• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Montana Cattlemen's Association

Help Support Ranchers.net:

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Montana Cattlemen Outraged
USDA Moves to Close Montana Beef Processing Plants

Montana Cattlemens Association (MCA) announced today its outrage over the U.S. Department of Agricultures (USDA) targeting of Montana beef processing plants for enforcement actions or suspension of operations.

Two hundred carcasses hanging in cold storage at Ranchland Meats in Butte, MT have been impounded by FSIS Circuit Supervisor Dr. Jeffrey Legg. Many of those carcasses were 4-H market animal projects exhibited and sold at the local county fair. Other plants located in Beaverhead County, Columbus, and Missoula have also been targeted by FSIS.

MCA President, Dennis McDonald stated, "I am very concerned about the actions of USDA to close beef processing plants in Montana. The timing of this action is disturbing. We hope USDA is not taking this action in retribution for MCA, R-CALF USA and Governor Schweitzers recent actions to protect the Montana cow herd from Canadian bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Governor Schweitzer purchased a 4-H pig during the Lewis and Clark County Fair and that carcass is hanging at the Butte plant targeted for closure by USDA."

Brett Debruycker, MCA Vice-President, said he feels strongly the 4-H projects and other carcasses owned by individuals at the Butte plant are being held hostage by USDA. "These kids worked hard all year long on the 4-H market animal projects and made a significant financial investment," noted DeBruycker. "This thoughtless intervention by FSIS is unconscionable. What in the world has happened at USDA?"

McDonald noted that while MCA officials have attempted to contact Dr. Jeffrey Legg to discuss the actions taken, Legg is on vacation.

"It is particularly troubling that the official who conducted these inspections and issued the orders is conveniently on vacation when the information became public. The Butte plant has been left in limbo, not knowing whether business can be conducted or not while the FSIS official in charge is on vacation. Meanwhile, Montanas 4-H program has been a casualty of the agencys actions. MCA will work feverishly to obtain the answers as to why USDA has undertaken this action."

###
 

Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
2,066
Reaction score
0
Location
GWN
Looks like mouse crap in the cooler and maybe an 'ol boy inspector who got caught looking the other way. I guess rodent crap is alright to have in meat coolers in R-Calfs eyes.

Cattlemen's group claims USDA trying to close state's beef plants
By BECKY BOHRER
Associated Press

A Montana cattlemen's group accused the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday of trying to force the closure of federally inspected beef processing plants in the state, a claim an agency spokeswoman said was untrue.

"Our agency runs on the letter of the law, and everyone is treated the same -- small, medium, large, very small," regardless of the plant's location, said Amanda Eamich, a spokeswoman with USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service.

USDA temporarily shut down Ranchland Packing Co., a slaughter and processing plant in Butte, after an inspector last week found what Eamich described as unsanitary conditions, including some rodent droppings.


But Dennis McDonald, president of the Montana Cattlemen's Association and chairman of the state Democratic Party, called the timing of that action and enforcement at other plants "disturbing." He suggested they may be tied to efforts by cattle producers in this state to block the federal government's resumption of cattle trade with Canada, a country that has confirmed three cases of mad cow disease since May 2003.

McDonald is also a member of R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, the ranchers' group that sued in federal court in Billings to prevent cattle and expanded beef trade with Canada. The Montana Cattlemen's Association supported that action.

"If you line up the dots, it's pretty obvious what's happened," McDonald said. The Montana Cattlemen's Association claims USDA is targeting small plants for "enforcement actions or suspension of operations" that would lead to closure.

Eamich said the allegations are groundless. She said that in the past 60 days, federal officials took action against two plants in the state and that each plant's owners were informed of their rights -- including their rights to appeal.

Gary Wold, who owns Ranchland Packing, said Tuesday that he feels he was targeted, but doesn't know why. He acknowledges mice droppings and cobwebs were found in his facility, but said they were not in places where any processing work was done. He said some droppings were found in a corner of a cooler where meat was kept. He noted that in over 30 years of business, he's never had a food safety violation and believes he has taken adequate steps to address USDA's concerns.

The state Livestock Department says Montana has 29 federally inspected slaughter and/or processing plants, many of them very small. Each facility needs a federal inspector on hand to monitor the work.

Rick Parks, an investigator for the Government Accountability Project, a private organization that represents "whistleblowers," said he has been working the past two years with small, federally inspected plants in the state who believe they have been targeted or held to a higher standards than larger plants.

GAP is representing John Munsell, a former Miles City meat processor who has sued USDA for allegedly retaliating against him for criticizing its food protection efforts.

Parks said he believes there is credence to the assertions of the Montana Cattlemen's Association.

"It does appear on the surface that USDA has an ax to grind with Montana, and they're doing the best they can to sharpen it up," he said.

However, he could only speculate on the possible reasons.

Wold said that despite having a federal inspector at his plant for years, the issues there were only recently brought up by a circuit supervisor.
Eamich said all action taken by agency personnel are supported by regulations and that the same standards are applied to every facility.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Bill said:
Looks like mouse crap in the cooler and maybe an 'ol boy inspector who got caught looking the other way. I guess rodent crap is alright to have in meat coolers in R-Calfs eyes.

Cattlemen's group claims USDA trying to close state's beef plants
By BECKY BOHRER
Associated Press

A Montana cattlemen's group accused the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday of trying to force the closure of federally inspected beef processing plants in the state, a claim an agency spokeswoman said was untrue.

"Our agency runs on the letter of the law, and everyone is treated the same -- small, medium, large, very small," regardless of the plant's location, said Amanda Eamich, a spokeswoman with USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service.

USDA temporarily shut down Ranchland Packing Co., a slaughter and processing plant in Butte, after an inspector last week found what Eamich described as unsanitary conditions, including some rodent droppings.


But Dennis McDonald, president of the Montana Cattlemen's Association and chairman of the state Democratic Party, called the timing of that action and enforcement at other plants "disturbing." He suggested they may be tied to efforts by cattle producers in this state to block the federal government's resumption of cattle trade with Canada, a country that has confirmed three cases of mad cow disease since May 2003.

McDonald is also a member of R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, the ranchers' group that sued in federal court in Billings to prevent cattle and expanded beef trade with Canada. The Montana Cattlemen's Association supported that action.

"If you line up the dots, it's pretty obvious what's happened," McDonald said. The Montana Cattlemen's Association claims USDA is targeting small plants for "enforcement actions or suspension of operations" that would lead to closure.

Eamich said the allegations are groundless. She said that in the past 60 days, federal officials took action against two plants in the state and that each plant's owners were informed of their rights -- including their rights to appeal.

Gary Wold, who owns Ranchland Packing, said Tuesday that he feels he was targeted, but doesn't know why. He acknowledges mice droppings and cobwebs were found in his facility, but said they were not in places where any processing work was done. He said some droppings were found in a corner of a cooler where meat was kept. He noted that in over 30 years of business, he's never had a food safety violation and believes he has taken adequate steps to address USDA's concerns.

The state Livestock Department says Montana has 29 federally inspected slaughter and/or processing plants, many of them very small. Each facility needs a federal inspector on hand to monitor the work.

Rick Parks, an investigator for the Government Accountability Project, a private organization that represents "whistleblowers," said he has been working the past two years with small, federally inspected plants in the state who believe they have been targeted or held to a higher standards than larger plants.

GAP is representing John Munsell, a former Miles City meat processor who has sued USDA for allegedly retaliating against him for criticizing its food protection efforts.

Parks said he believes there is credence to the assertions of the Montana Cattlemen's Association.

"It does appear on the surface that USDA has an ax to grind with Montana, and they're doing the best they can to sharpen it up," he said.

However, he could only speculate on the possible reasons.

Wold said that despite having a federal inspector at his plant for years, the issues there were only recently brought up by a circuit supervisor.
Eamich said all action taken by agency personnel are supported by regulations and that the same standards are applied to every facility.

Which is worse- a little mouse crap in the corner-- or the Canadian workers pissing their pants online that all have AIDS :? :???: But USDA won't check on that :(
 

Mike

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
28,480
Reaction score
0
Location
Montgomery, Al
For those who visit the USDA cafeteria:
"At USDA, the Mouse Is in the House"
by Al Kamen
Wednesday, July 30, 2003

Employees at the Department of Agriculture's main cafeteria were just sitting down to lunch on Friday when security guards ordered everyone in the huge eatery to leave. Al Qaeda? Bomb scare? No. Mouse droppings. The D. C. Department of Health closed the cafeteria for failing to pass inspection. Yes, the USDA, home to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, the meat and poultry inspectors — the agency that is part of the federal system for protecting the nation's food supply, was in violation of the D. C. Health Code.

There were several citations, according to the inspection report, including: "water leaking excessively" in the ceiling, employees not wearing hair restraints, and inadequate cleaning of the inside of ice machines, cabinets, surfaces and equipment.

The biggest problem, however, seemed to be mouse droppings found everywhere — in the dry storage room, by the salad bar, behind the ovens, near the serving line, behind the soda machines. There were dead mice in one trap. The rodents can cause some serious diseases.
"These conditions make people sick," said Theodore J. Gordon, senior deputy director for environmental health science and regulation for the D. C. health department. "It's inexcusable for these conditions to be allowed," he said. "This is just basic sanitation. This is elbow grease — it doesn't cost money. People are entitled to safe food."

The cafeteria, which feeds many hundreds of employees each day for breakfast and lunch and afternoon noshes, is more important for employees at USDA than cafeterias at other agencies because there are few commercial alternatives nearby.

Officials moved over the weekend to make repairs, reinforcing barriers to any possible entrance for the critters and adding traps — none has been caught — and fixing the ceiling.

"We did take it extremely seriously," USDA spokeswoman Alisa Harrison said yesterday.

While this sort of thing hasn't happened in recent years, Harrison noted that the building is at 14th and Independence, not far from large grassy Mall areas."It's an issue that buildings in D. C. have to continually address," she said.

The inspectors returned Monday, pronounced everything much improved, and allowed the cafeteria to reopen.

Bon appetit!
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
I wonder from which state comes the the most pressure on the USDA to perform their duties properly, and then when they do, those same people cry foul. I know you can say Hypocritical, your RCALF was founded on the idea!

Look for the number on animals tested for BSE in Montana to increase also, that's what the majority of the Ranchers are calling for isn't it!
 

Grandad

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Messages
186
Reaction score
0
Location
Peace Country
I suspect that Oldtimers name is actually Richard Head. Those that know him just call him Dick.
 

Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
2,066
Reaction score
0
Location
GWN
Find a new page in the R-Calf Koran Oldtimer or just got tired of repeating the same old lies about Canadian beef?
 

SASH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
567
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Manitoba
Apparently mouse droppings can kill you if they come from the right kind of mice. There was a woman up here who died from cleaning up after she found mice droppings in her cupboard.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)


Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. HPS was first recognized in 1993 and has since been identified throughout the United States. Although rare, HPS is potentially deadly. Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
SASH said:
Apparently mouse droppings can kill you if they come from the right kind of mice. There was a woman up here who died from cleaning up after she found mice droppings in her cupboard.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)


Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. HPS was first recognized in 1993 and has since been identified throughout the United States. Although rare, HPS is potentially deadly. Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection.

Hantavirus has been around for 1000+ years and was believed brought to North America by the first Native Americans from Asia-- many more people than are reported are believed to have died prior to the discovery of the disease and were written off as pneumonia or other respiratory diseases....

And SASH you are right --Hantivirus can kill....

So can the diseases that AIDS infected persons are more susceptible and prone to have... Since it effects the immune system, during some stages in the disease they can be as much as 100 times more susceptible to diseases like tuberculosis, hepatitis , salmonellas, and staph infections and many other diseases caused by and transmitted by bacteria, virus's, and fungal spores....Which does not become that big a problem for the rest of the world with patients that seek diagnosis, treatment and remain under medical care to prevent and treat these diseases---but since AIDS is often found in the chemically dependent, functionally impaired, uneducated, migrant, and poor that do not even seek diagnosis, let alone treatment, it can become one......
 

SASH

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
567
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Manitoba
Oldtimer said:
SASH said:
Apparently mouse droppings can kill you if they come from the right kind of mice. There was a woman up here who died from cleaning up after she found mice droppings in her cupboard.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)


Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. HPS was first recognized in 1993 and has since been identified throughout the United States. Although rare, HPS is potentially deadly. Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection.

Hantavirus has been around for 1000+ years and was believed brought to North America by the first Native Americans from Asia-- many more people than are reported are believed to have died prior to the discovery of the disease and were written off as pneumonia or other respiratory diseases....

And SASH you are right --Hantivirus can kill....

So can the diseases that AIDS infected persons are more susceptible and prone to have... Since it effects the immune system, during some stages in the disease they can be as much as 100 times more susceptible to diseases like tuberculosis, hepatitis , salmonellas, and staph infections and many other diseases caused by and transmitted by bacteria, virus's, and fungal spores....Which does not become that big a problem for the rest of the world with patients that seek diagnosis, treatment and remain under medical care to prevent and treat these diseases---but since AIDS is often found in the chemically dependent, functionally impaired, uneducated, migrant, and poor that do not even seek diagnosis, let alone treatment, it can become one......

From what I understand, the AIDS virus will not survive outside of the human body for any length of time so by the time that meat is cut and wrapped, that virus will be long since dead.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
SASH said:
Oldtimer said:
SASH said:
Apparently mouse droppings can kill you if they come from the right kind of mice. There was a woman up here who died from cleaning up after she found mice droppings in her cupboard.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)


Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. HPS was first recognized in 1993 and has since been identified throughout the United States. Although rare, HPS is potentially deadly. Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection.

Hantavirus has been around for 1000+ years and was believed brought to North America by the first Native Americans from Asia-- many more people than are reported are believed to have died prior to the discovery of the disease and were written off as pneumonia or other respiratory diseases....

And SASH you are right --Hantivirus can kill....

So can the diseases that AIDS infected persons are more susceptible and prone to have... Since it effects the immune system, during some stages in the disease they can be as much as 100 times more susceptible to diseases like tuberculosis, hepatitis , salmonellas, and staph infections and many other diseases caused by and transmitted by bacteria, virus's, and fungal spores....Which does not become that big a problem for the rest of the world with patients that seek diagnosis, treatment and remain under medical care to prevent and treat these diseases---but since AIDS is often found in the chemically dependent, functionally impaired, uneducated, migrant, and poor that do not even seek diagnosis, let alone treatment, it can become one......

From what I understand, the AIDS virus will not survive outside of the human body for any length of time so by the time that meat is cut and wrapped, that virus will be long since dead.

True but it is all the diseases that go along with the AIDS infected persons... Diseases that they are as much as 100 times more susceptible to and that do live outside the body....

Have you ever been in a post mortem autopsy on a known HIV positive-- I have several times and before you can begin you dress up in what looks like a space suit- scrubs, gloves eyeshields...First time I questioned the one Pathologist on why I needed to put coverings over my boots since the boots would protect me from body fluids-- He explained that we were not only protecting ourselves from the HIV virus and the other diseases- but more importantly protecting the rest of the world from us packing all those possible diseases out- , since everything we wore was disposed of and incinerated....Those diseases that do survive outside the body....

I'm not talking about the Magic Johnson's of the world- the type that are under Doctors care-- I'm talking the migrant, drug user, skid row, immigrants and poor (AIDS has now been designated the worlds poor man disease)... These are the ones that if diagnosed often do nothing to prevent spread or to treat the disease- and do nothing to care for the diseases they get because of the breakdown of their immune system...The same type of people that would take low paying jobs cutting meat, cooking pizzas, or flipping burgers...

I'll be chastised as inhuman and unfeeling now- but I also see that a serious disease that we almost had eradicated- a disease we used to forcibly lock these same type people in hospitals to treat - tuberculosis- is now at near epidemic stages in some parts of the country...Leaves a lot of questions :? ......
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Northern Rancher said:
Now there's a man whose mastered the R-Calf shuffle-you old wingnut-trying to turn Montana Mouse s*** into Alberta Aids.

And neither one are very appetizing to the beef buying public...Be nice to know all the story and the true extent of both....
 

Murgen

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
I would like to commend the USDA on taking RCALF's advice and performing their duties like they should be.

Thank-you RCALF for bringing the USDA shortcomings to their attention! :D :D
 

rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,059
Reaction score
0
FOOD SAFETY
USDA shutters slaughterhouse for rodent infestation

by Pete Hisey on 8/10/2005 for Meatingplace.com


Ranchland Packing Co., a Butte, Mont., meatpacker, was closed by USDA inspectors who discovered an infestation of rodents and insects in the building.

The plant was ordered closed on Sunday, and the owners have until the end of the day Wednesday to prepare a plan to correct the situation. The company told the Associated Press that the infractions were minor and limited to the office areas and that the company has operated for over 30 years without a single food-safety complaint...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
This is another classic display of R-CULT hypocrisy.

In one breath they state the USDA has not gone far enough to assure the safety of our beef.

In the next breath they accuse USDA of having it out for the poor little Montana 4-H kids that are just trying to hang their carcasses in mouse dropping and cobwebs.

HAHAHAHA!

Bret Debruycker was the R-CULT director that went to Mexico and came back with all the horror stories about the packing plants in Mexico. Now he's defending mouse dropping and cobweb coolers.

HAHAHAHAHA!


These hypocrites get funnier and funnier to watch and listen to. They absolutely have no shame.



~SH~
 

rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,059
Reaction score
0
USDA may let meat plant reopen
Associated Press

HELENA - A Butte meat slaughtering and processing plant shut down on allegations of unsanitary conditions will be allowed to resume handling beef as soon as a simple cleaning procedure is completed, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., said Wednesday.

Baucus said Ranchland Packing Co. could be operating as soon as today.

The senator said he spoke Wednesday to Agriculture Undersecretary Richard Raymond and was told Ranchland could reopen after rubbing carcasses with a bleach solution, then rinsing them with water.


The USDA temporarily shut down Ranchland after an inspector last week found what spokeswoman Amanda Eamich described as unsanitary conditions, including some rodent droppings. Dennis McDonald, president of the Montana Cattlemen's Association and chairman of the state Democratic Party, said timing of the enforcement there and at other plants was "disturbing."

McDonald suggested a link to Montana cattle producers' efforts to block the federal government's resumption of cattle trade with Canada, which has confirmed three cases of mad cow disease since May 2003.

McDonald also is in R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, the ranchers' group that went to court with efforts to prevent cattle and expanded beef trade with Canada. The Montana Cattlemen's Association was supportive and claims the USDA targets small plants for enforcement leading to closure, allegations Eamich called groundless. She said USDA enforcement is based on "the letter of the law."

Asked Wednesday how the Ranchland closure was resolved so swiftly if USDA adhered that strictly to regulations and procedures, Baucus said, "That's a good question. I don't know."

Ranchland Packing owner Gary Wold said Tuesday that he believed he was targeted, but did not know why. Mice droppings and cobwebs were found in his facility, he said, but not in places where meat processing took place. Some droppings were in a corner of a cooler where meat was kept, Wold said, adding he believed he had taken proper steps to resolve USDA concerns.

Montana has 29 federally inspected meat processing plants, state officials said.

"If any other plants are about to be closed ... we'll take it on a case-by-case basis," Baucus said.
 

Latest posts

Top