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More Of The Liz Warren Lies

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Mike

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Gotta love those Dems that back up a lie with another fantastic lie! :lol: :lol:

Remind us of anyone? :wink:


The credibility of Massachusetts Democratic Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren took another hit today as Boston radio talk show host Howie Carr released evidence that appears to confirm Ms. Warren may have plagiarized at least three of the five recipes she submitted to the 1984 Pow Wow Chow cookbook edited by her cousin Candy Rowsey.

Two of the possibly plagiarized recipes, said in the Pow Wow Chow cookbook to have been passed down through generations of Oklahoma Native American members of the Cherokee tribe, are described in a New York Times News Service story as originating at Le Pavilion, a fabulously expensive French restaurant in Manhattan. The dishes were said to be particular favorites of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Cole Porter.

The two recipes, "Cold Omelets with Crab Meat" and "Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing," appear in an article titled “Cold Omelets with Crab Meat,” written by Pierre Franey of the New York Times News Service that was published in the August 22, 1979 edition of the Virgin Islands Daily News, a copy of which can be seen here.

Ms. Warren’s 1984 recipe for Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing is a word-for-word copy of Mr. Franey’s 1979 recipe.

Mrs. Warren’s 1984 recipe for Cold Omelets with Crab Meat contains all four of the ingredients listed in Mr. Franey’s 1979 recipe in the exact same portion but lists five additional ingredients. More significantly, her instructions are virtually a word for word copy of Mr. Franey’s instructions from this 1979 article. Both instructions specify the use of a “seven inch Teflon pan.” The 1984 Pow Wow Chow recipe reads:


Use a small omelet pan, or, preferably, a seven-inch Teflon pan. Heat about one-half teaspoon butter in the pan. Add about one-third cup of the egg mixture. Let cook until firm and lightly brown on the bottom, stirring quickly with a fork until the omelet starts to set. When set slip a large pancake turner under the omelet starts to set. When set, slip a large pancake turner under the omelet and turn it quickly to the other side. Let cook about five seconds. Remember, you want to produce a flat omelet, not a typical folded omelet. Turn the omelets out flat onto a sheet of was paper. Continue making omelets until all the egg mixture is used.

Ms. Warren’s instructions are word-for-word copies of Mr. Franey’s 1979 instructions for this recipe, with one exception. Ms. Warren says, “Let cook until firm and lightly brown…” and Mr. Franey says “Let cook until firm and lightly browned…” [emphasis added]

Mr. Franey elaborates in this 1979 article on the origins of the recipe:


When I was chef at Le Pavilion it enjoyed a considerable esteem in America, and the owner, Henri Soule, had one particular specialty that he would ask to have prepared for his pet customers. The dish was a great favorite of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Cole Porter. It is a delicate and interesting creation, especially good for summer dining. It consists of small omelets, flavored with herbs and bits of tomato, served cold with a crab meat filling…This is not the usual oval-shaped omelet rolled over a filling and served hot. It is a flat omelet that is cooked like a pancake and turned over once on the skillet, then served cold. [emphasis added]

Mr. Franey does not suggest that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor enjoyed Cold Omelets with Crab Meat due to any claim on their behalf of Cherokee ancestry, though it is true that the Duchess was American born.

The third potentially plagiarized recipe, "Herbed Tomatoes," appears to be copied from this 1959 recipe from Better Homes and Garden.

Ms. Warren ‘s campaign has not commented on the suggestion that she may have plagiarized her recipe contributions to the Pow Wow Chow cookbook. Sales of the Pow Wow Chow have heated up on Amazon since this controversy began, vaulting from a lowly 1.2 million ranking book to number 11,289 early this morning.
 

Steve

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Two of the possibly plagiarized recipes, said in the Pow Wow Chow cookbook to have been passed down through generations of Oklahoma Native American members of the Cherokee tribe

are liberals really that stupid?

or is "Cold Omelets with Crab Meat" and "Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing," really popular in Oklahoma at a pow wow?
 

Mike

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Steve said:
Two of the possibly plagiarized recipes, said in the Pow Wow Chow cookbook to have been passed down through generations of Oklahoma Native American members of the Cherokee tribe

are liberals really that stupid?

or is "Cold Omelets with Crab Meat" and "Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing," really popular in Oklahoma at a pow wow?

Of course they are. Why do you think they call her "Fauxcahontas"? :wink:

Now that Massachusetts Democrat Elizabeth Warren has stolen the title of America’s Most Famous Fake Indian from Ward Churchill, you might be wondering how real Cherokee feel about this wheezy academic fraud using their heritage to score herself some sweet “diversity” benefits. It would appear they are not amused.

Blogger William Jacobson of Legal Insurrection, who was among the first to wonder why anybody should take Warren’s word for even her pathetic claim of 3 percent Indian blood without solid documentation, got in touch with genealogist Twila Barnes, who is 7/32 Cherokee and – very conspicuously unlike Warren – actually does stay active in Cherokee affairs.

Barnes has her own blog, called Thoughts From Polly’s Granddaughter, and after dealing with a family emergency, she found the time to publish a scathing open letter to Warren. Barnes' missive should be read in full by clicking the link above, but here’s a particularly interesting passage:

We wonder why you believe you have the right to claim Cherokee ancestry and to call yourself a Native American when you have no evidence to support your claim. While you cling to a family story and the inaccurate report that ONE document was found that supports your claim, we real Cherokee understand that those things mean nothing.

You see, we Cherokees have lots and lots and lots of documentation supporting our claims of ancestry. Our Cherokee ancestors are found on every roll of the Cherokee Nation (30+ rolls!) dating back to before the remove and in all sorts of other documentation, including but not limited to claims against the US government for lost property; the Moravian missionary records; ration lists before and after the forced removal, etc… yet your ancestors are found in NONE of these records.


That’s a very pertinent point, which ties directly into the larger issue I believe the Warren story illuminates: our society places an increasing degree of emphasis on credentials, but many of those credentials are surprisingly easy to fake. For some reason, our high-tech, information-saturated society can still be persuaded to tolerate absurdities like Warren’s vaporous affirmative action claims, or opposition to sensible voter ID laws.

The notion of having to pull out paperwork from 1840 to prove Warren is a “woman of color” (as she was, hilariously, described by Harvard Law’s news director in a 1997 Fordham Law Review article) is absurd on its face, but someone with an actual Cherokee great-great-great-grandmother shouldn’t really have much trouble producing such papers, because the Cherokee saga was very well-documented.

You would think someone at a major American university would have known that, or at the very least someone at Harvard Law would have meditated upon the concept of “burden of proof,” as Barnes needles in her letter.

After publishing her letter, Barnes discussed Warren in a radio interview: “It’s like she’s stepping on the backs of Cherokee people to get what it is that she wants.” She’s working with other genealogists to produce a more authoritative report on Warren’s true family history. Meanwhile, liberals keep insisting Warren deserves a pass: it’s “old news,” she was a good teacher at Harvard, there are more important issues to discuss in the Massachusetts Senate race.

But Warren’s entire hard-Left philosophy is based on the idea that certain people benefit unfairly from communal resources, and must be punished. That’s what made her famous, remember? She gave a videotaped lecture insisting that Evil Rich People are unfairly profiting from the use of public resources, without which nobody could possibly achieve success in life. Affirmative-action fraud sounds like the kind of thing that would make her boil with rage… if anyone lacking the proper political credentials got caught doing it.

Update: Another aspect of this scandal is that Warren initially tried to deny that she ever passed herself off as a Native American. The documentation of her shameless lies keeps piling up. Here's a new piece to chew on: one of the "items of evidence" introduced in her increasingly desperate claims to Cherokee heritage was a 1984 cookbook entitled "Pow Wow Chow," edited by her first cousin.

The Boston Herald got its hands on a copy of this book, and discovered that Warren contributed several recipes. Each of them is credited to "Elizabeth Warren, Cherokee." They sound rather tasty, and while I find myself doubting the authenticity of the "crab with tomato mayonnaise dressing," I will humbly defer to the judgment of people like Twila Barnes on whether such dishes were traditionally served at Cherokee gatherings.

Bye Bye Senate!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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