano may be either predominantly dark or white.
The tail is often two colors.

http://www.apha.com/breed/tobiano.html

Overo?(pronounced: oh vair' oh)
In olden day these were call “Paints”
We Old Timer used to call these “War Bonnett Paints

The white usually will not cross the back of the horse between its withers and its tail.
Generally, at least one and often all four legs are dark.
Generally, the white is irregular, and is rather scattered or splashy.
Head markings are distinctive, often bald-faced, apron-faced or bonnet-faced.
?An overo may be either predominantly dark or white.
The tail is usually one color.

http://www.apha.com/breed/overo.html


Tovero?(pronounced: tow vair' oh)
¿¿¿Where the Hell did these come from – in my time Oveo’s with white over the Loins Died???
Dark pigmentation around the ears, which may expand to cover the forehead and/or eyes.
One or both eyes blue.
Dark pigmentation around the mouth, which may extend up the sides of the face and form spots.
Chest spot(s) in varying sizes. These may also extend up the neck.
Flank spot(s) ranging in size. These are often accompanied by smaller spots that extend forward across the barrel, and up over the loin.
Spots, varying in size, at the base of the tail.

http://www.apha.com/breed/tovero.html

Back to Research – Never to old to learn
A friend and niabor “Buster Negglee was President of APHA in the 60’s
and I've had a few!
 

OldDog/NewTricks

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Take a look at these sites

http://www.apha.com/breed/geneticeq.html

Note:
At the whiter extreme, the frame overo pattern is responsible for lethal white foals. It is the pattern most closely associated with these foals.
Recent characterization of the gene involved in the lethal white foals has confirmed that the foals with two doses of the gene are white, and die soon after birth from gut innervation abnormalities. Horses with only one dose are frame overos, and survive.
This documentation is important for breeders of Paint Horses. With DNA tests now available for the frame gene (and the lethal white foals that can accompany it) it is possible to test breeding horses. Those with the gene can be mated to horses without it, resulting in about half frame and half nonspotted foals, but avoiding completely the production of lethal white foals.
Way past my bed time!
 

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